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NOAA's Historic Coast & Geodetic Survey (C&GS) Collection
Catalog of Images

450 thumbnail picture
The vacuum printing frame used to process wet plate negatives to aluminum printing plates.
Washington, D.C.
451 thumbnail picture
Information from other sources is reduced and included in the compilation drawing. An operator is using a pantograph to produce the reduced image.
452 thumbnail picture
Operating the 50-inch camera which was invented by Lieutenant Otis Reading during the 1930's. This camera could photograph images up to 50 inches square. It would reproduce images with an error of less than one thousandth of an inch.
Washington, D.C.
453 thumbnail picture
The negatives are then exposed to sensitized aluminum plates.
454 thumbnail picture
The sheets are then reduced to the scale of the chart, proper selection of the material which will appear on it being made, and the whole worked into a compilation drawing.
455 thumbnail picture
The soundings showing depths throughout the water areas are machine-cut through the film of the negative.
456 thumbnail picture
After the plate is completed, a proof is made on the above press. The plates are made for offset printing and the proof is made by taking the print from the plate to a rubber blanket fastened on the cylinder. The rubber blanket deposits the print to the paper. Up-to-the minute corrections are applied to the plate at this stage, and the plate is then ready for final printing.
457 thumbnail picture
Engraving on a nautical chart negatives.
458 thumbnail picture
Engraving on nautical chart negative.
459 thumbnail picture
Compiling a nautical chart from field survey sheets and other data.
460 thumbnail picture
Preparing printing plates for presses.
461 thumbnail picture
Compilation work for a nautical chart.
462 thumbnail picture
Reproduction methods of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.
463 thumbnail picture
Negative engraving tools.
464 thumbnail picture
All the field data are sent to the Washington Office where the triangulation, magnetic, and tidal work is examined by mathematicians who make the necessary adjustments to connect it with work already done. Cartographers complete the plotting, inking and verification of the hydrographic and topographic sheets.
465 thumbnail picture
Using a multi-plex stereoplotter to develop shoreline and topography from aerial photography.
466 thumbnail picture
Army aerial photography unit with three-lens camera. Circa 1920's.
467 thumbnail picture
Nine-lens camera used by the Coast and Geodetic Survey. It obtains topography to be employed on nautical charts, and for making airport surveys. The camera takes nine photographs simultaneously of adjoining areas on a single piece of film 23 inches square. The center photograph is taken vertically downward, while the other eight are oblique views.
468 thumbnail picture
Nine-lens photograph. Reduction of a nine-lens camera photograph as taken with the aerial camera of the C&GS. The top photo represents the contact print from the negative, and the bottom photo represents the transposed view.
469 thumbnail picture
Monument 272 along the Alaska-Canada Boundary in the Southeast Alaska area.
Alaska, Southeast
470 thumbnail picture
Third-order triangulation station Iquak in southwest Alaska, while attached to the USC&GS Steamer DISCOVERER in 1923.
Alaska, Southeast
471 thumbnail picture
Surveying party climbing over a glacier with Mount St. Elias in the background. Note dog with pack in foreground.
Alaska, Mt. St. Elias
472 thumbnail picture
Packing across a river in South Mindanao, Philippine Islands, enroute to a triangulation station.
Philippine Islands, South Mindanao
473 thumbnail picture
A triangulation party at the foot of Mt. Galintan in the Davao Gulf region of Mindanao, Philippine Islands. The party but a few minutes before had emerged from the woods in the background through which they had traveled by compass alone for a day and a half. The vegetation is cogon grass of moderate height. However, even here it reaches to the men's waists.
Philippine Islands, Mt. Galintan, Davao Gulf
474 thumbnail picture
Freighting in Texas with a barrel wagon.
Texas
475 thumbnail picture
Packing a theodolite across the swollen Verde River, 1924.
Utah
476 thumbnail picture
Canadian and U.S. representatives of the Alaska-Canada International Boundary Survey meet at Point Demarcation on the Beaufort Sea. The U.S. representative took great pride in having attended Princeton University.
Alaska, North Slope, Point Demarcation
477 thumbnail picture
Northernmost point on the Alaska-Canada Boundary, where the 141st Meridian projects into the Beaufort Sea. The U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey represented the U.S. in the delineation of this boundary.
Alaska, North Slope, Point Demarcation
478 thumbnail picture
The "goat trail" in Chitistone Valley used during the Alaska-Canada Boundary Survey, 1913.
Alaska, Southeast
479 thumbnail picture
Early C&GS trucks passing through plowed field.
480 thumbnail picture
A plane-table party working in Alaska. The use of aluminum-mounted topographic survey sheets greatly facilitated plane table surveys in regions where fog and rain prevail, as they eliminate the difficulty due to distortion of ordinary paper sheets.
Alaska
481 thumbnail picture
The making of a plane-table survey in Philippine mangrove swamps. These waters were frequented by salt-water crocodiles necessitating a constant lookout . This party was off the C&GS Steamer FATHOMER during the field season of 1915-1916.
Philippine Islands
482 thumbnail picture
Shoreline topography in Alaska.
Alaska
483 thumbnail picture
Topographic work in Alaska, Glacier Bay area, off of C&GS Ship WESTDAHL.
Alaska, Glacier Bay
484 thumbnail picture
Topographic work in Alaska, Glacier Bay area, off of C&GS Ship WESTDAHL.
Alaska, Glacier Bay
485 thumbnail picture
A theodolite for observing horizontal angles.
486 thumbnail picture
Observing horizontal angles with a Wild T-3 theodolite from a lighthouse.
487 thumbnail picture
Triangulation tower constructed from pre-cut lumber at Tacoma North Base. Pre- Bilby Tower era.
488 thumbnail picture
Building crew constructing a steel portable Bilby triangulation tower.
489 thumbnail picture
Station Tensas. A 159-foot Bilby tower was constructed here in April, 1931. Lieutenant Ralph Pfau was chief of party at this station along the Atlanta- Shreveport triangulation arc.
490 thumbnail picture
Using collimator to align instrument observing stand at top of Bilby tower with mark in the ground at a triangulation station.
491 thumbnail picture
A Bilby triangulation tower in the vicinity of an oil production facility.
492 thumbnail picture
Light keeper orienting lights for triangulation observing party prior to beginning night's observations. Apparently operating off a water tower.
493 thumbnail picture
Making near contact on low bench over a traverse station. Invar tapes pulled to maintain a constant tension were used to measure distances in the days before electronic distance measuring devices.
494 thumbnail picture
Contact platforms were under water because of heavy rains during traverse survey using invar tapes. Along the Florida West Coast in 1928.
495 thumbnail picture
George B. Lesley using Geodimeter Model 2A for measuring distance by mercury vapor light over long distances. Pappy Shelton, chief of the geodimeter party, is on the radio.
496 thumbnail picture
Pappy Shelton, chief of the first geodimeter party, using Model 2A geodimeter. This instrument used a mercury vapor light source.
497 thumbnail picture
Mechanized leveling before the automobile. Using a railroad velocipede to transport a level instrument as well as serve as the stand.
498 thumbnail picture
Second-order leveling observing unit working in Virginia in 1935.
499 thumbnail picture
A Bamberg astronomic theodolite used to determine astronomic latitude and longitude as well as determine gravitational deflection from the vertical.

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013