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NOAA's America's Coastlines Collection
Catalog of Images

5200 thumbnail picture
The spit at Teller. There is a breakwater at the end. Outer Port Clarence is on the left and the Inner Bay on the right.
Alaska, Teller 2010 August
5201 thumbnail picture
Homes and communications antennas at Teller.
Alaska, Teller 2010 August
5202 thumbnail picture
Aluminum boats with outboards have replaced the native kayaks.
Alaska 2010 August
5203 thumbnail picture
Fish drying racks. Silver or coho salmon drying that have been cut back to the skin to make what is called dryfish. The fish has also been a little bit smoked to drive off the moisture on the surface which discourages flies from laying eggs.
Alaska 2010 August
5204 thumbnail picture
A view of Teller. The lake to the left is a saline lagoon. Photo #1 of sequence.
Alaska 2010 August
5205 thumbnail picture
A view of Teller. The lake to the left is a saline lagoon. Articulated tugs are both in Port Clarence and in the Inner Bay. Photo #2 of sequence.
Alaska 2010 August
5206 thumbnail picture
The Inner Bay as seen from the highest hill in the vicinity of Teller. The Teller airport is on top of this hill. Photo #3 of sequence.
Alaska 2010 August
5207 thumbnail picture
The Inner Bay as seen from the highest hill in the vicinity of Teller. The Teller airport is on top of this hill. Photo #4 of sequence.
Alaska 2010 August
5208 thumbnail picture
A small stream leading to Salmon Lake north of Nome. Although late August, fall colors are already beginning to show.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5209 thumbnail picture
A small stream leading to Salmon Lake north of Nome. Although late August, fall colors are already beginning to show.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5210 thumbnail picture
Basin on the road to Pilgrim Hot Springs. Mountains are in Bering Land Bridge National Monument on the north side of the Seward Peninsula.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5211 thumbnail picture
Former Catholic Mission at Pilgrim Hot Springs on the Pilgrim River, Imuruk Basin
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5212 thumbnail picture
Believed to be the largest trees on the Seward Peninsula at Pilgrim Hot Springs. The geothermal heat allows these trees to thrive in this area. The permafrost has melted in this area leaving a thermal oasis.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5213 thumbnail picture
A path through the trees at Pilgrim Hot Springs sized for ATV's . The temperature of the springs is approximately 81 degrees Celsius.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5214 thumbnail picture
An artesian thermal well at Pilgrim Hot Springs. Note the vapor steam at the right of the pipe orifice. The shallow aquifer here has temperatures of 81 degrees Celsius.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5215 thumbnail picture
Hot tub at Pilgrim Hot Springs supplied by natural geothermal waters.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5216 thumbnail picture
Looking south in the Imuruk Basin towards the Kigluiak Mountains from the hot tub at Pilgrim Hot Springs.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5217 thumbnail picture
An example of thermo-karst topography caused by the melting of permafrost causing the road to drop. In this instance the relative elevation change is approximately 10 feet.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5218 thumbnail picture
A ubiquitous problem throughout Alaska. Virtually all developmental projects that required equipment to be brought in have "fossil" equipment left on-site which was deserted after the project.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5219 thumbnail picture
A thermo-karst melt pond adjacent to the road which accelerated the melting of permafrost. On the road from Nome beyond Pilgrim Hot Springs.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5220 thumbnail picture
A thermo-karst melt pond adjacent to the road which accelerated the melting of permafrost. On the road from Nome beyond Pilgrim Hot Springs. This now becoming a wetland wildlife habitat.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5221 thumbnail picture
The Kougarok River on the Seward Peninsula.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5222 thumbnail picture
A scene looking over Salmon Lake at the BLM campground.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5223 thumbnail picture
A scene looking over Salmon Lake at the BLM campground.
Alaska, Seward Peninsula 2010 August
5224 thumbnail picture
A floating metal pontoon boat that has been modified to run a gold dredge on the Nome River.
Alaska, Nome 2010 August
5225 thumbnail picture
Radar installation at the Nome Airport. Note the elevated stanchions supporting the structure. These have been driven deep into the permafrost to mitigate the effects of permafrost melting in the upper layers. This is a direct consequence of warming of the Arctic.
Alaska, Nome 2010 August
5226 thumbnail picture
All that remains of the Russian Orthodox Church at St. Michael. The top of the spire that held the cross.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5227 thumbnail picture
Remains of Yukon River paddlewheel steamers. St. Michael was the jumping off point for gold miners heading up the Yukon to the goldfields.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5228 thumbnail picture
The view of St. Michael from the same vantage point as sketched by Henry Elliott in 1870. See: image line5141.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5229 thumbnail picture
A view of St. Michael. The large orange building is the village school.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5230 thumbnail picture
A view of St. Michael.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5231 thumbnail picture
A thermokarst caused by melting of permafrost. This is becoming an increasingly serious problem in the Alaskan Arctic. The hole is at least 8 feet deep.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5232 thumbnail picture
A dog sled team and satellite television receiver. The apparent misdirection of the antenna is because it is aimed at a larger community antenna that transmits locally to St. Michael.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5233 thumbnail picture
Remains of Yukon River paddlewheel steamers. St. Michael was the jumping off point for gold miners heading up the Yukon to the goldfields.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5234 thumbnail picture
As opposed to this being a frost heave, this is a frost heave with the ground sagging down in an area of melting permafrost causing a thermokarst.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5235 thumbnail picture
Paddlewheels and boilers of derelict Yukon River steamers. Remnants of the Yukon gold rush.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5236 thumbnail picture
Paddlewheels and boilers of derelict Yukon River steamers. Remnants of the Yukon gold rush.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5237 thumbnail picture
Piping and machinery of derelict Yukon River steamers. Remnants of the Yukon gold rush.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5238 thumbnail picture
The history of St. Michael can be discerned from these glass remnants. Russian, American, Chinese glass and porcelain fragments.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5239 thumbnail picture
Looking across to the mainland from St. Michael Island.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5240 thumbnail picture
The story of St. Michael told in glass remnants. Russian, American, and Chinese glass and porcelain fragments.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5241 thumbnail picture
Store of the Alaska Commercial Company, exactly on the top of the old Russian American Company trading post.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5242 thumbnail picture
Looking across to the mainland at dusk.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5243 thumbnail picture
Dawn at St. Michael with rays of sun showing below cloud deck.
Alaska, St. Michael 2010 August
5244 thumbnail picture
Leaving St. Michael from the air.
Alaska, Unalakleet 2010 August
5245 thumbnail picture
Native Village of Unalakleet. Unalakleet in Inupiat language means literally "Winds coming from the East." This is clearly visible in this image as the squall in the image came from the east and was soon raining on the Unalakleet Airport.
Alaska, Unalakleet 2010 August
5246 thumbnail picture
Thermokarst on melting permafrost caused by improper road construction.
Alaska, Unalakleet 2010 August
5247 thumbnail picture
Mother and daughter going to harvest blueberries on the family ATV.
Alaska, Unalakleet 2010 August
5248 thumbnail picture
Drying coho salmon on racks
Alaska, Unalakleet 2010 August
5249 thumbnail picture
Looking over the Unalakleet River Delta over sparse trees and foliage of the Alaska sub-Arctic.
Alaska, Unalakleet 2010 August

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013