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NOAA's Fisheries Collection
Catalog of Images

2700 thumbnail picture
Freckled rockfish (Sebastes lentiginosus). A freckled rockfish over muddy substrate.
2701 thumbnail picture
Chameleon rockfish (Sebastes phillipsi). Several chameleon rockfish over deep, rocky substrate and sea urchins.
2702 thumbnail picture
Copper rockfish (Sebastes caurinus). A solitary copper rockfish over rocky substrate.
2703 thumbnail picture
Blue rockfish (Sebastes mystinus). A blue rockfish uncharacteristically resting on the rocky seafloor.
2704 thumbnail picture
Greenstriped rockfish (Sebastes elongatus). A greenstriped rockfish resting on mixed substrate.
2705 thumbnail picture
Brown rockfish (Sebastes auriculatus). A brown rockfish over rocky substrate.
2706 thumbnail picture
California market squid (Doryteuthis (Loligo) opalescens ) egg capsule and paralarvae are from an experiment conducted in 2000 at the SWFSC. Egg capsules were collected and placed in different temperature baths to determine their optimal temperature for hatching and development.
California, La Jolla 2000 February 4
2707 thumbnail picture
California market squid (Doryteuthis (Loligo) opalescens ) taken through a microscope in 2003. These wild-caught paralarvae were collected in a manta sample in January 1989 from CalCOFI station 90.37 aboard the NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN. The smallest squid is 2.67 mm, and the largest is 4.45 mm.
California offshore 2003, February 6
2708 thumbnail picture
This specimen of squid (Abraliopsis felis) does not have a common name. It was collected in a bongo tow sample in 2007 from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography vessel NEW HORIZON during the fall CalCOFI cruise at line 86.7 Station 100.0 .
California offshore 2008 March 14
2709 thumbnail picture
An old Pepsi can sits on the rocky seafloor near 43 Fathom Bank off the coast of San Diego. Behind the can is a shortspine thornyhead (Sebastolobus alascanus). Photo taken by SWFSC remotely operated vehicle at 530 meters depth.
California offshore 2005 March
2710 thumbnail picture
A large car/boat battery rests on the sea floor near San Nicolas Island. The battery is covered in crinoids, which may serve as artificial habitat for a young rosy rockfish (Sebastes rosaceus). This photo was taken by the SWFSC remotely operated vehicle at approximately 110 meters.
California offshore 2007 December
2711 thumbnail picture
An orange bucket rests on the sea floor at the Blackgill Spot, near 43 Fathom Bank off the coast of San Diego. The bucket has become home to a sea anemone and a few brittle stars. This photo was taken by the SWFSC remotely operated vehicle at approximately 430 meters.
California offshore 2006 February
2712 thumbnail picture
A stack of un-fired ammunition lies partially buried in the soft sediment at 9 Mile Bank off the coast of San Diego. Several brittle stars have excavated a home underneath the shell casings. This photo was taken by the SWFSC remotely operated vehicle at approximately 150 meters.
California offshore 2006 March
2713 thumbnail picture
An unhappy fisherman has recently lost one of his XTRATUFF boots at Tanner Bank. This photo was taken by the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's remotely operated vehicle (ROV) at approximately 40m.
California offshore 2008 October
2714 thumbnail picture
A derelict gill net continues to 'ghost fish' at Farnsworth Bank, near Santa Catalina Island in southern California. In this case, a shark has recently become entangled in the net and died. This photo was taken by the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's remotely operated vehicle (ROV) at approximately 50m.
California offshore 2008 October
2715 thumbnail picture
A prawn/fish trap rests on the sea floor at Farnsworth Bank, near Santa Catalina Island in southern California. A school of small rosy rockfishes (Sebastes rosaceus) are aggregated around the trap. This trap has likely been in place for a while given the amount of encrusting organisms present. This photo was taken by the SWFSC remotely operated vehicle at approximately 35 meters.
California offshore 2008 October
2716 thumbnail picture
A classic example of marine debris, a derelict fish/prawn trap continues to 'ghost fish' at 9 Mile Bank, which is approximately nine miles off the coast of San Diego. Inside the trap, there is at least one bank rockfish (Sebastes rufus) . This photo was taken by the Southwest Fisheries Science Center's remotely operated vehicle at approximately 530 meters.
California offshore 2005 January
2717 thumbnail picture
Ragfish egg (Icosteus aenigmaticus) image taken under a microscope at the SWFSC in La Jolla. The egg was collected 4/14/2006 in a continuous underway fish egg sampler (CUFES) sample aboard the NOAA Ship OSCAR DYSON off the coast of Washington.
Washington offshore 2006 April 14
2718 thumbnail picture
Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) eggs collected and photographed under a microscope in April 2006 during FRD's California Current Ecosystem Survey aboard the NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN.
California offshore 2006 April
2719 thumbnail picture
These Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax) larvae are from the SWFSC ichthyoplankton reference collection. The specimens were collected in the CalCOFI area.
California offshore 2006 November
2720 thumbnail picture
Curlfin turbot (Pleuronichthys decurrens), a right-eyed flounder found in the eastern Pacific. Larva and juvenile specimen from SWFSC La Jolla ichthyoplankton reference collection. Top is a 6.5 mm larva, taken in a 1-meter ring net in June 1952 from CalCOFI Station 70.65 aboard the R/V SPENCER F. BAIRD Bottom image is 31 mm juvenile taken in mid-water trawl, April 1972, off JORDAN
Pacific Ocean eastern 2010 January 26
2721 thumbnail picture
Cowcod larvae (Sebastes levis), a species of rockfish. Top specimens collected in bongo tow in April 2006 at CalCOFI station 83.3 42.0 aboard Scripps ship NEW HORIZON. Larva on left is 3.3 mm, on right 3.1 mm. The 7.4 mm flexion stage larva on bottom was collected in a bongo tow in 4/2009 at station 95.45 during SWFSC California Current Ecosystem Survey aboard charter vessel FROSTI.
California offshore 2010 February 3
2722 thumbnail picture
Jack mackerel (Trachurus symmetricus) eggs and larva are part of the SWFSC La Jolla ichthyoplankton reference collection specimens. They were collected from the CalCOFI area.
California offshore 2007 February 9
2723 thumbnail picture
Planktonic protists: plants and grazers. The two yellowish protists are diatoms (plants) while the brown life forms are tintinnids (grazers). Examples of morphological diversity of protists. Sample from a plankton net tow in the Bay of Villefranche on the January 25 2011. The two diatoms (plants) and the three tintinnid ciliates, which feed on small plants, have very different shapes.
2724 thumbnail picture
Astrolithium cruciatum
2725 thumbnail picture
Tintinnopsis beroidea .
2726 thumbnail picture
Carpocanium Sp. Skeleton of the radiolarian Carpocanium from a sample in the Aegean Sea at 600m depth
2727 thumbnail picture
Ceratium digitatum (running away!)
2728 thumbnail picture
Cell wall of Ceratium tripos
2729 thumbnail picture
Cladopyxis sp. Dinoflagellate from the Aegean Sea. Lugol's-fixed specimen from 75m depth.
2730 thumbnail picture
Climacocyclis scalaria - Specimen from the Bay of Villefranche in October 2010, Lugol's-fixed. Images taken with a 20X objective and compiled with a Helico Focus.
2731 thumbnail picture
Globigerinid Foramaniferan. Possibly Globigerinella siphonifera or Globerigina falconensis (according to Jan Pawlowski)
2732 thumbnail picture
Phycologist humor - lorica evolution? Why have a lorica or shell? The lorica or shell likely evolved as protection against predation by other protists such as dinoflagellates and radiolarians who use feeding tubes and pseudopodia. The seemingly odd morphologies of planktonic organisms are the result of "Watery Arms Race" pitting prey against predator according to Victor Smetacek.
2733 thumbnail picture
Unidentified planktonic protist. If you know what this is, please contact the Observatoire Oceanologique de Villefrance-sur-Mer
2734 thumbnail picture
Probably Lamprocyclas maritalis
2735 thumbnail picture
Parafavella parumdentata - specimen collected from the Bering Sea by Diane Stoecker.
2736 thumbnail picture
Protohabdonella curta - a tintinnid microzooplankton species
2737 thumbnail picture
Radiolarian ate the tintinnid Proplectella
2738 thumbnail picture
Scyphosphaera apsteinii. A coccolithophorid from the Ionean Sea. Coccolithhophorids are plants and cover their cells with calcium carbonate plates.
2739 thumbnail picture
Star radiolarian. Specimen from the Bay of Villefranche in October 2010. Lugol's-fixed.
2740 thumbnail picture
Steenstrupiella steenstrupii
2741 thumbnail picture
Dadayiella ganymedes - From the Indian Ocean collected during the Tara Oceans Expedition at Station 58, DCM, image using 60X objective
2742 thumbnail picture
Tiarina fusus - The mouth end of this marine ciliate is at the top. It has calcium carbonate plates (the beaded surface). It feeds on microscopic algae.
2743 thumbnail picture
Wagon wheel diatom
2744 thumbnail picture
CTD rosette being deployed. CTD stands for Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurement instrument.
2010
2745 thumbnail picture
CTD rosette in water. CTD stands for Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurement instrument.
2010
2746 thumbnail picture
CTD rosette going down. CTD stands for Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurement instrument.
2010
2747 thumbnail picture
CTD rosette coming up. CTD stands for Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurement instrument.
2010
2748 thumbnail picture
CTD rosette coming up. CTD stands for Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurement instrument.
2010
2749 thumbnail picture
CTD rosette coming up. CTD stands for Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurement instrument.
2010

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013