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NOAA's Fisheries Collection
Catalog of Images

3150 thumbnail picture
This fisherman in Aransas Pass, Texas, like many anglers, is adept at cast-netting for bait fish.
3151 thumbnail picture
A small Texas shrimp boat heads out of Corpus Christi for day-long fishing trip in the productive Laguna Madre.
3152 thumbnail picture
This gourmet market in metropolitan Washington, D.C., offers up a mouth-watering platter of shrimp.
3153 thumbnail picture
Mississippi shrimp boats, like these in Biloxi, are often identical to those of Louisiana and Texas.
3154 thumbnail picture
Small wingnetters, like this one in Louisiana's Bayou La Fourche, take a surprising amount of the smaller-sized shrimp.
3155 thumbnail picture
June Krantz, a successful lobster trapper in Casco Bay, Maine, is one of thousands of women participating in commercial American fisheries.
3156 thumbnail picture
This shrimp net has both a mesh-panel, bycatch-reduction device (BRD) and grill-type, turtle-excluder device (TED).
3157 thumbnail picture
Fishermen, scientists, and shrimp farmers sign up for a Corpus Christi, Texas, workshop on shrimp aquaculture.
3158 thumbnail picture
Florida Bay looks serene but is vulnerable to pesticide contamination from runoff.
3159 thumbnail picture
Repaired iron-and-wood frames of submerged pound-type pens await return to specially licensed areas off Pt. Judith, Rhode Island.
3160 thumbnail picture
Maine's lobster industry depends on hundreds of thousands of these plastic-coated galvanized wire traps, which are set everywhere along the coast.
3161 thumbnail picture
Lobster claws are banded to protect handlers - and fellow lobsters - at this market in Jessup, Maryland.
3162 thumbnail picture
Pt. Judith's small lobster boats set pots in Long Island Sound, while the while the larger Rhode Island boats fish offshore.
3163 thumbnail picture
A Pt. Judith, Rhode Island, bait seller strings skates for sale to local lobstermen.
3164 thumbnail picture
Demand for Florida Keys spiny lobster is heavy at dockside restaurants, like this one in Islamorada.
3165 thumbnail picture
This thirty-foot lobster sculpture in Plantation Key, Florida, is guaranteed to stop traffic and sharpen appetites.
3166 thumbnail picture
Wood-and-wire lobster pots, seen here on a dock at Puerto Rico's Fajardo Beach, are still common in the Caribbean.
3167 thumbnail picture
The nation's capital attracts swarms of crab-lovers to its riverfront market steamers on warm summer evenings.
3168 thumbnail picture
A well-gloved worker in a Washington, D.C., seafood market demonstrates blue crabs' tenacious grip.
3169 thumbnail picture
Few seafoods have the ‚clat of Florida's stone crab, with entire restaurants devoted to this one product.
3170 thumbnail picture
Locally caught scallops are a specialty of coastal restaurants, like this one in Pt. Pleasant, New Jersey.
3171 thumbnail picture
Workers sort scallops by size at a waterside processing plant in Seaford, Virginia.
3172 thumbnail picture
Seaford, Virginia, is home to a large and modern fleet of scallop dredgers.
3173 thumbnail picture
Freeport, Long Island, clam boats share dock space with vessels fishing squid, flounder, and other coastal species.
3174 thumbnail picture
At a Kent Narrows, Maryland, processing plant, a worker ices down steamer clams to keep them alive until cooking.
3175 thumbnail picture
Littleneck clams grown out in marshside pens are rinsed at a clam farm in Folly Beach, South Carolina.
3176 thumbnail picture
Piles of shells are destined as habitat in the next generation of larval oysters in St. Michaels, Maryland.
3177 thumbnail picture
Tons of bagged blue point oysters are trucked to market from shoreside beds near Norwalk, Connecticut.
3178 thumbnail picture
This small Norwalk, Connecticut, boat serves beds of the privately owned blue point oysters.
3179 thumbnail picture
A Florida Keys shop boast queen conch shells, but the species is badly overfished in both Florida and the Caribbean.
3180 thumbnail picture
The homely but tastey whelk needs healthy marshes for its survival like this one in North Carolina's Albemarle Sound.
3181 thumbnail picture
Fishermen from Pt. Pleasant, New Jersey, now target squid and other resources because of groundfish declines.
3182 thumbnail picture
Urchin boats, like this one in Portland, Maine, are usually quite small and crewed by just two people.
3183 thumbnail picture
Many people consider the rough spicules and uneven contours of natural sponge superior to the synthetic product.
3184 thumbnail picture
One of Florida's remaining sponge boats returns to Tarpon Springs with the animals drying on a tarp-covered frame.
3185 thumbnail picture
Maine fishermen are investing in algal cultivation to meet the heavy demand for these processed sheets of nori.
3186 thumbnail picture
Hurt by groundfish declines, Gloucester, Massachusetts, welcomes tourist dollars from whale watching.
3187 thumbnail picture
A Pascagoula, Mississippi, shrimper crew helps an enforcement officer verify that their TED meets specifications.
3188 thumbnail picture
A large group of specimens of red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) taken in Kola Bay, Salnyi Island area at Lat. 69 7.2 N, 33 26.3 E. Water temp 2 C; air temp 8 C; taken at depths of 10-35 meters. King crab are an introduced species in the Barents Sea.
Russia, Barents Sea 2001June 28
3189 thumbnail picture
150 red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) acquired in one day's diving in Kola Bay, Salnyi Island area at Lat. 69 7.2 N, 33 26.3 E. Water temp 2 C; air temp 8 C; taken at depths of 10-35 meters. King crab are an introduced species in the Barents Sea.
Russia, Barents Sea 2001June 28
3190 thumbnail picture
150 red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) acquired in one day's diving in Kola Bay, Salnyi Island area at Lat. 69 7.2 N, 33 26.3 E. Water temp 2 C; air temp 8 C; taken at depths of 10-35 meters. King crab are an introduced species in the Barents Sea.
Russia, Barents Sea 2001June 28
3191 thumbnail picture
The domestic crab (Hyas araneus) is well-camouflaged under a seaweed (Laminaria Sakharina) leave in Dalnezeletsky Bay, Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 8 C; air temp 5 C; depth 16 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 1
3192 thumbnail picture
King crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) are an aggressive invasive species in the Barents Sea. They decimate the local biota as they migrate through an area. Shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 8 C; air temp 5 C; depth 16 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 8
3193 thumbnail picture
King crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) are an aggressive invasive species in the Barents Sea. They decimate the local biota as they migrate through an area. Shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 6 C; air temp 15 C; depth 17 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 26
3194 thumbnail picture
King crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) are an aggressive invasive species in the Barents Sea. They decimate the local biota as they migrate through an area. Shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 6 C; air temp 15 C; depth 22 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 25
3195 thumbnail picture
King crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) are an aggressive invasive species in the Barents Sea. They decimate the local biota as they migrate through an area. Shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 6 C; air temp 15 C; depth 22 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 25
3196 thumbnail picture
King crabs (Paralithodes camtschaticus) are an aggressive invasive species in the Barents Sea. They decimate the local biota as they migrate through an area. Shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 6 C; air temp 15 C; depth 22 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 25
3197 thumbnail picture
Typical view of bottom in moderate depths. Sea stars ( Asterias rubens) and sea-urchin (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) are shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 5 C; air temp 14 C; depth 12 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 September 8
3198 thumbnail picture
Typical view of bottom in deeper areas. Mussels (Mytilus edulis) and sea-urchins (Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis) are shown here in Dalnezelenetsky Bay at Lat. 69 7.3 N, Long. 36 4.2E. Water temp 2 C; air temp 12 C; depth 25 meters.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 August 21
3199 thumbnail picture
Typical view of bottom in deeper areas following passage of king crab agressive invasion in Kola Bay at Belokanenka, Lat. 69 6.4 N, Long. 33 22.5 E. Water temp 3 C; air temp 18 C; depth 21 meters. Note that sea anemone ( Actinaria g.sp.) and soft corals (Eunepthya sp.) survive but all else is decimated by crabs as they migrate through the area.
Russia, Barents Sea 2002 July 19

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Last Updated:
June 10, 2016