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NOAA's Historic Fisheries Collection
Catalog of Images

5600 thumbnail picture
Red crab. This is a walking crab, not a swimmer. The male red crab reaches a size of 2 1/4 pounds or more. The female is smaller and averages about 1 1/4 pounds.
North Atlantic Ocean
5601 thumbnail picture
Hermit crab
Wake Island, Pacific Ocean 1923 August 4
5602 thumbnail picture
Skate, snail, and blue crab caught in clam dredge
Atlantic Ocean, Mid-Atlantic U.S. 1968 August
5603 thumbnail picture
Tanner crabs caught by BCF research vessel MILLER FREEMAN
Alaska, Bering Sea
5604 thumbnail picture
Artwork - California corbina (Menticirrhus undulatus)
5605 thumbnail picture
Bering Sea king crab average 7 to 8 pounds total weight; recoverable meat is between 20 and 25 percent. Taken aboard BCF research vessel MILLER FREEMAN.
Alaska, Bering Sea 1969
5606 thumbnail picture
Exploratory fishing for king crab
Alaska, Aleutian Islands
5607 thumbnail picture
A 150-pound container of king crab about to be lowered in brine freezer at the Point Chehalis Packers.
Alaska, Cordova 1968 October
5608 thumbnail picture
Male (lower) and female (upper) Alaska king crab (Paralithodes camtechatica). Male crabs are considerably larger than females. The spiny exoskeleton provides protection from enemies.
5609 thumbnail picture
King crab being transferred to haul-away cart from weighing bucket at the Point Chehalis Packers plant.
Alaska, Cordova
5610 thumbnail picture
Floating water "trailers" attached to a "mother" ship keep giant king crabs alive until fisheries scientists from FWS come and take their vital signs
Alaska, Ketchikan 1960 April
5611 thumbnail picture
The king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica).
5612 thumbnail picture
Artwork - The Alaska king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica).
5613 thumbnail picture
Offloading king crab at Ketchikan
Alaska, Ketchikan 1960 April
5614 thumbnail picture
Measuring carapace of Alaska king crab. Accurate measurement of animals is necessary to permit accurate interpretation of data.
5615 thumbnail picture
The king crab (Paralithodes camtschatica).
5616 thumbnail picture
A rare male albino king crab is compared to a male king crab of normal coloration. This unusual specimen was caught by the crew of the Kodiak based king crab vessel MINNIE B. off Sitkalidak in 60 fathoms of water.
Alaska, Sitkalidak 1966 November 12
5617 thumbnail picture
King crab operations in the Kodiak Island area
Alaska, Kodiak Island
5618 thumbnail picture
A 150-pound block of brine frozen king crab is packaged for shipment at the Point Chehalis Packers plant.
Alaska, Cordova 1968 October
5619 thumbnail picture
Artwork - blue crab
5620 thumbnail picture
As a result of a FWS expedition to Alaska just prior to WW II, large resources of giant crabs were discovered. These had been extensively exploited by the Japanese prior to the war, who canned the meat, and then sold it to the United States. King crab.
5621 thumbnail picture
58 bushels of green crabs (Carcinus maenus) trapped in three days in town effort to reduce crab population. These crabs were an invasive species and were decimating local shell fisheries.
Massachusetts, Ipswich 1938 circa
5622 thumbnail picture
Green crab (Carcinus maenus), an invasive species, pits on clam flats.
Maine, Scarborough 1953 Circa
5623 thumbnail picture
The green crab (Carcinus maenus) reaches a maximum size of 3.5 inches in width. Each crab can eat 15 small soft-shell clams per day. The green crab is an invasive species, transported from northern Europe in the 1930's,
1953 Circa
5624 thumbnail picture
Green crabs, which have become abundant north of Cape Cod during recent warm winter cycle are believed to be responsible for soft clam shortage.
1953 Circa
5625 thumbnail picture
A green crab crushes a two-inch soft shell clam. Crabs can dig 9 inches deep in the flats.
1953 Circa
5626 thumbnail picture
Dead green crabs after feeding upon chopped alewives treated with lindane, a pesticide and sometimes pharmaceutical for treating scabies and lice. This was a controlled experiment in Upper Landing Creek.
Maine, Wells 1953 Circa
5627 thumbnail picture
Green crab and horseshoe crab fence. Depressions in flats are made by the two types of crabs. Rare inside fence, common outside fence.
Massachusetts, Newburyport, Plum Island Sound 1953 June
5628 thumbnail picture
Green crab and horseshoe crab fence. Green crabs can climb up wire but not over board at top.
Massachusetts, Newburyport, Plum Island Sound 1953 June
5629 thumbnail picture
Testing poison baits to kill several species of crabs, which are predators of soft and hard clams. These tests led to an efficient and cheap method for control of crabs.
5630 thumbnail picture
Artwork - Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) by G. T. Sundstrom
5631 thumbnail picture
Measuring the carapace of the male dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
Alaska, Ketchikan 1954 August
5632 thumbnail picture
Male dungeness crab captured in Clarence Strait
Alaska, Clarence Strait 1952 September 19
5633 thumbnail picture
Dungeness crabs from near the town of Kake
Alaska, Hamilton Bay, Kupreanof Island
5634 thumbnail picture
Female dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
Washington, Seattle
5635 thumbnail picture
Female dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
Washington, Seattle
5636 thumbnail picture
Dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
Washington, Seattle
5637 thumbnail picture
Male dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
Washington, Seattle
5638 thumbnail picture
Seattle laboratory fisheries scientist with dungeness crabs (Cancer magister)
Washington, Seattle
5639 thumbnail picture
Male dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
5640 thumbnail picture
The dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
5641 thumbnail picture
Experimental clam farm protected from crab predators by 300-foot circular fence.
Massachusetts, Newburyport, Plum Island Sound 1953 June
5642 thumbnail picture
The smallest, average, and largest hard clams and cockles, grown for the same length of time at two apprently similar stations, illustrating the superiority of the environment at the e station.
Connecticut, Milford 1957
5643 thumbnail picture
An experimental setup to observe simultaneously various aspects of the behavior of juvenile clams kept at five different temperatures.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
5644 thumbnail picture
Biologist working in a clam hatchery.
5645 thumbnail picture
The Sam's Cove anti-crab fence. This low wire fence, specially designed by clam investigations at Boothbay Harbor Laboratory to exclude predatory green crabs from soft clam producing flats, had been maintained for over five years at the time of this photograph. The fence encloses 3-4 acres and is over 500 feet in circumference.
Maine, Bremen 1960 April
5646 thumbnail picture
Portion of clam flats at Sam's Cove illustrating excellent survival of clams within the fenced area (siphon holes at left) and no survival outside (right side.)
Maine, Bremen 1960 April
5647 thumbnail picture
Difference in size of clams grown for ten weeks in sea water (control) and in two different concentrations of green algae, Chlorella. Experiments indicated that the presence of large numbers of food organisms in the water is undesirable .
Connecticut, Milford 1960
5648 thumbnail picture
Harry Davis, Fishery Research Biologist at the Milford Laboratory, changes water in cultures of clam larvae every other day and then adds food. Glass, plastic, and stainless steel equipment is necessary as larvae are killed by ions from other metals such as copper.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
5649 thumbnail picture
Soft-shell clams planted at 50 per square foot inside and outside crab fence at Jonesport. A cooperative Fish and Wildlife Service and state of Maine project.
Maine, Jonesport 1954

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Last Updated:
November 10, 2017