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NOAA's Historic Fisheries Collection
Catalog of Images

5700 thumbnail picture
Seattle laboratory fisheries scientist with dungeness crabs (Cancer magister)
Washington, Seattle
5701 thumbnail picture
Male dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
5702 thumbnail picture
The dungeness crab (Cancer magister)
5703 thumbnail picture
Experimental clam farm protected from crab predators by 300-foot circular fence.
Massachusetts, Newburyport, Plum Island Sound 1953 June
5704 thumbnail picture
The smallest, average, and largest hard clams and cockles, grown for the same length of time at two apprently similar stations, illustrating the superiority of the environment at the e station.
Connecticut, Milford 1957
5705 thumbnail picture
An experimental setup to observe simultaneously various aspects of the behavior of juvenile clams kept at five different temperatures.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
5706 thumbnail picture
Biologist working in a clam hatchery.
5707 thumbnail picture
The Sam's Cove anti-crab fence. This low wire fence, specially designed by clam investigations at Boothbay Harbor Laboratory to exclude predatory green crabs from soft clam producing flats, had been maintained for over five years at the time of this photograph. The fence encloses 3-4 acres and is over 500 feet in circumference.
Maine, Bremen 1960 April
5708 thumbnail picture
Portion of clam flats at Sam's Cove illustrating excellent survival of clams within the fenced area (siphon holes at left) and no survival outside (right side.)
Maine, Bremen 1960 April
5709 thumbnail picture
Difference in size of clams grown for ten weeks in sea water (control) and in two different concentrations of green algae, Chlorella. Experiments indicated that the presence of large numbers of food organisms in the water is undesirable .
Connecticut, Milford 1960
5710 thumbnail picture
Harry Davis, Fishery Research Biologist at the Milford Laboratory, changes water in cultures of clam larvae every other day and then adds food. Glass, plastic, and stainless steel equipment is necessary as larvae are killed by ions from other metals such as copper.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
5711 thumbnail picture
Soft-shell clams planted at 50 per square foot inside and outside crab fence at Jonesport. A cooperative Fish and Wildlife Service and state of Maine project.
Maine, Jonesport 1954
5712 thumbnail picture
Clams protected by fence survived but those outside of fence were eaten by green crabs within a few weeks.
Maine, Jonesport 1954
5713 thumbnail picture
Pesticide barrier to keep out green crabs
Maine, Jonesport 1960
5714 thumbnail picture
Soft-shell clam anatomy in FWS BCF Circular 162
1962
5715 thumbnail picture
The blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). A female is shown at the top and a male below. The female's claws are tipped with red and the male's with blue.
1965
5716 thumbnail picture
The range of the blue crab includes the entire Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the United States. It is not very abundant north of Delaware Bay and the commercial fishery extends from New Jersey to Texas. As of 1965, over 75% of the total landings was caught in the 4 states shown in cross-hatching.
5717 thumbnail picture
The sex of the blue crab is easily recognizable by the shape of the abdomen. It is triangular in the immature female (top), semi-circular in the adult female ( center), and T-shaped in the male.
1965
5718 thumbnail picture
The male blue crab cradles his legs around the female and carries her about with him for 2 or 3 days before and after mating. At this time they are known to watermen as "doublers" or "buck and rider."
5719 thumbnail picture
Sponge crab. A female blue crab with a mass of eggs attached beneath her abdomen, where she carries them until they hatch. The so-called "sponge" may contain up to 2 million eggs.
5720 thumbnail picture
A zoea, the first larval form of the blue crab. The zoea sheds 6 or 7 times before entering the second larval form, known as a megalops. ( From Costlow and Bookhout)
5721 thumbnail picture
A megalops, the second larval form of the blue crab. The megalops sheds once to become a miniature of its parents. (From Costlow and Bookhout.)
5722 thumbnail picture
Molting. the blue crab shown here has just begun to back out of its old shell. The new shell will stretch and smooth out as the crab absorbs water and will end up about 25 % larger than the former shell.
5723 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Crab pot. The crabs are attracted by the bait held in the cylindrical container and enter through the funnel-shaped openings, but find it hard to escape. Drawing by Curtis Lewis BCF.
5724 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Trotline. Sketch of a typical trotline being fished. Shows the anchored and buoyed line, with baits in place, passing over roller on the side of the boat. The fisherman dip nets the crabs as they are brought to the surface. (From Cargo.)
5725 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Crab dredge. Pulled behind a boat, this device digs the crabs out of the mud, where they bury to escape the cold. This is about the only way of obtaining crabs in lower Chesapeake Bay during the winter.
5726 thumbnail picture
Picking the meat from bule crabs is still a tedious, hand operation. If machines can be built to do this economically, it will help the industry expand. This is a scene from the picking room of the Luther Lewis and Son Crab Co.
North Carolina, Davis 1965 summer
5727 thumbnail picture
Crab floats. Peeler crabs are held in these floats until they shed and can be sold as soft shell crabs.
North Carolina, Core Sound 1961
5728 thumbnail picture
A biologist of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries collecting urine from a blue crab for use in a study of the composition of body fluids. The crab's urinary opening is at the base of the antenna.
5729 thumbnail picture
Artwork. The blue crab (Callinectes sapidus). After Rathbun.
5730 thumbnail picture
Jonah crab. The Jonah crab is caught in waters off New England.
5731 thumbnail picture
The Bird Automatic Meat Extractor
Massachusetts, Walpole 1972
5732 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Deep sea red crab (Geryon Quinquedens)
5733 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Stone crab (Menippe mercenaria)
5734 thumbnail picture
Large male dungeness crab.
Alaska, Ketchikan 1952 September 18
5735 thumbnail picture
Female dungeness crab.
Alaska, Ketchikan 1952 September 22
5736 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Rock crab (Cancer irroratus)
1943
5737 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Stone crab (Menippe mercenarius)
5738 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Green crab (Carcinus maenas)
5739 thumbnail picture
King crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus)
Alaska March 1967
5740 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Stone crab (Menippe mercenarius)
5741 thumbnail picture
Artwork. Rock crab (Cancer irroratus)
5742 thumbnail picture
Large male dungeness crab.
Alaska, Clarence Strait 1952 September 19
5743 thumbnail picture
Male dungeness crab- front view.
Alaska, Ketchikan 1952 September 18
5744 thumbnail picture
Hermit crab
Pacific Ocean, Wake Island 1923 August 4
5745 thumbnail picture
Unloading blue crabs
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
5746 thumbnail picture
Weighing blue crabs
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
5747 thumbnail picture
Bushel basket full of blue crabs
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
5748 thumbnail picture
Bushel basket full of blue crabs
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
5749 thumbnail picture
Commercial type crab pot is used in exploration to determine the distirbution and abundance of commercially valuable invertebrates.
Alaska

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014