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NOAA's Historic Fisheries Collection
Catalog of Images

1400 thumbnail picture
Constituents of a plankton sample.
Maine, Boothbay Harbor 1971 curca
1401 thumbnail picture
The Gulf V plankton sampler. This high-speed sampler has been successfully employed in the larval shrimp study of the Galveston Biological Laboratory.
Texas, Galveston
1402 thumbnail picture
Fish eggs and invertebrates in plankton sample from the California current.
California, La Jolla 1971 circa
1403 thumbnail picture
A modern plankton net used in collecting fish eggs and larvae.
Massachusetts, Woods Hole 1967
1404 thumbnail picture
Two one-meter nets of different mesh size are hauled side by side in order to determine the extent of loss of smaller organisms through the mesh openings of the standard plankton net used on CalCOFI cruises.
California, La Jolla 1960 April
1405 thumbnail picture
Sampling for plankton from the shore
Texas, Galveston
1406 thumbnail picture
Open house participants amazed by display of live plankton.
1407 thumbnail picture
Examining a culture of marine phytoplankton grown in radioactive seawater under controlled conditions of light and temperature.
North Carolina, Beaufort 1960 April
1408 thumbnail picture
Plankton nets for sampling post-larval shrimp at different levels.
Texas, Galveston
1409 thumbnail picture
Apparatus used in collecting samples of bottom organisms including Van Veen grab sampler, Digby scoop, Digby scallop drag, and sled net.
1410 thumbnail picture
Contract shrimp trawler MISS ANGELA with Gulf V plankton sampler being lifted aboard.
Texas, Galveston 1961
1411 thumbnail picture
The Beyer sled, used to sample plankton occurring near the sea bottom.
Texas
1412 thumbnail picture
The three-celled counting chamber was designed to fulfill a specific need in the study of variations in the distribution of very small zooplankters. This need was to be able to describe the mechanisms underlying the distribution and movements of sardines, it was necessary to precisely determine the distribution of their food which consist primarily of small zooplankters.
California, La Jolla 1960 April
1413 thumbnail picture
Retrieving a serial plankton sampler aboard the NOAA Research vessel DAVID STARR JORDAN. Samples taken measure the vertical distribution of plankton .
1414 thumbnail picture
Plankton sampling on the ALBATROSS IV. Snow flakes flying giving indication of miserable working conditions. Note classic Sou'wester on left-most crewman.
Massachusetts, Georges Bank ? 1964 January
1415 thumbnail picture
Plankton sampler aboard R/V SISCOWET.
Lake Superior 1965 Circa
1416 thumbnail picture
Plankton winch on the BCF ship HUGH M. SMITH.
Pacific Ocean 1965 Circa
1417 thumbnail picture
A gas flow geiger counter used to determine the carbon 14 incorporated in phytoplankton during measurements of their rate of photosynthesis in the BCF Radiological Laboratory at Beaufort, N.C.
North Carolina, Beaufort 1965 Circa
1418 thumbnail picture
Deploying a discrete plankton sampler from the BCF Ship GERONIMO . Up to five used. Conrad Mahnken is deploying the net.
1419 thumbnail picture
Deployed plankton dragnet.
1420 thumbnail picture
1-meter plankton net aboard the ALBATROSS IV
1421 thumbnail picture
High-speed plankton samplers are used aboard the USBCF vessel MURRE II to determine changes in distribution and abundance of zooplankton. These small animals are important sources of food for young salmon once they enter salt water. The distribution and abundance of plankton is partially controlled by water temperature, salinity, and ocean currents.
1422 thumbnail picture
Marine biologists setting a plankton net.
Alaska 1964
1423 thumbnail picture
Reading sea water surface temperature from bucket.
Alaska 1964
1424 thumbnail picture
Preserving plankton samples collected with G-V plankton net mounted on runners to permit sampling within 4 feet of the ocean bottom.
Texas
1425 thumbnail picture
Plankton samples collected on the ALBATROSS IV
Massachusetts 1963 circa
1426 thumbnail picture
The Gulf V plankton sampler
1427 thumbnail picture
The Miller high-speed plankton sampler
1963 circa
1428 thumbnail picture
Filtering plankton from a Nansen bottle sample in the chemistry laboratory of ALBATROSS IV
1429 thumbnail picture
Examination of zooplankton samples for indicators of water masses at the USBCF Booth Bay Harbor laboratory.
Maine, Boothbay Harbor
1430 thumbnail picture
Washing Gulf V plankton sampler. These nets are used to collect microscopic plant and animal life which are primary foods of many larger fish and shellfish.
Texas, Galveston 1961, June
1431 thumbnail picture
Removing sample cup from Gulf V plankton sampler.
Texas, Galveston
1432 thumbnail picture
Collecting plankton samples at sea aboard a chartered shrimp trawler to determine the distribution and abundance of the larval and early postlarval stages of commercial shrimp.
Texas, Galveston 1964
1433 thumbnail picture
The diatom Gyrosigma acuminatum collected from Lake Huron in 1956. Diatoms are major constituents of Great Lakes plankton and also are important in the diets of larval sea lampreys.
Michigan, Lake Huron 1956
1434 thumbnail picture
Phytoplankton dominated by Ahlosphaera with Ceratium longipes from a surface haul.
Canada, Nova Scotia, Shelburne 1956 circa
1435 thumbnail picture
Plankton dominated by the Ctenophore Pleurobrachia pileus with a barnacle (Balanus) larvae in the 'nauplius" stage. Figure 19. An unusually rich catch of haddock eggs with glassworm Sagitta elegans, the pteropod Limacina retroversa, Calanus, and other copepods.
1956 circa
1436 thumbnail picture
Mid-winter phytoplankton in the inner part of the bay -- dominated by the diatom genus Coscinodiscus with Chaetoceras, the peridinian Ceratium longipes, and microcopepods. Magnified X 40.
1950 Circa
1437 thumbnail picture
Zooplankton from southern slope of Georges Bank. Plankton dominated by juvenile amphipods (Euthemisto). Magnified X 9.
Massachusetts, Georges Bank 1950 Circa
1438 thumbnail picture
Zooplankton from Massachusetts Bay. Top Calanus finmarhicus from 30-0 meters. Bottom: dominated by Sagitta elegans from 80 meters. Striking example of vertical stratification.
Massachusetts Bay 1950 Circa
1439 thumbnail picture
Peridinian plankton dominated by Peridinium, with Ceratium longipes and C. arctica. From a surface haul, magnified X 40.
Maine, Gulf of Maine 1950 Circa
1440 thumbnail picture
Collecting plankton
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
1441 thumbnail picture
Collecting plankton samples
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
1442 thumbnail picture
Setting plankton net
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
1443 thumbnail picture
Removing plankton bottle.
Virginia, Franklin City 1968 August
1444 thumbnail picture
Plankton net being launched at night from the BCF research ship CHARLES H. GILBERT by personnel of the BCF Biological Laboratory at Honolulu. The flow meter centered in the mouth of the net measures the amount of water flowing through the fine-meshed cone, and from this an estimate of the abundance of zooplankton can be made.
Tropical Pacific Ocean 1969 Circa
1445 thumbnail picture
Optical comparator being used for enumeration of invertebrate organisms in connection with in situ behavior studies. This instrument, which can project images on a 12-inch screen, is also used for training plankton sorters in identification of fish eggs and larvae.
California, La Jolla Laboratory 1965 Circa
1446 thumbnail picture
Optical comparator assembly for imaging plankton. Please note microscope projection stage. The image appears on the screen in its true natural colors.
California, La Jolla Laboratory 1965 Circa
1447 thumbnail picture
Underwater oil emission from Pan American platform "Dillon" . This oil spill began on May 18. The Coast Guard Cutter SEDGE is standing by. The oil slick was 1/4 mile wide and many miles long.
Alaska, Cook Inlet 1968, May 19
1448 thumbnail picture
Oil spill and trash intermingled
1449 thumbnail picture
Indication of fish kill from oil spill

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Last Updated:
November 10, 2017