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NOAA's Historic Fisheries Collection
Catalog of Images

4500 thumbnail picture
Fur seal bulls at the Polovina Rookery
Alaska, Pribilof Islands, St. Paul Island
4501 thumbnail picture
Polovina Rookery
Alaska, Pribilof Islands, St. Paul Island
4502 thumbnail picture
Fur seal bull tossing cow back to harem on the Kitovi Rookery
Alaska, Pribilof Islands, St. Paul Island
4503 thumbnail picture
Fur seal harem
Alaska, Pribilof Islands, St. Paul Island
4504 thumbnail picture
Hauling in beach seine by horse teams.
Oregon, Astoria 1935 ?
4505 thumbnail picture
Oyster tonging
Maryland, Oxford 1967 November 14
4506 thumbnail picture
Average annual production of oysters in pounds showing decline when comparing 1893-1902 (164.9 million pounds) vs. 1943-1952 (76.8 million pounds)
1953
4507 thumbnail picture
Average annual production of oysters in pounds showing relative percentages of oyster harvest for various areas when comparing 1893-1902 vs. 1943-1952.
1953
4508 thumbnail picture
Oyster boat
4509 thumbnail picture
Apparatus to study the effects of the addition of food to sea water on the growth of recently-set oysters.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4510 thumbnail picture
A specially-designed ice-breaking dock to permit handling of experimental animals in northern climate during winter. The sheet of ice setting over this dock in winter is broken at low tide. Therefore, it leaves the open space over the dock, which allows handling of baskets suspended from the dock.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4511 thumbnail picture
A harrow adapted for underwater use to cover oyster drills and other enemies of commercial mollusks with a layer of bottom deposit. This method of mechanical control of drills is being widely tested in Long Island Sound. Outside of establishment of Mansfield and Sons.
Connecticut, Fair Haven 1960
4512 thumbnail picture
Biologists examining and measuring juvenile oysters suspended in baskets from a specially constructed dock.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4513 thumbnail picture
A polyethylene sheet serves as a support spread on soft, muddy bottom for oyster shells.
Connecticut, Milford 1959
4514 thumbnail picture
Biologist trying various combinations of plastics and other materials to develop cheap but effective oyster spat collectors.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4515 thumbnail picture
Artificial and natural oyster spat-collecting materials ready to be suspended for a test in sea water.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4516 thumbnail picture
Abnormally swollen oyster drills after contact with a chemical intended to be used for their control
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4517 thumbnail picture
Experiment designed to devise a method to protect recently-set oysters from drills by spreading chemically treated sand over the bed. Drills became quickly swollen and unable to move, while young oysters remained apparently unaffected.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4518 thumbnail picture
Creating a barrier of chemically treated sand around an experimental oyster bed in Long Island Sound.
Connecticut, Milford 1960
4519 thumbnail picture
Testing plastic collectors to secure oyster ste.
1957
4520 thumbnail picture
Preparing collectors for obtaining oyster set in articial salt water ponds.
1957
4521 thumbnail picture
Changing water containing oyster larvae in experiments devised to determine the qualitative and quantitative requirements of these larvae.
1957
4522 thumbnail picture
A battery of large glass containers in which various types of larval food are grown.
1957
4523 thumbnail picture
Ripe oysters individually marked and each in a separate container ready to be induced to spawn, to provide material for studies on physiological and ecological requirements of oyster larvae.
1957
4524 thumbnail picture
Spawning of individual oysters to select race most suitable for pond propagation
1957
4525 thumbnail picture
Growth of recently set oysters fed equal volumes of different foods. The average initial length of the oysters was 0.8 mm. After four weeks of feeding, the average size of the oysters reanged from 0.8 mm, for those fed poor food (Amphidinium), to 5.2 mm, for those fed good food (Cryptomonad #2).
1957
4526 thumbnail picture
General view of artificial pond used in experiments on propagation of European oysters. Structure in center contains spawning oysters and shells to collect spat. Pond only partially filled with water at time of photo.
1957
4527 thumbnail picture
Closeup of special structure in middle of artificial pond, to keep spawning oysters. Pond only partially filled with water at time of photo.
1957
4528 thumbnail picture
Changing set bags for studies of intensity of oyster setting in natural oyster pond.
Massachusetts, Martha's Vineyard 1957
4529 thumbnail picture
Oyster reef. A solid bank of "coon" oysters exposed at low tide.
Georgia coast 1960 circa
4530 thumbnail picture
Where spawning conditions are good, oysters in their natural state will attach themselves, one generation on top of another, until great ridges of them exist up to the high tide level. These oysters are of little value as they are of poor quality. They can be improved greatly by spreading them out so that they can grow to desirable market sizes
South Carolina 1960 circa
4531 thumbnail picture
Oyster drills - destructive to oysters. The small drill is Tritonallia japonica and the larger is Thais camellora. Both are from Samish Bay, Japan.
4532 thumbnail picture
The oyster drill Urosalpinx cinerea.
4533 thumbnail picture
Interior view of a B & O refrigerator car showing loading of oysters.
Washington, D. C. 1947 June 2
4534 thumbnail picture
Apparatus used in recording shell movement and pumping rate of oysters in the Galveston sea water laboratory.
Texas, Galveston 1961
4535 thumbnail picture
Placing tray of oysters in area subject to recent oyster mortality. Part of a joint Maryland, Virginia, and Federal oyster mortality monitoring program in mid-Atlantic waters.
Virginia, Chincoteague Bay 1959
4536 thumbnail picture
Biologist working with cultures of algae used for feeding oysters.
4537 thumbnail picture
Sampling tools, oyster dredge measuring cups and tubs used in the quantitative mortality survey of Chesapeake Bay oyster reefs.
1960 April
4538 thumbnail picture
Oyster biologists from BCF, Maryland Department of Research and Education, and Maryland Department of Tidewater Fisheries checking incidence and distribution of oyster mortality in Chesapeake Bay.
Maryland, Annapolis area 1960 April
4539 thumbnail picture
Illustration accompanying growth and life history of the oyster drills Eupleura caudata and Urosalpinx cinerea. Drilled oysters are also shown.
4540 thumbnail picture
Oyster dredge in operation
Connecticut, Milford
4541 thumbnail picture
Oyster dredge on Chesapeake Bay skipjack.
Maryland, Oxford 1961 November 14
4542 thumbnail picture
Oyster dredge on Chesapeake Bay skipjack.
Maryland, Oxford 1961 November 14
4543 thumbnail picture
Sectioning oyster tissue for examination of parasites
Maryland, Oxford 1961 November 15
4544 thumbnail picture
Studies to control predatory activities of oyster drills. Lower than normal water salinity or temperature retards feeding and other activities of drills. In practical applications, oysters could be raised in waters with lower than normal salinities or temperatures, thus reducing the predation of drills.
Connecticut, Milford 1968 September
4545 thumbnail picture
Laboratory set-up for studies of effects of water of different salinities upon growth, reproduction, feeding and survival of oyster drills.
1957
4546 thumbnail picture
Dead oyster shell with oyster drill hole prominently showing.
Maryland, Oxford 1967
4547 thumbnail picture
Oyster aquaculture studies
Maryland, Oxford 1972
4548 thumbnail picture
Oyster drill (Urosalpinx cinerea folliensus) depositing egg capsule on tank wall. This animal is a giant species found in Chincoteague Bay.
Maryland, Oxford 1960 April
4549 thumbnail picture
Dr. Takaski Ino of the Tokyo University Fisheries Laboratory at Kominato is an abalone expert. In: FWS BCF Circular 168 by John Glude.
Japan 1964

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Last Updated:
November 10, 2017