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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

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Methane bubbles rising from a seep area.
Gulf of Mexico, Biloxi Dome 2012 April 18
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Three bubbles of less dense than water hydrocarbon gas and fluids escaping from an oil, gas, and brine seep area. The left-most bubbles seem to have escaping material that is leaving a trail of the bubble trajectories through the water column.
2012 April 20
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A closeup of a bubble of hydrocarbon gas and fluids escaping from an oil, gas, and brine seep area.
2012 April 20
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Small mounds or volcanoes around the periphery of a brine pool rose small heights (centimeters) from the seafloor. Some of these small volcanoes were emitting gas, probably also mixed with liquid hydrocarbons and brine. Is the brown material covering the black oil a mineral precipitate or is it of biological origin?
Gulf of Mexico, Green Canyon, Ewing Block 915 2012 April 20
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A small "volcano" around the periphery of a brine pool rose small heights (centimeters) from the seafloor. Some of these small volcanoes were emitting gas, probably also mixed with liquid hydrocarbons and brine. Note the bubble of gas rising from the small volcano reflecting the lights of Little Hercules giving an illusion of eyes staring back at the camera.
Gulf of Mexico, Green Canyon, Ewing Block 915 2012 April 20
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Globules of tar and white bacterial mat at a natural oil seep. The white specks seen above the black background are probably copepods. In the left upper center a bristleworm is crawling over the bacterial mat.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Globules of tar and white bacterial mat at a natural oil seep. The white specks seen above the black background are probably copepods. The bristle worm seen in image expl8356 has moved further up the mound and can be seen in the upper center of the image. This movement occurred over a period of six minutes between images.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Globules of tar and white bacterial mat at a natural oil seep. The white specks seen above the black background are probably copepods.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Amphipod and translucent worm tube associated with white spongy material at oil seep site on the seafloor.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Filaments of bacterial material and white mats of bacteria material at a natural oil seep site on the seafloor.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Small tar stalagmite appearing structures caused by a natural oil seep on the seafloor.
2012 April 24
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Stalagmites of tar rise from the seafloor with a surrounding white bacterial mat.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Small tar stalagmite appearing structures caused by a natural oil seep on the seafloor.
2012 April 24
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Stalagmites of tar rise from the seafloor with a surrounding white bacterial mat.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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Small tar stalagmite appearing structures caused by a natural oil seep on the seafloor.
2012 April 24
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Stalagmites of tar rise from the seafloor with a surrounding white bacterial mat.
Gulf of Mexico, Sigsbee Escarpment 2012 April 24
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An aggregation of vestimentiferan tubeworms (Lamellibrachia sp.). Such aggregations provide habitat for smaller animals such as the small white anemones covering the tube worm tubes, and the shrimps Alvinocaris muricola. The tiny white spots all around the tubeworms are copepods, tiny swimming crustaceans.
Gulf of Mexico, Green Canyon, Ewing Block 915 2012 April 20
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A close-up of black coral (Bathypathes sp.), multiple yellow (Paramuricea sp.) amd red (top right of image; Swiftia sp.) corals as the TowCam came very close to this scarp at 1,679 meters in Gilbert Canyon.
Gilbert Canyon
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Orange brisingid sea stars (Freyella sp.) are common on sedimented rock at 1,703 meters in southwestern Toms Canyon.
New Jersey, Southwestern Toms Canyon 2012
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A bythitid fish snakes its way through a cluster of brightly colored corals and brittle stars.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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Witch flounder, a flatfish seen on level bottom habitats which, like the goosefish, relies on camouflage to hide itself. Even in the deep sea where very little sunlight penetrates, color, texture, and concealment remain important.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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A small fish of the family Bythitidae pokes its head out near a brisingid sea star and hard coral skeleton. Galatheoid crabs inhabit the live bubblegum coral to the left.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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This strange looking, unidentified species of deep-sea shark was seen several times at a particular ledge system in Norfolk Canyon.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 19
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Eels of the genus Dysommina were common at many hard vertical walls, and seemed to prefer entwining themselves in corals along with the bythitid fish.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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A goosefish, a type of anglerfish, lying in wait on the flat seafloor.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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A fish of the family Oreosomatidae, or oreo for short, gliding along the canyon wall.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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Blackbelly rosefish - these striking fish are fairly common in the rocky canyon habitats. Related to scorpionfish, the blackbelly rosefish is an ambush hunter and possesses venomous dorsal spines to deter predators.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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Jason briefly caught this larger shark swimming along a rock wall. A fishing hook can be seen embedded in the shark's mouth, one of many signs of human interference found in the canyons.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 19
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The diversity of coral species on the canyon walls was quite high at times. Here three species grow together on a single outcrop - Desmophyllum (white, bottom), Acanthogorgia (light green), and Solenosmilia (white stony coral just visible at right).
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 17
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Cup corals, also known as Cockscomb coral, Demophyllum dianthus, growing around an anemone on a mud-covered ledge.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 17
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A cross-section view of Desmophyllum, revealing its internal structure. The life history of the cup corals collected will be studied extensively after the expedition. Large specimens, such as this, were cut in half with a diamond blade then subsampled for studies on cup coral genetics, nutrition, reproduction , age and growth. Their skeletons provide insight into past ocean conditions.
Maryland, Baltimore Canyon 2013 May 17
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A black coral growing on a vertical wall. Black corals are named for the color of their skeleton, while their tissues take on vibrant hues ranging from red to yellow or white. One family of black corals, Leiopathes, has been found to survive over 4,000 years, making them among the longest-lived organisms on the planet.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 16
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A coral skeleton, likely Primnoa, collected by Jason and photographed in the wet lab. Its branching pattern and growth structure resemble that of trees on land .
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 16
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A cluster of two species of deep-sea coral skeletons grown together: the thin branched top is likely Solenosmilia while the circular bottom "cups" are Desmophyllum. The dark green dead skeletons can support live coral (white), and provide scientists a timeline of growth that can span decades.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 16
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Close-up of the coral branch in expl8380, showing a cross-section of its growth bands. At very high resolution, one can count these annual growth bands to determine age. This particular species deposits both a carbonate (light) and proteinacious (dark) material to form its skeleton.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 16
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Many different species of invertebrates live together on the steep canyon walls of the Mid-Atlantic continental slope. Here an octopus, sea star, bivalves, and dozens of cup corals all share the same overhang. The cup corals are Desmophyllum, one of the species targeted by geneticists for taxonomic study.
2013 May 13
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Flabellum, a solitary cup coral, with its tentacles extended into the water column. Like other deep-water corals, Flabellum's evolutionary history and closest relatives are hard to discern..
2013 May 13
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A small cluster of Lophelia coral growing on a vertical rock wall in Norfolk Canyon. Lophelia is capable of forming large deepwater reefs in some areas.
2013 May 13
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A squat lobster makes its home among various deep-sea corals. Though most galatheoids share a similar body structure and general appearance, there are many different species.
2013 May 13
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Close-up of a crinoid attached to a bubblegum coral (Paragorgia). The coral's polyps are extended in feeding position. Both animals capture small organisms and organic matter in the water column as it drifts by.
2013 May 11
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Wet lab photograph of a Primnoa sample with a shark or skate egg case attached , collected in 2012.
2012
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Red bubblegum coral (Paragorgia) and several colonies of Primnoa occupy a boulder in close proximity to an anemone and sea star at approximately 440 meters in Norfolk Canyon.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 11
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A lithodid crab seen on the mussel bed at 1,600 meters depth.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 8
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Methane gas bubbles rise from the seafloor - this type of activity, originally noticed by the NOAA Ship OKEANOS EXPLORER in 2012 on a multibeam sonar survey, is what led scientists to the area.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 8
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The Jason ROV collects a sea urchin and a few mussels from the expansive mussel bed with its manipulator arm.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 8
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This vast mussel community was found on a flat bottom as well as on rocks rising a meter or more off the seafloor.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 8
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A species of rockling (Family Lotidae), related to hakes and cods, rests among the mussels of a large seep community.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 8
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A syllid polychaete worm found within a dead Desmophyllum coral skeleton found along the wall of Norfolk Canyon.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 7
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An unidentified gastropod (family: Columbellidae) collected with Jason's suction sampler from a rock wall at 444 meters.
Virginia, Norfolk Canyon 2013 May 7
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Typical inhabitants found on shipwrecks on the Mid-Atlantic coast. Shipwrecks serve as artificial reefs, hosting a wide variety of fauna including anemones, hydroids (thin yellow strands in this photo), spider crabs, and fish.

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Last Updated:
July 7, 2015