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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

7000 thumbnail picture
1939 chart of the Caribbean by Navy Hydrographic Office showing state of knowledge of bathymetry of the Caribbean and surrounding seas.
7001 thumbnail picture
1939 chart of the Caribbean by Navy Hydrographic Office showing state of knowledge of bathymetry of the Caribbean and surrounding seas.
7002 thumbnail picture
1939 chart of the Caribbean by Navy Hydrographic Office showing state of knowledge of bathymetry of the Caribbean and surrounding seas.
7003 thumbnail picture
Spectacular cross-section of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge clearly showing median valley obtained as the result of soundings taken on the German research vessel METEOR. This profile and the accompanying paper by Gunter Dietrich clearly establishes Dietrich as the first to recognize the continuity of the median valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. 1938 original publication.
7004 thumbnail picture
Profiles surmising the continuity of what are now called abyssal hills in the vicinity of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Illustration strikingly similar to tracing continuity of magnetic anomaly pattern. Produced by Gunter Dietrich 1938.
7005 thumbnail picture
Title page of "Some Morphological Results of the Cruise of the "METEOR" January to May 1938" by Gunther Dietrich. Published in International Hydrograph ic Review 1939. This article clearly establishes Gunther Dietrich as the first to note the median valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Pp. 52-55.
7006 thumbnail picture
2nd page of "Some Morphological Results of the Cruise of the "METEOR" January to May 1938" by Gunther Dietrich. Published in International Hydrograph ic Review 1939. This article clearly establishes Gunther Dietrich as the first to note the median valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Pp. 52-55.
7007 thumbnail picture
3nd page of "Some Morphological Results of the Cruise of the "METEOR" January to May 1938" by Gunther Dietrich. Published in International Hydrograph ic Review 1939. This article clearly establishes Gunther Dietrich as the first to note the median valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Pp. 52-55. Note the final paragraph of this page.
7008 thumbnail picture
4th page of "Some Morphological Results of the Cruise of the "METEOR" January to May 1938" by Gunther Dietrich. Published in International Hydrograph ic Review 1939. This article clearly establishes Gunther Dietrich as the first to note the median valley of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Pp. 52-55. Dietrich here describes the parallel undulations marching off the crest of the main ridge.
7009 thumbnail picture
A very small-scale map of the world ocean produced by the International Hydrographic Bureau in 1939. Perhaps because of the patterning, this map has a somewhat odd appearance.
7010 thumbnail picture
Josephine Bank as contoured by Albert Defant in 1939 from acoustic soundings.
7011 thumbnail picture
Section of 1939 North Pacific chart 5486 by Navy Hydrographic Office showing hundreds of seamounts, the true configuration of the Aleutian Trench, and some of the southern seamounts of what became known as the Emperor Seamount Chain extending north from the vicinity of Midway Island.
7012 thumbnail picture
Southeast section of 1939 North Pacific chart 5486 by Navy Hydrographic Office showing use of name Albatross Plateau for East Pacific Rise leading into Gulf of California. It was not until 1960 that H.W. Menard popularized the name East Pacific Rise.
7013 thumbnail picture
Northeast section of 1939 North Pacific chart 5486 by Navy Hydrographic Office showing few of the seamounts surveyed by the C&GS during the years 1925-1939. See images map00126-map00128.
7014 thumbnail picture
C&GS Chart 5101A, 1939, a prototype chart incorporating bathymetry acquired with RAR navigation by the C&GS out to oceanic depths. This chart was meant for navigation by following bottom contours. No other chart like this was ever produced as WWII intervened and the use of electronic navigation systems became widespread. The C&GS surveyed the continental margin of the U.S. by 1939.
7015 thumbnail picture
The famous A.C. Veatch and Paul Smith map of the Mid-Atlantic continental slope which attracted great attention from the scientific world as it showed the results of precision radio acoustic ranging navigation and acoustic sounding. With the exception of Hudson Canyon, none of the other canyons were known at the time of publication of this map.
7016 thumbnail picture
Harold Murray of the C&GS published this pioneering study of undersea mountains 1941. Many of the seamounts depicted on this chart were flat-topped seamounts later termed guyots by Harry Hess of Princeton.
7017 thumbnail picture
Systematic mapping of the Gulf of Alaska by C&GS ships going to and from their Alaska nautical charting surveys led to the discoveries shown in images map00126 and map00128.
7018 thumbnail picture
Flat-topped seamounts, later termed guyots, as noted by Harold Murray of the C&GS.
7019 thumbnail picture
The discovery survey of Astoria Canyon off the Oregon coast. The lines of dots are lines of soundings navigated by means of radio-acoustic ranging, the first precision navigation system to eliminate the need for visual signals. This system was developed by the C&GS in the 1920's and used until WWII. Many discoveries were made because of it.
7020 thumbnail picture
Monterey Canyon as published by George Davidson in 1897. This canyon was the second canyon ever discovered, Hueneme Canyon being first in 1855 and Monterey Canyon in 1857. In: "The Submerged Valleys of the Coast of California", Proceedings of California Academy of Sciences, Series, Vol.1, No. 2.
7021 thumbnail picture
Hueneme Canyon as published by George Davidson in 1897. This canyon was the first submarine canyon ever discovered and was found as the result of United States Coast Survey hydrographic surveys in 1855. In: "The Submerged Valleys of the Coast of California", Proceedings of California Academy of Sciences, Series, Vol.1, No. 2.
7022 thumbnail picture
Gulf of Mexico bathymetric map ca. 1888. All deep soundings are from work of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BLAKE. This map is one of the first to have relatively high density sounding information. The Coast Survey had taken thousands of soundings which were culled down to produce this map.
United States, Gulf of Mexico
7023 thumbnail picture
Gulf of Mexico bathymetric map ca. 1888. All deep soundings are from work of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Steamer BLAKE. This map is one of the first to have relatively high density sounding information. The Coast Survey had taken thousands of soundings which were culled down to produce this map. This map is reproduced in Alexander Agassiz's "Three Cruises of the BLAKE."
7024 thumbnail picture
Perhaps the first three-dimensional image of a portion of the deep ocean. This map was produced from soundings primarily obtained by the C&GS Steamer BLAKE. An early rendition of this model is found in the C&GS Annual Report for 1884. This image is found in Alexander Agassiz's "Three Cruises of the BLAKE" published in 1888.
7025 thumbnail picture
The Mendocino Escarpment as compiled by Harold Murray of the Coast and Geodetic Survey and reproduced in the Bulletin of the Association of Field Engineers in 1938. This is the first hint at the nature of what later were termed fracture zones by H.W. Menard in the 1950's.
7026 thumbnail picture
Davidson Seamount, the first undersea feature to be officially termed a seamount by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. This feature was surveyed by the C&GS in in 1933 and named in honor of the great Coast Survey West Coast pioneer George Davidson, 1825-1911.
7027 thumbnail picture
This excerpt from International Aspects of Oceanography, an NSF publication, was written by Wayland Vaughn of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1937 and describes the contribution of both echo-sounding and the navigation system termed Radio-Acoustic Ranging (RAR) to the mapping of the seafloor. RAR was developed by the C&GS and used to survey U.S.continental margins in the 1930's.
7028 thumbnail picture
Names and features overlay to map produced by International Hydrographic Organization as shown in image map00119. Note tracing of ridges on this 1939 overlay.
World Ocean
7029 thumbnail picture
The prototype 3-D image of the seafloor developed by Heezen and Tharp. Note the similarity to the Veatch and Smith map in image map00125. The Veatch and Smith map had been produced as a 3-D relief model by the Braund Reliefograph, a machine developed within the C&GS to produce relief models for WWII bombardiers and pilots.
Atlantic Ocean, Northwest
7030 thumbnail picture
Portion of the Pacific Ocean physiographic map published by H. W. Menard in his 1964 publication 'Marine Geology of the Pacific."
Pacific Ocean, Juan de Fuca Ridge area
7031 thumbnail picture
Portion of map showing axis of Mid-Atlantic Rift Valley as interpreted by Bruce Heezen, Marie Tharp, and Maurice Ewing
Atlantic Ocean
7032 thumbnail picture
Portion of physiographic diagram of Mid-Atlantic Ridge by Bruce Heezen and Marie Tharp
Atlantic Ocean
7033 thumbnail picture
Overlapping spreading center at 12 54 North Latitude on the East Pacific Rise.
Pacific Ocean, East Pacific Rise
7034 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Zealandia Bank.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7035 thumbnail picture
3-D view of West Rota Volcano.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7036 thumbnail picture
3-D view of the continental slope and Cape Fear Diapir on the continental slope off North Carolina. This map also shows a huge submarine slide with its headwall noted by the scarps on the left of the image.
Atlantic Ocean, North Carolina offshore
7037 thumbnail picture
Bathymetric map of Blake Ridge Diapir
Atlantic Ocean, South Carolina offshore
7038 thumbnail picture
Ocean trenches and volcanic arcs of the western Pacific Ocean from the Equator to 40 North
Pacific Ocean
7039 thumbnail picture
The Southern Mariana Back-arc Spreading Center showing location of a large hydrothermal plume
Pacific Ocean, Mariana Islands area
7040 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Astoria Canyon, west of the Columbia River entrance showing locations of science transects (appear as colored ribbons on canyon walls)
Pacific Ocean, Oregon offshore
7041 thumbnail picture
Full disc map of Pacific Ocean showing location of Submarine Ring of Fire Expeditions from 2002 through 2006
Pa
7042 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Pioneer Seamount and Pioneer Canyon on the California coast showing cable route to Pioneer Seamount hydrophone installation.
7043 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Seamount-X.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7044 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Ruby Seamount.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7045 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Northwest Rota Volcano.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7046 thumbnail picture
3-D view of an un-named bank and the slopes of Lisianski Island in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. The tops of these features are in shallow water or break the surface so no data is available giving the impression of hollow seamounts.
7047 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Northwest Eifuku Volcano.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7048 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Nikko Volcano.
Pacific Ocean, Northern Mariana Islands
7049 thumbnail picture
3-D view of Lyman Seamount. North Atlantic Stepping Stones 2005 Expedition. The map shows the entire East Corner Rise seamount complex, tentatively named Lyman Seamount.
Atlantic Ocean, Corner Seamount complex 2005

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013