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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

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Acoustic equipment used on merchant vessels ca. 1920's.
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A full-size replica of William Beebe's bathysphere on display at Mystic Seaport Aquarium.
Connecticut, Mystic Seaport
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Cover of "Instruction Book for Contour Scanning Set AN/SQN-1" 1949. Library Call No. 526.99 E24 C76.
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In: "Instruction Book for Contour Scanning Set AN/SQN-1" 1949. Library Call No. 526.99 E24 C76. Relationship of units.
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In: "Instruction Book for Contour Scanning Set AN/SQN-1" 1949. Library Call No. 526.99 E24 C76. General view of electronic stack.
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In: "Instruction Book for Contour Scanning Set AN/SQN-1" 1949. Library Call No. 526.99 E24 C76. Typical contour presentations.
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In: "Instruction Book for Contour Scanning Set AN/SQN-1" 1949. Library Call No. 526.99 E24 C76. Various electronic components.
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In: "Instruction Book for Contour Scanning Set AN/SQN-1" 1949. Library Call No. 526.99 E24 C76. General view of sonar transducer.
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Chain dredge being recovered with bag of volcanic rocks.
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Analog contour printout of Seabeam data neither adjusted for speed of vessel or georeferenced. Color of contours changes every 100-meters. This particular seamount appears to have two distinct peaks and is located at 21 35 N Latitude and 151 45 E Longitude which is northeast of the Mariana Trench.
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Plotted rough contour map of Seabeam data that has been georeferenced. Color of contours changes every 100-meters. This particular seamount appears to have two distinct peaks and is located at 21 35 N Latitude and 151 45 E Longitude which is northeast of the Mariana Trench.
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Submarine sound signaling apparatus in Knight's Modern Seamanship (Seventh Edition 1917). This system was first invented in the early 1900's. Long distance sound transmission in the ocean for navigational purposes preceded the use of acoustics for depth measurement.
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Starfish tile mural on the floor of the Oceanographic Museum at Monaco
Monaco
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Basketstar tile mural on the floor of the Oceanographic Museum at Monaco
Monaco
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Crab tile mural on the floor of the Oceanographic Museum at Monaco
Monaco
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Painting of launch of meteorological kite from stern of Prince Albert's vessel "Princesse Alice."
Monaco
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Bringing dolphin aboard for dissection and study. Prince Albert is the man leaning outward from the rigging.
Monaco
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Tile mural of Prince Albert's ship "Princesse Alice"
Monaco
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Bronze casting of Prince Albert directing the sorting of a dredge haul while on the "Princesse Alice."
Monaco
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Bronze casting of Prince Albert capturing a pilot whale from a whale boat of the "Princesse Alice"
Monaco
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Painting of Prince Albert manning the harpoon cannon while attempting to obtain marine mammal for study
Monaco
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Outside of the Oceanographic Museum at Monaco showing the name of the Coast and Geodetic Survey Ship BLAKE, one of nineteen ships thus honored.
Monaco
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The Oceanographic Museum at Monaco
Monaco
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A bronze casting of the likeness of Prince Albert of Monaco
Monaco
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A marble statue of the likeness of Prince Albert of Monaco
Monaco
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A bronze statue of Prince Albert of Monaco in heavy weather gear while at the helm of one of his vessels.
Monaco
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Catalog of Oceanographic Equipment Contained in the Collection of the Museum of Oceanography of Monaco. 1. "Photometers 2. Current Measuring Devices" by Christian Carpine. Bulletin de l'Institute Oceanographique , Vol. 73, No. 1437. 1987.
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Figure 1. H. Fol and E. Sarasin Photometers. 1. 1884 model. 2. and 3. 1885 model. 4. and 5. 1886 model as published in Fol and Sarasin, 1887. Photometers are instruments to measure light. They are used to study how far light penetrates into the water, sometimes the color of the water, and, also in modern instruments, bioluminescence.
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Figure 2. H. Fol and E. Sarasin photometer, 1884 model. Left: device closed. Right: Device opened. This instrument was used in 1885 to study the penetration of light in Lake Leman and after that in the Mediterranean. It was tried off Cape Ferrat, France, in between 200 and 400 meters water depth.
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Figure 3. H. Fol and E. Sarasin photometer, 1885 model. From top to bottom - Device closed; device open; the surface float. This model was designed to fix the weak point of the preceding model that was not able to execute a sole measurement at a given depth.
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Figure 4. H. Fol and E. Sarasin photometer, 1886 model. This instrument was tested at Villefranche-sur-Mer on board Fol's yacht, the AMPHIASTER. The results were not published.
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Figure 5. P. Regnard's combination photometer and photometric recording device. Invented by Paul Regnard in 1888 for measuring the intensity and duration of lig light with increasing depth. It was used by Prince Albert aboard a steam tug off Funchal at depths of 20, 30, and 40 meters. The balloon pressure device was not part of the original instrument but added afterwards.
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Figure 6. P. Regnard hydrochloric acid tube designed by Paul Regnard about 1889 to study the chemical action of light in oceanic waters.
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Figure 7. E. von Petersen's photometer. Left: device before opening. Middle: device during exposure. Right: device after closing. This device was invented in 1886 by Eugen von Petersen, an engineer at the Naples zoological station. The design follows the specifications of Carl Chun. The first test of this ins trument was by Carl Chun off Capri in 250 meters water depth.
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Figure 8. L. Linsbauer's photometer. Left: a picture of the unit. Right: a picture of the internal photometer mechanism. This instrument was invented by Ludwig Linsbauer for use in fresh water. It was used in Lake Traunsee in the northern part of Austria in 1904 at small depths.
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Figure 9. W. F. Ewald's photometer. The photometer is inverted with the lens uncovered. Invented by Wolfgang F. Ewald about 1908. An earlier instrument of this type is not part of the museum collection. The test of the original was in a lake near Munich and then in a fjord near Bergen.
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Figure 10. W. F. Ewald's photometer. Vibration model activated by shaking the cable that the instrument was attached to. This model was invented by Wolfgang F. Ewald in 1910 and tested near the coast of Scotland.
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Figure 11. W. F. Ewald's photometer, messenger model, at the end of operation. Invented by Wolfgang F. Ewald about 1910 to fix some of the problems of the previous model. First tested about 1910 off the coast of Scotland. Other tests were then made off Capri.
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Figure 12. E. B. Helland-Hansen's photometer. Left: device before opening. Middle: Device during exposure. Right: Device after closing. Invented by Bjorn Helland-Hansen in 1910, this photometer was used aboard the MICHAEL SARS in the North Atlantic. It was first used near the Azores at depths of 500 to 700 meters.
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Figure 13. R. Bertel's spectograph invented by Rudolph Bertel in 1910. This instrument was designed to study the penetration of the various wavelegths of light into the waters off Monaco. The first test of this instrument was aboard the EIDER off Monaco in 1911 in 500 to 600 meters water depth.
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Figure 13. (cont) R. Bertel's spectograph. Left: exposure mechanism before opening. Middle: Exposure mechanism during opening. Right: Exposure mechanism after closure. See image ship4014 for further discussion.
8241 thumbnail picture
Figure 13. (end) R. Bertel's spectograph. The optical device. See image ship4014 for further discussion.
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Figure 14. W. F. Ewald's and K. Grein's photometer. Left: view of the apparatus. Right (from top to bottom): messenger container; removable photographic plates; removable filters. This instrument was designed by Wolfgang F. Ewald with the aid of Klaus Green. It was first tested off Capri and put to the definitive tests off Monaco in up to 500 meters.
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Figure 15. K. Grein's photometer invented and made by Klaus Green in 1912 as part of a series of photometers devised in collaboration with Wolfgang Ewald. This instrument was first tested from the EIDER in 1913 between 500 meters water depth. As a result of these tests, Grein began studies of the penetration of ultra-violet light into the sea.
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Figure 16. J. Richard's photometer. Left: the apparatus. Right, (from top to bottom): exposure mechanism before opening; exposure mechanism during opening; exposure mechanism after opening.
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Figure 17. Luksch disk, made by Joseph Luksch about 1880 and used in that year aboard the HERTA, the yacht of Prince John II of Liechstenstein. It was provided with five interchangeable 36-cm reflecting plates of different metals, some painted. Afterwards, Luksch used polished white iron disks and white painted disks of 45 cm diameter on the POLA.
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Figure 18. Color measuring scale of Francoise-Alphonse Forel. Forel invented this scale in 1887 for the study of the color of water, and precisely for that of Lake Leman. He conducted his first experiments in Lake Leman in 1887.
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Figure 19. Color measuring tube of Julien Thoulet, designed about 1903 to facilitate the use of Forel's color scale. It was only a little more practical than the original form.
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Figure 20. Color measuring lens of Julien Thoulet designed in 1903 as per the intention of Prince Albert 1st of Monaco. Thoulet tested this instrument at the laboratory at Nancy. It is possible that this instrument was also tested on the PRINCESS ALICE II in 1905.
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Figure 21. Oceanographic float devised by Prince Albert of Monaco, 1887 model. These floats were used to study surface currents.

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013