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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

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Figure 19. Apstein's mud sampler - an instrument described in the catalog of the German Section of the International Oceanographic and Marine Fisheries Exposition of 1906 as a sediment sampler although it appears to be more likely that it was meant to be a water sampler used in the study of plankton by Dr. Carl Apstein.
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Plate 4. An integrated model of the dredging devices and gear used aboard the PRINCESSE ALICE II. This model was displayed in the oceanographic and physical instruments display room of the Oceanographic Museum at Monaco about 1910.
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Figure 20. A model devised to demonstrate the quantity of common salt in the sea. The idea is that if all the salt in the sea were to evaporate it would cover an area and volume equal to the above sea-level area and volume of Africa. Dr. Walter Stahlberg conceived this idea as a means to communicate to the public amount of salt in the sea.
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Figure 21. A map of salinity of the surface of the ocean. This map was created by Dr. Walter Stahlberg and mounted and displayed by Max Marx in the windows of the Oceanographic Museum.
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Figure 22. Chemical elements that are dissolved in sea water. Major elements are sodium, magnesium, calcium, potassium, silicon, carbon, sulfur, oxygen, chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Minor elements are titanium, nitrogen, phosphorus , arsenic, boron, rubidium, cesium, lithium, strontium, barium, zinc, copper, silver, gold, aluminum, lead, manganese, iron, cobalt, and nickel.
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Figure 23. Display demonstrating the amount of dissolved gased in sea water. Each glass cube is 1 decimeter cubed in volume. The glass bulbs represent the amount of dissolved quantities of O2, N, and CO2 in the first two at low temperature and high temperature respectively, while the third cube represents the total amount of CO2, both dissolved and in other chemical compounds.
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Figure 24. Quantity of arsenic in marine plants as noted by the French pharmacist and chemist Henri Marcelet as the result of studies at the Oceanographic Museum in 1912.
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Figure 25. Samples of different types of marine sediments. This display was conceived by Professor Julien Thoulet in 1905 to both educate the public but also as guide for sailors who used bottom samples as a guide in piloting.
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Figure 26. Effects of pressure on different types of hollow tubes as studied by John Young Buchanan, both during his experiences on the CHALLENGER expedition and with Prince Albert I of Monaco on the PRINCESS ALICE II in 1902. Buchanan published his study of hyperpressure effects in 1903. The brass tube, copper sphere, and debris from a Portier and Richard bottle were all studied in 1902.
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Figure 27. Model of an Ekman Current Meter. This type of current meter was invented by V. Wilfred Ekman in about 1903. It had a novel method of recording current speed and direction. In effect small marbles were distributed by a drainpipe on the magnetized pointer for recording direction while the number of marbles was proportional to the strength of current.
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Figure 28. Model of a machine for generating electricity based on differences of temperature between the sea surface and great depth. This "thermal machine" was devised by the physicist Georges Claude and the engineer Paul Boucherot in 1926. It was an application of Carnot's theorem and was a forerunner of the modern ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) project.
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Figure 29. Model of the dynanometer with enclosed springs used on the HIRONDELLE . On the left is the assmbled model while on the right is the tension scale showing the tension placed on an oceanographic cable during operations.
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Figure 30. Samples of steel cable used by Prince Albert I of Monaco during his oceanographic studies. Various diameter cables were used with different types equipment at varying depths.
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Figure 31. A model of the deck gear, pullies, and booms used for dredging on the PRINCESSE ALICE II.
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Figure 32. Meteorological kite flown from the PRINCESS ALICE II. Professor Hugo Hergesell of Strasbourg interested Prince Albert in exploring the high atmosphere. As such, the first studies of the upper atmosphere while at sea were conducted off the PRINCESS ALICE II on April 12, 1904, to an altitude of 4500 meters.
Atlantic Ocean 43 35.8 N Lat., 7.75 W Long. 1904 April 12
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Figure 33. Meteorological register used with hydrogen weather balloons flown from the PRINCESSE ALICE II on April 5, 1905 from a station north of Corsica. The balloons and register attained a height of 8000 meters before the balloons burst and the instruments were parachuted to the sea for recovery and reading. Readings from two temperature sensors and a pressure sensor were recorded.
North of Corsica, Mediterranean Sea 1905 4 April
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Figure 34. Anemometer and dial - an anemometer of this type was shown in the catalog of the firm of Richard Brothers in 1886.
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Figure 35. A wind direction recording instrument offered by the firm of J. Richard in 1901.
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Figure 36. A modern wind direction indicator or weathervane that would transmit wind direction to a recording device. The use and history of this instrument is impossible to determine.
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Figure 37. Assman aspirating psychrometer, used to determine relative humidity by comparing dry and humid air temperatures. The instrument was designed on principles discovered by the German Ernst Ferdinand August, the director of the Gymnasium of Berlin, in 1825. Professor Richard Assman of the Meteorological Institute of Berlin, built this instrument about 1886.
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Figure 38. Hygrometer register, built to record variations in relative humidity. The hygrometer is built on principles discovered by Horace Benedict Saussure in 1783 and uses the changes in length of human hair and animal hair with humidity to derive relative humidity. The exact age of this recording instrument is unknown.
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Figure 39. A rain gage - this model was sold by the firm of Jules Richard and appeared in his catalog in 1886.
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Figure 40. Aneroid barometer register for recording the pressure readings of an aneroid barometer. The aneroid barometer was invented by the French instrument -maker Lucien Vide in 1843. This register was constructed by the firm of Richard Brothers and described by Hippolyte Sebert in 1882 and appeared in the a notice put out by the firm in 1886.
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Figure 41. Aneroid barometer with register built by the firm of Richard Brothers. This model was meant for use on vessels. This particular instrument was used by Prince Albert I of Monaco on board the PRINCESS ALICE and PRINCESS ALICE II between 1892 and 1899.
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Figure 42. A thermometer register for recording observed temperatures. This instrument probably dates at least back to the late Nineteenth Century.
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Figure 43. Buchanan hypsometer - this instrument is meant to determine altitude by relating the temperature of the boiling point of water to altitude. As altitude increases, the boiling point decreases. The instrument shown uses a method developed by Regnault and was used by John Young Buchanan in 1899.
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Figure 44. Thermometers used for hypsometry (measurement of altitude). These instruments were graduated between 0 and 100 degrees Celsius. These thermometers were constructed by A Haak in Germany in 1902.
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Figure 45. Quartz spectrograph, meant to photographically meausure the spectrum of various materials under analysis. This instrument was constructed by the Paris firm of Jobin and Yvon in 1901. Several of these instruments were made by the engineer Amedee Jobin.
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Figure 46. Manometer register, meant to measure pressure. This device was constructed by the firm of J. Richard and meant for industrial applications such as recording the pressure in boilers, of hydraulic presses, etc. It was apparently constructed in the late 19th Century.
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Figure 47. Viscometer, used to measure the viscosity of a liquid. This instrument worked by measuring the force which opposed the rotation of a disk or a cylinder which was immersed in the liquid.
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Figure 48. Walker log, used to measure the speed of a ship under way. This instrument was towed behind a vessel and the number of turns of the rotor during a given interval was directly proportional to the speed of the vessel through the water. This instrument was apparently invented prior to 1882 and sold under the name "T. Walker's patent harpoon ship log."
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Figure 49. Dial of a Marconi radiogoniometer. This instrument was the reading device of a radio direction finder that would allow a ship or aircraft to home in on a radio signal and determine the direction to the transmitter.
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Prince Albert I of Monaco, 1848-1922, a great oceanographer, statesman, and humanitarian. He is wearing the "habit ver", the uniform of the Institut de France of which the Academie des sciences de Paris is one of five components. Through his generosity, the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco was established.
1910 circa
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The HIRONDELLE in a storm
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A beautiful poster of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco painted by Marcel Camia.
Monaco 1930 circa
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A section of a beautiful poster of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco showing the museum in its wonderful location by the sea. This image was painted by Marcel Camia.
Monaco 1930 circa
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A view of sailors at their stations operating winches during oceanographic operations.
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The physical oceanography hall of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco showing part of the collections.
1913
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An aerial view of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco showing its location by the sea.
1948 circa
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The physical oceanography hall of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco showing part of the collections.
1910
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Prince Albert I of Monaco, 1848-1922, a great oceanographer, statesman, and humanitarian. He is wearing the "habit ver", the uniform of the Institut de France of which the Academie des sciences de Paris is one of five components. Through his generosity, the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco was established.
1910 circa
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Prince Albert I of Monaco, 1848-1922, a great oceanographer, statesman, and humanitarian. He is wearing the "habit ver", the uniform of the Institut de France of which the Academie des sciences de Paris is one of five components. Through his generosity, the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco was established.
1910 circa
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The names of the ships POLA and BLAKE inscribed on the facade of the Oceanographic Museum of Monaco. The BLAKE was the Coast and Geodetic Survey Ship BLAKE which was memorialized because of its work in the Gulf Stream, the Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean. It also was one of the most innovative of Nineteenth Century research vessels.
Monaco
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Richard net fully opened. Plate III, print 2. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1905 April
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Bouree net ready to put overboard. Plate III, print 3. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1911 August
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Small extended length Bouree net. Plate III, print 4. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1911 August
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Return of large Prince Albert bow net. Plate III, print 5. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1909 August
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Modified Giesbrecht net ready to descend. Plate III, print 6. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1901
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The drag net arriving on the deck. Plate III, print 7. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1901
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The drag net arriving on the deck. Plate III, print 8. In: "Results of the Scientific Campaigns of the Prince of Monaco." Vol. 89.
1901

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April 30, 2013