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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

10700 thumbnail picture
Humpback whales are mammals that must surface to breathe. Megaptera novaeangliae
Boreal to Tropical Atlantic and Pacific
10701 thumbnail picture
Humpback whales are gentle and feed primarily on krill, small shrimp. Megaptera novaeangliae
Boreal to Tropical Atlantic and Pacific
10702 thumbnail picture
Humpback whales migrate from near the poles to tropical waters. Megaptera novaeangliae
Boreal to Tropical Atlantic and Pacific
10703 thumbnail picture
Humpback whale is attracted to an ROV, or undersea robot. Megaptera novaeangliae
Boreal to Tropical Atlantic and Pacific
10704 thumbnail picture
California sea lions bask in the sun,
Temperate Pacific Ocean, Columbia River, WA
10705 thumbnail picture
Mother and juvenile bottlenose dolphins head to the seafloor. Tursiops truncatus
Temperate-Tropical Atlantic & Pacific Ocean
10706 thumbnail picture
Sea lion rises to bark at a research vessel.
Temperate Pacific Ocean, Columbia River, WA
10707 thumbnail picture
Catalina Island off southern CA, former home of a NURP center.
Temperate Pacific Ocean, Los Angeles, CA
10708 thumbnail picture
Close up of worm tubes, sometimes the most prominent structures on sandy bottom.
10709 thumbnail picture
Small dead crab in hypoxic (no oxygen) sediments off Louisiana.
Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi River mouth
10710 thumbnail picture
Bacterial mats are common the seafloor where oxygen is low. Beggiatoa sp.
Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi River mouth
10711 thumbnail picture
Mangroves of South Florida are threatened coastal development.
South Florida.
10712 thumbnail picture
Mangroves roots serve as critical habitat for many species and nutrient filters.
South Florida.
10713 thumbnail picture
Gravel-cobble bottom off Maine coast is favored scallop ground.
10714 thumbnail picture
Penguins explore snow-dunes in Antarctica
10715 thumbnail picture
Corals throughout the Caribbean are bleaching (casting out their algae).
Florida Keys.
10716 thumbnail picture
Sponges are as important as corals for reef structure.
Florida Keys 1972 May
10717 thumbnail picture
Reef fish use the reef for cover and food.
10718 thumbnail picture
Corals on the reef vary from large stony heads to whispy branches.
10719 thumbnail picture
Tiny coral animals build massive reef structures.
10720 thumbnail picture
Staghorn corals have declined at Caribbean reefs in the past 20 years.
Florida Keys
10721 thumbnail picture
Brain corals get their name from the folds and turns in the coral skeleton.
10722 thumbnail picture
The diversity of fish and other reef organisms rival tropical rainforests.
Florida Keys 1972 May
10723 thumbnail picture
Bioerosion of coral reefs makes them brittle and susceptible to collapse.
1974 May
10724 thumbnail picture
Like corals, glass sponges are also partly composed of calcareous material.
10725 thumbnail picture
Staghorn corals form the forests of the reef.
10726 thumbnail picture
The lights of the camera bring out the brilliant colors of the reef.
10727 thumbnail picture
Sponges, corals and many other attached species compete for space on the reef.
10728 thumbnail picture
This temperate reef off North Carolina has hard corals and tropical fish.
North Carolina Coastal 1993 August
10729 thumbnail picture
Scientists study reefs for many reasons, economic and ecologic.
Virgin Islands
10730 thumbnail picture
Elkhorn, Acropora palmata, coral towers above reef creating habitat and beach protection.
10731 thumbnail picture
Demosponges and coralline algae on a permanent photo plot.
1984 August
10732 thumbnail picture
Diversity on cold rocky reefs can also be very high.
10733 thumbnail picture
Starfish and anemones in a cold water rocky community.
Massachusetts Coastal 1988 february
10734 thumbnail picture
Macroalgae are important habitat on temperate and northern reefs. Macrocystis
California, Southern Coast
10735 thumbnail picture
Kelp beds are extremely complex and critical marine habitats. Wise management of both kelp beds and the animals that depend on them is key to the future of our marine ecosystem.
10736 thumbnail picture
Flowers are actually worms with tubes among the reef growth.
10737 thumbnail picture
Macroalgae come in many shapes and sizes, from microscopic to tens of meters.
10738 thumbnail picture
Brown algae on a temperate Carolina reef can survive a wide temperature range. Lobophora
Shelf off North Carolina
10739 thumbnail picture
Diverse "live bottom" community on a Carolina reef.
Shelf off North Carolina
10740 thumbnail picture
Green, red and brown algae vary seasonally and differ in role as fish food.
Shelf off North Carolina
10741 thumbnail picture
Stromatolites are club-shaped structures formed by a slow buildup of microbial mats trapping ooid sands. These form in high energy channels where migrating sand dunes and chemical precipitation of carbonate cement are dominant seafloor processes.
Bahama Islands
10742 thumbnail picture
Stromatolites off NURP's research center on Lee Stocking Island.
Bahama Islands
10743 thumbnail picture
Sub taking samples on a deep sea basalt bed off Hawaii.
Hawaii
10744 thumbnail picture
Any kind of structure on the deep sea floor attracts local mobile species.
Hawaii 1985 July
10745 thumbnail picture
Offshore red algae communities serve as egg beds for New England herring.
Offshore Massachusetts, Pigeon Hill 1974 August
10746 thumbnail picture
Golden crab attempts to free a buddy from a crab trap. Geryon
Florida, northern 1988 July
10747 thumbnail picture
Experimental reefs, or casitas, help determine what factors make the best reefs.
Bahama Islands
10748 thumbnail picture
Hake lie near the base of a lost "ghost" lobster trap. Urophycis
Submarine Canyon off New England
10749 thumbnail picture
Once popular tire reefs may break apart and wash up on beaches.
1976 August

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014