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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

1100 thumbnail picture
Redbanded rockfish (Sebastes babcocki)
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1101 thumbnail picture
Rockfish with deep sea coral (Lophelia pertusa)
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1102 thumbnail picture
A white sea star
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1103 thumbnail picture
A small fish
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1104 thumbnail picture
The elegant soft coral sea pen, Umbellula sp.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1105 thumbnail picture
Brittle stars and whelk leaving a track across the mud of the continental slope. Mud cloud in lower right probably caused by ROV disturbing sediment
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1106 thumbnail picture
A large sea anemone more that 10 centimeters across
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1107 thumbnail picture
Whelks and clams at a methane cold seep in the Juan de Fuca Canyon
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1108 thumbnail picture
A white precipitate forms at this cold seep in Juan de Fuca Canyon. Cold seeps are ocean floor "springs" where sulfide- or methane-rich fluids are released from the seafloor.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1109 thumbnail picture
Whelk egg capsule "towers"
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1110 thumbnail picture
Rat-tailed fish
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1111 thumbnail picture
White structure with brittle stars. Blackish depression could be methane seep. White structure could be tube worm colony
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1112 thumbnail picture
Purple sea pen that often has a large brittle star (Asteronyx loveni) associated with it.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1113 thumbnail picture
"Dumbo" deep sea cirrate octopus, likely Opistoteuthis californiana. This type of octopus has muscular lateral fins to propel it.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1114 thumbnail picture
Pom Pom anemone (Liponema brevicornis)
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1115 thumbnail picture
All life is interconnected. An aggregation of brittle stars (Ophiura sarsi) with a sea urchin in upper right.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1116 thumbnail picture
All life is interconnected. An aggregation of brittle stars. In some areas the seafloor is covered in brittle stars (Ophiura sarsi).
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1117 thumbnail picture
Luidia foliolata, a predatory sea star that feeds on bivalves, sea cucumbers and brittle stars among other things, makes an imprint in the sand, like a snow angel.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1118 thumbnail picture
Marine debris human trash thrown overboard from vessel attracts variety of marine life, particularly urchins and whelks.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1119 thumbnail picture
Marine debris human trash thrown overboard attracts urchins, a sun star, whelks, and an assemblage of brittle stars.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1120 thumbnail picture
Marine debris human trash thrown overboard attracts urchins, a sun star, and whelks.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1121 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1122 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1123 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1124 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1125 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1126 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1127 thumbnail picture
Primnoa pacifica providing habitat for rockfish.
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1128 thumbnail picture
Sea anemone and brittle stars sharing space with human marine debris
Washington, Olympic Coast NMS
1129 thumbnail picture
Large cable on sea floor with marine growth colonizing. Perhaps a communications cable.
1130 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. Shaefer's anglerfish (Sladenia shaefersi) that was brought up by the Johnson-Sea-Link II submersible. This is the third specimen of this species that has ever been seen. The first was seen off the coast of Colombia in 1976. The "fishing poles" on his head are illiceum, or the first and second spines of the dorsal fin which are used to attract prey.
1131 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. A crab megalopae (late larval stage) has a pink, crab-like body. Unlike a mature crab, however, the megalopae does not hold its abdomen underneath its body.
1132 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. Of the eight rock specimens collected on this expedition, three rock types were found: (A) Mn-phosphorite pavement rock, some of which included large nodules; (B) loosely cemented foraminifera ooze; and (C) well-cemented foraminiferan limestone that formed ledges and overhangs.
1133 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. Blackfin codling prefer dark iron-stained sand mixed with patchy hard bottom and sessile invertebrate growth.
1134 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. A floating light-trap used to capture larval and juvenile stages of fishes.
1135 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. An arcturid isopod clings to a branch of an octocoral. This photo was taken using a camera mounted to a microscope. The field of view of the photo is 3 millimeters.
1136 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. Long-spine porcupinefish captured in the Sargassum community.
1137 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. Pelagic brown algae in the genus Sargassum. The berry-like structures are gas-filled bladders known as pneumatocysts, which provide buoyancy to the plant.
1138 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. A Pluto skate found (Fenestraja plutonia) on iron-stained sand bottom with manganese nodules .
1139 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. A small sea urchin brought to the surface by the Johnson Sea Link II.
1140 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. Two sponges attached to a piece of manganese phosphorite rock.
1141 thumbnail picture
Estuary to Abyss Expedition 2004. White tube sponges, showing the large central osculum and similar ostia (pores) in the body wall. A brittle star can be seen in the sponge on the left.
1142 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. A new species of commensal amphipod collected from Paramuricea coral. The brown spots may be used to mimic the coral's polyps.
1143 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. An example of the lushly diverse habitat explored during this expedition.
1144 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. Primnoid octocorals among Lophelia at approximately 2500 ft in depth.
1145 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. The deep sea coral Enallopsammia profunda.
1146 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. A specimen of Keratoisis bamboo coral inside the collection box of the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible, rising to the surface.
1147 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. A specimen of Keratoisis bamboo coral.
1148 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. This is believed to be a new species of a commensal amphipod. This 7-8 mm. long specimen was discovered inside a Hexactinallid sponge.
1149 thumbnail picture
Florida Deep Coral Expedition 2005. Two different types of gorgonian corals rising to the surface in the "bio-box" attached to the front of the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible.

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013