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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

12350 thumbnail picture
Chief Boatswain Joe Dimartino operates winch - CTD operations on MT. MITCHELL. CTD - Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurements. MT. MITCHELL CTD's used to determine ocean sound velocity structure. Sound velocity information used to correct soundings. In support of bathymetric mapping operations
Gulf of Mexico 1991
12351 thumbnail picture
Chief Boatswain Joe Dimartino instructing winch operators during CTD operations. CTD - Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurements. MT. MITCHELL CTD's used to determine ocean sound velocity structure. Sound velocity information used to correct soundings. In support of bathymetric mapping operations
Gulf of Mexico 1991
12352 thumbnail picture
Captain A. Theberge and Lt. Mike Abbott discuss ship-handling during CTD's. Chief Boatswain Joe Dimartino watches over winch operator during CTD operations . CTD - Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurements. MT. MITCHELL CTD's used to determine ocean sound velocity structure. Sound velocity information used to correct soundings during bathymetric mapping
Gulf of Mexico 1991
12353 thumbnail picture
Captain Theberge and Lt. Abbott monitoring CTD operations. CTD - Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurements. MT. MITCHELL CTD's used to determine ocean sound velocity structure. Sound velocity information used to correct soundings. In support of bathymetric mapping operations
Gulf of Mexico 1991
12354 thumbnail picture
MT. MITCHELL CTD operations - Field Operations Officer Dave Gardner on right. Night-time deployment of CTD rosette. CTD - Conductivity, Temperature, Depth measurements. MT. MITCHELL CTD's used to determine ocean sound velocity structure. In support of bathymetric mapping operations
Gulf of Mexico 1989
12355 thumbnail picture
Captain Theberge and Lt. Abbott monitoring CTD operations. Chief Boatswain Joe Dimartino observing winch operator
Gulf of Mexico 1991
12356 thumbnail picture
Satellite sensors and imagery have revolutionized oceanography. An image of the Gulf Stream
12357 thumbnail picture
Satellite sensors and imagery have revolutionized oceanography. An image of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico
12358 thumbnail picture
Sounding machine devised by Robert Hooke. Drop glass ball with weight over side. Ball disengages when weight hits bottom. Known rate of descent and ascent - can then derive depth. Never worked right.
12359 thumbnail picture
HMS RACEHORSE in pack ice - Captain Constantine Phipps. Sounded in Norwegian Sea in 683 fathoms. Brought up blue mud. First modern successful sounding on continental slope area. Not sounding in image
Norwegian Sea September 4, 1773
12360 thumbnail picture
Boats from HMS EREBUS and HMS TERROR - Captain James Clark Ross. Sounded in open ocean at 27.43 S and 17.48 W. Recorded depth of approximately 2200 fathoms. First modern successful sounding in deep ocean
South Atlantic Ocean 1840
12361 thumbnail picture
USS VINCENNES in pack ice - Captain Charles Wilkes commanding. On the Antarctic shelf, Wilkes sounded with copper wire in 400 fathoms. First use of wire instead of hemp sounding line. Copper too ductile and would break - gave up on idea
Antarctica, Wilkes Land 1840
12362 thumbnail picture
A second attempt at a bathymetric map by Matthew Fontaine Maury. Published in "The Physical Geography of the Sea" with black and grey shading. Showed vast relatively shoal area in Mid-Atlantic which gave birth to the notion of a "Telegraphic Plateau". The shoal area was actually part of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge discovered by Otway Berryman in 1853.
North Atlantic Ocean 1855
12363 thumbnail picture
Deepsea soundings by the USS ARCTIC - Otway Berryman commanding. Top line is ship track between Newfoundland and Ireland. Bottom line is profile and shows no plateau. Generated a controversy with Matthew Fontaine Maury. Maury declared erroneous and continued touting "Telegraphic Plateau"
North Atlantic Ocean 1856
12364 thumbnail picture
Sounding device made by William P. Trowbridge for Coast Survey. Line would pay out of a descending cylinder and stationery cylinder on deck. Similar to modern bathythermograph copper wire instrument. Civil War intervened stopping research. Probably would have worked
1860
12365 thumbnail picture
Thomson piano wire sounding machine as mounted on USS TUSCARORA. This machine was invented by Sir William Thomson, a.k.a. Lord Kelvin. Made use of heavy weight and piano wire - line paid out until weight hit bottom . This machine revolutionized deepsea sounding. Variations would be used for over 50 years
1873
12366 thumbnail picture
USS TUSCARORA - commanded by George Belknap. First ship to successfully use piano wire sounding machine
1873
12367 thumbnail picture
Track of USS TUSCARORA from Cape Flattery to Japan.
1873
12368 thumbnail picture
Profile with bottom characteristics of TUSCARORA soundings. Profile shows continental slope and Juan de Fuca Ridge. This was the first indication of the Juan de Fuca Ridge system
12369 thumbnail picture
Sounding record from Fish Commission Steamer ALBATROSS.
12370 thumbnail picture
Auxiliary vessels of the Coast and Geodetic Survey 1942.
12371 thumbnail picture
Ships of the Coast and Geodetic Survey 1942.
12372 thumbnail picture
The BLAKE anchored off WINDWARD Passage. George Belknap shipped Thomson piano wire machine to BLAKE in 1875 Charles Sigsbee modified Thomson machine. Sigsbee sounding machine was the standard for many years
12373 thumbnail picture
Diagram of the Sigsbee Sounding Machine as used on the BLAKE. George Belknap shipped Thomson piano wire machine to BLAKE in 1875 Charles Sigsbee modified Thomson machine to make the Sigsbee Sounding Machine . Sigsbee sounding machine was the standard for many years
1875
12374 thumbnail picture
Sigsbee Sounding Machine in use on the ALBATROSS.
1890?
12375 thumbnail picture
Contour map of Gulf of Mexico as sounded by the C&GS Steamer BLAKE between 1873 and 1875. Over 3,000 soundings went into this chart, most of the deep water soundings beween taken by the Sigsbee Sounding Machine. This was the first realistic bathymetric map of any oceanic basin. In: "Three Cruises of the BLAKE" by Alexander Agassiz, 1888. P. 102. QH 93.A26 1888 v.1.
1878
12376 thumbnail picture
Soundings from the Sigsbee Sounding Machine in the Gulf of Mexico.
12377 thumbnail picture
Contour map of the Caribbean from soundings by C&GS Steamer BLAKE and Fish Commission Steamer ALBATROSS. Both ships used Sigsbee Sounding Machine. In: "Three Cruises fo the BLAKE" by Alexander Agassiz, 1888. P. 98. Library Call Number QH 93.A26 1888 v.1.
1885
12378 thumbnail picture
3-D view of the Gulf of Mexico, Eastern U.S., and Western Atlantic. This is probably the first 3-dimensional seafloor view ever constructed. It was published in "Three Cruises of the BLAKE", by Alexander Agassiz, 1888. P. 94. Library Call Number QH 93.A26 1888 v.1.
1885?
12379 thumbnail picture
Sigsbee Sounding Machine on stern of ALBATROSS.
1900?
12380 thumbnail picture
Soledad and Los Coronados Canyons. Soledad Canyon is known today as La Jolla Canyon
San Diego, California 1897
12381 thumbnail picture
Robert Peary North Pole Expedition. Sounding with piano wire through the ice. Profile of soundings tends to corroborate that Peary made it to the North Pole.
Arctic Ocean 1909
12382 thumbnail picture
Bathymetric map of the World's oceans. Produced by Sir John Murray
1911
12383 thumbnail picture
North Atlantic Ocean showing clear delineation of Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Detail of Sir John Murray map
North Atlantic 1911
12384 thumbnail picture
Pair of piano wire sounding machines on the PATTERSON.
Unimak Island area, Aleutian Islands, Alaska 1913
12385 thumbnail picture
Steam sounding machine on the GEDNEY.
North Pacific 1913
12386 thumbnail picture
Sounding operations on the PATTERSON.
Unimak Island area, Aleutian Islands, Alaska October, 1913
12387 thumbnail picture
Sounding machine - detail view. On the PATTERSON
Unimak Island area, Aleutian Islands, Alaska October, 1913
12388 thumbnail picture
First track of sonic range finder on USS STEWART. Crossed north Atlantic with sonic sounding device. Made approximately 900 soundings from United States to Gibraltar
Atlantic Ocean 1922
12389 thumbnail picture
Temperature contours showing continuity of Mid-Atlantic Ridge. From Atlas of the METEOR Expedition. Combining sparse depth readings and temperature to infer bathymetry
South Atlantic Ocean 1927
12390 thumbnail picture
A hand sounding machine. On the EXPLORER
North Pacific Ocean 1927
12391 thumbnail picture
Installation of deepsea sounding equipment. C&GS 1931 Hydrographic Manual
1931
12392 thumbnail picture
LL type wireline sounding machine. C&GS 1942 Hydrographic Manual
12393 thumbnail picture
Early continuous sounding record from acoustic system. Off of OCEANOGRAPHER. C&GS didn't use recording instruments until late 1930's
Hudson Canyon area 1939
12394 thumbnail picture
Submarine valley discovered in Georges Bank area. Work done by OCEANOGRAPHER
Georges Bank, offshore Massachusetts 1931
12395 thumbnail picture
Submarine valleys of Georges Bank. Contoured by Dr. Francis P. Shepard, "the father of marine geology". Work done by OCEANOGRAPHER
Georges Bank, offshore Massachusetts 1932
12396 thumbnail picture
The Mendocino Escarpment. The initial indication of the great seafloor fracture zones. Surveyed by GUIDE between 1935-1938
California, Cape Mendocino area 1938
12397 thumbnail picture
First discoveries of PIONEER and GUIDE Seamounts. Seamounts discovered by PIONEER and GUIDE.
California Central Coast 1929-1932
12398 thumbnail picture
Davidson Seamount named for George Davidson of the C&GS. This feature was the first called a "seamount". Officially named by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names. Discovered by GUIDE in 1933. Error - latitude should range from 35 to 36
South of Monterey, California 1934
12399 thumbnail picture
Identified as submerged atolls on Palawan Bank. Note similarity in shape to salt structures in Gulf of Mexico. See images "theb.3833.htm" and "theb.3834.htm"
Palawan Bank, Philippine Islands 1933

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May 12, 2014