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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

14700 thumbnail picture
A covering of manganese nodules in a bathymetric low point. Are they still attached to the rock below with sediment in the intervening spaces, have they formed in situ, have they eroded off a botryoidal manganese coated substrate?
20150806T002528Z
14701 thumbnail picture
A field of manganese nodules. See expn6100.
20150806T002449Z
14702 thumbnail picture
A huge elongated toothpaste tube-like pillow lava.
20150802T234143Z
14703 thumbnail picture
A field of manganese encrusted boulders relatively devoid of life.
20150804T201756Z
14704 thumbnail picture
A field of manganese encrusted boulders relatively devoid of life. These boulders are relatively rounded. By what process were they formed and deposited on this slope?
20150804T211243Z
14705 thumbnail picture
Columnar jointing on the nose of a ridge.
20150805T223400Z
14706 thumbnail picture
Sampling a small pink corallium bush.
20150819T003719Z
14707 thumbnail picture
Attempting to sample an orange brown feather star crinoid. Photo #1.
20150810T030457Z
14708 thumbnail picture
Darn! These things can swim. Feather star crinoid momentarily escapes. Photo #2.
20150810T030606Z
14709 thumbnail picture
Apparently Deep Discoverer's robotic sampling arm is quicker than a swimming crinoid. Swimming feather star crinoid captured and being brought to sample box. Photo #3.
20150810T031324Z
14710 thumbnail picture
Deep Discoverer robotic arm sampling a cobble.
20150810T194704Z
14711 thumbnail picture
Deep Discoverer robotic arm sampling a cobble.
20150813T211928Z
14712 thumbnail picture
Giant trevally passing by the umbilical cord securing Deep Discoverer to the Serios mother ship during launching of vehicles for bottom traverse.
20150815T182618Z
14713 thumbnail picture
Hardpan carbonate surface at Keahole site.
20150829T235135Z
14714 thumbnail picture
Vuggy carbonate surface at Keahole site.
20150830T012558Z
14715 thumbnail picture
A jellynose eel, Hawaiian spikefish, and an unidentified (perhaps surgeonfish) fish
20150913T010024Z
14716 thumbnail picture
A jellynose eel cruising over a black coral bush on a sand bottom.
20150913T010044Z
14717 thumbnail picture
A chimaera
20150918T014120Z
14718 thumbnail picture
A cutthroat eel with its mouth partially open.
20150918T024314Z
14719 thumbnail picture
Partial view of red holothurian.
20150918T233050Z
14720 thumbnail picture
A small branching sponge.
20150923T000552Z
14721 thumbnail picture
First map of an oceanic basin. Matthew Fontaine Maury produced this map in 1853 and published it in the Wind and Current Charts for that year.
14722 thumbnail picture
Second map of an oceanic basin. Matthew Fontaine Maury produced this map in 1854 and published it in the Wind and Current Charts for that year. This map had significantly more data than the 1853 map including soundings by Lt. Otway Berryman, USN, on the USS DOLPHIN over the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) north of the Azores. These were the first soundings on the MAR.
14723 thumbnail picture
Bottom characteristic map of the approaches to New York Harbor by "United States Hydrographical Office" as published in Matthew Fontaine Maury's Wind and Current Charts for 1858. Data from United States Coast Survey. Note there is no expression of Hudson Canyon below the continental shelf break although the channel of the Ice Age Hudson River is clearly shown.
14724 thumbnail picture
First profile of an oceanic basin. Matthew Fontaine Maury produced this profile in 1854 and published it in the Wind and Current Charts for that year.
14725 thumbnail picture
An early example of a microscopic examination of ocean bottom sediment. This was published with a report by Lt. Joseph Dayman, RN, who ran a line of sounding s across the Atlantic Ocean from Newfoundland to Ireland on HMS CYCLOPS in 1857. This was the second line run and covered the same ground sounded by Lt. Otway Berryman for the USCS on the ARCTIC in 1856.
14726 thumbnail picture
Sounding on the HMS CYCLOPS in mid-Atlantic Ocean in August 1857. The diagram on the right shows the problem with early hemp sounding line methods. The line would keep running out after reaching bottom and the surveyors would not be able to ascertain an accurate depth.
14727 thumbnail picture
Top panel same as image map00006. Bottom panel demonstrates method of detaching weight and retrieving bottom sample such that the surveyor would at least know that the sounding weight had reached bottom. However, this did not improve the accuracy of the sounding.
14728 thumbnail picture
Western section of survey line run by Lt. Joseph Dayman on HMS CYCLOPS during telegraph cable survey of 1857. The work of Berryman and Dayman between in 1856 and 1857 respectively marked a new era in ocean exploration, the beginning of systematic surveys, in this case to determine a telegraph cable route.
14729 thumbnail picture
Middle section of survey line run by Lt. Joseph Dayman on HMS CYCLOPS during telegraph cable survey of 1857. The work of Berryman and Dayman between in 1856 and 1857 respectively marked a new era in ocean exploration, the beginning of systematic surveys, in this case to determine a telegraph cable route.
14730 thumbnail picture
Eastern section of survey line run by Lt. Joseph Dayman on HMS CYCLOPS during telegraph cable survey of 1857. The work of Berryman and Dayman between in 1856 and 1857 respectively marked a new era in ocean exploration, the beginning of systematic surveys, in this case to determine a telegraph cable route.
14731 thumbnail picture
Cover to the publication by Lt. Joseph Dayman detailing the work of running the first lines of soundings across the Atlantic Ocean as part of an intentional planned survey.
14732 thumbnail picture
In 1858, Matthew Fontaine Maury modified his 1854 map to show the Telegraphic Plateau extending east-west across the Atlantic Ocean and an area of relatively shoal ground which he called Middle Ground. The Telegraphic Plateau actually extended through much of what is known today as the Charlie Gibbs Fracture Zone with no high mountains giving the illusion of a plateau.
14733 thumbnail picture
A map of Hudson Canyon reproduced in James Dwight Dana's Manual of Geology, first edition, published in 1862. This map was provided by the United States Coast Survey to Dana. The first discovery of submarine canyons occurred on the Pacific Coast, Hueneme Canyon in 1855 and Monterey Canyon in 1857.
14734 thumbnail picture
A curious map of the Arctic Ocean showing land extending north from Greenland. Published in 1869 in Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen.
14735 thumbnail picture
Josephine Bank, the first seamount discovered as a direct result of intentional exploration. Discovered by the Swedish Corvette Josephine in 1869. Northern 9/10 of bank.
14736 thumbnail picture
Josephine Bank, the first seamount discovered as a direct result of intentional exploration. Discovered by the Swedish Corvette Josephine in 1869. Southern 1/2 of bank.
14737 thumbnail picture
Josephine Bank, the first seamount discovered as a direct result of intentional exploration. Discovered by the Swedish Corvette Josephine in 1869. Image digitally merged from images map00016 and map00017.
14738 thumbnail picture
The east coast of the United States showing the continental shelf, shelf break, continental slope, and sediment types. This was one of the first published maps of this nature. The Coast Survey had rediscovered the continental shelf break in 1848. Count Luigi Marsili had first noted it in the Gulf of Lyon about 1720 but that information had been forgotten in the mid Nineteenth Century.
14739 thumbnail picture
"The Sea Bottom off Florida and Cuba" as published by Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen in 1870. This map was drawn by Louis Francois de Pourtales of the the United States Coast Survey. Pourtales Plateau was named by Louis Agassiz, the first undersea feature off the continental shelf in U.S. waters that was discovered as the result of oceanographic exploration.
14740 thumbnail picture
"The Sea Bottom off Long Island" as published by Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen in 1870. This map was drawn by Louis Francois de Pourtales of the the United States Coast Survey. Map shows head of Hudson Canyon, the canyon axis as shown by the Mud Holes as it crosses the continental shelf, and the sediment types.
14741 thumbnail picture
Full page presentation of the two maps shown in image map00019 and map00020. as published by Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen in 1870 by Louis Francois de Pourtales of the United States Coast Survey.
14742 thumbnail picture
Map of the North Atlantic Ocean published on the eve of the CHALLENGER Expedition in "The ocean, atmosphere, and life...." by the French geographer Elisee Reclus. This map shows some very large non-existent shoals to the east of Newfoundland as well a deep extending to the NE which seems imaginative. The profile is based on the work of Dayman and Berryman in 1856/1857.
14743 thumbnail picture
Map of the Atlantic Ocean published after the outward bound segment of the CHALLENGER Expedition. This map shows little improvement over earlier versions. The Mid-Atlantic Ridge is shown bending to the west south of the Azores and there is no expression of the ridge in the South Atlantic Ocean.
14744 thumbnail picture
Map of the area southeast of New Guinea showing various reefs and islands in a sparsely surveyed area. In: Petermann's Geographische Mittheilungen for 1874.
14745 thumbnail picture
Map of the Congo Canyon, one of the great canyons on the west coast of Africa. The source is noted as "Medlycott and Flood", 1875. Medlycott is mentioned by as having been associated with HMS LYNX in 1859 on the west coast of Africa, so this would place the discovery of Congo Canyon sometime between 1859 and 1875.
14746 thumbnail picture
The "Contour Map of the Atlantic" should be known as one of the classical maps of the Earth Sciences. This version of the map was published by Sir Wyville Thomson of the CHALLENGER Expedition in 1877 and is the first ever to show the continuity of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The N-S line in the south Atlantic followed the ridge and is among the most important survey lines ever run.
14747 thumbnail picture
This map, by Augustus Petermann, was the first bathymetric map of the Pacific Ocean. Data was acquired by the CHALLENGER, the USS TUSCARORA, and the German research ship GAZELLE. Note the much denser sounding information on the TUSCARORA as the result of first use of piano-wire sounding. Note the Tuscarora Deep, first discovery of a trench, today called the Japan-Kuril Trench.
Pacific Ocean North 1877
14748 thumbnail picture
Soundings taken by the first USS ENTERPRISE exploration vessel under the command of Captain Albert S. Barker. This was the first U.S. ship to specifically circumnavigate the globe on a sounding and temperature measuring expedition. Note the shoal area at approximately 29 N 34 W. This was originally called the Barker Rise but is now called the Rio Grande Rise.
Atlantic Ocean South 1883-1886
14749 thumbnail picture
Track of the USS ENTERPRISE across the Indian Ocean. Note the 3097 fathom sounding southwest of Sumatra. That sounding is the first indication of the Java Trench. A few years later, Sir John Murray named that area the Enterprise Deep, a name which has been superceded by Java Trench.
Indian Ocean 1883

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