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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

1850 thumbnail picture
The cloudy gases collected from the boiling vent can be seen in the top third of the sample tube. Analyzing the gases will enable scientists to determine the origin of the hydrothermal fluids.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 18
1851 thumbnail picture
Among the cracks of the pillow lavas and above them were numerous fish - bluenose, roughy, and alfonsino. The fish were, no doubt, once the target of the snagged fishing lines observed at the summit of Rumble V.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 May 6
1852 thumbnail picture
Large schools of mau mau fish call the summit of Giggenbach volcano home.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 18
1853 thumbnail picture
A fish called an armourhead stargazer rests on the seafloor of Rumble V volcano. This sighting, at 770 meters, was surprisingly deep for this species.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 22
1854 thumbnail picture
A brilliant orange coffinfish appears to scowl at PISCES V submersible as the sub invades its territory. This fish commonly rests on the bottom, using its fins like legs.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 15
1855 thumbnail picture
An anemone on relatively young lava flows at Volcano W.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 22
1856 thumbnail picture
An angler fish lies in wait on young lava flows from Volcano W. This species was previously unknown to inhabit New Zealand waters.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 22
1857 thumbnail picture
A deepsea shark called a prickly dogfish swims by PISCES V at Rumble V volcano.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 22
1858 thumbnail picture
The pink and green algae covering the rocks at the summit are able to grow because sunlight can reach these shallow depths.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005
1859 thumbnail picture
This huge grouper, over 1 meter in length, was a constant companion of PISCES V as it traversed the summit of Giggenbach volcano.
New Zealand, Kermadec Arc 2005 April 18
1860 thumbnail picture
Bamboo whip coral and a deep sea ophidioid fish at 1245 meters depth on the Bahama Escarpment.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1861 thumbnail picture
Large branching bamboo corals .
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1862 thumbnail picture
A whip-like colony of a bamboo coral extends more than 2 meters from the face of a ledge at 1700 meters depth.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1863 thumbnail picture
An anglerfish swims up from its typical resting place on the bottom at approximately 1400 meters depth in Exuma Sound.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1864 thumbnail picture
A red paragorgia coral being overgrown by a yellow zoanthid ( a colonial anemone) vand sponges on a wall at 1560 meters depth on the Bahama Escarpment.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1865 thumbnail picture
Several brittle stars have their arms wrapped around the branches of an octocorallian (Plexauridae) sea fan at 1120 meters depth in Exuma Sound.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1866 thumbnail picture
A spiraling bamboo coral grows upward off a vertical wall at 1500 meters depth; pink brittle stars can be seen on the colony and a large white sponge grows behind it.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1867 thumbnail picture
Large branching bamboo corals flank a delicate chrysogorgiid coral, Metallogorgia melanotrichos.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1868 thumbnail picture
A red galatheid crab perches on a black coral at 1470 meters depth on the Bahama Escarpment. A large white sponge is in the right center of the image.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1869 thumbnail picture
Two tripod fish sit facing the current at 1960 meters depth in the Northeast Providence Channel near Eleuthera Island.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1870 thumbnail picture
A sea spider creeps along the top of a ridge at 1960 meters depth in the Northeast Providence Channel near Eleuthera Island.
Bahama Islands 2009 March
1871 thumbnail picture
As ALVIN Launch Coordinator for the dive, pilot Gavin Eppard pays close attention as the sub is gently lowered into the Gulf of Mexico.
2006 May 21
1872 thumbnail picture
Final safety checks are carefully run through before the ALVIN submersible descends to the seafloor. The research vessel ATLANTIS II and the ALVIN crew often spend 8 months per year at sea.
2006 May 21
1873 thumbnail picture
The ALVIN submersible begins its descent to the bottom. Photo #1.
2006 May 21
1874 thumbnail picture
The ALVIN submersible begins its descent to the bottom. Photo #2.
2006 May 21
1875 thumbnail picture
The ALVIN submersible begins its descent to the bottom. Photo #3.
2006 May 21
1876 thumbnail picture
The ALVIN submersible begins its descent to the bottom. Photo #4.
2006 May 21
1877 thumbnail picture
The ALVIN submersible begins its descent to the bottom. Photo #5.
2006 May 21
1878 thumbnail picture
Bacterial mats, mussels, and tubeworms are common at cold seeps. This image from Atwater Valley site 340 in the Gulf of Mexico was captured with a downward-looking camera mounted on the ALVIN.
2006 May 21
1879 thumbnail picture
This photomosaic is a careful compilation of multiple images taken of a mussel bed with the downward looking camera on the ALVIN. This is only a small part of the entire mussel mosaic.
2006 May 21
1880 thumbnail picture
A small orange crab near a few scattered tube worm individuals at 2180 meters depth in Atwater Valley.
2006 May 21
1881 thumbnail picture
A large galatheid crab clings to coral stalks.
2006 May 21
1882 thumbnail picture
Small naturally-occuring oil droplets that have seeped through the sediment.
2006 May 8
1883 thumbnail picture
Just after starting the ascent to the surface, ALVIN captured this image of a coral garden with galatheid crab and large anemones.
2006 May 21
1884 thumbnail picture
The front of the ALVIN submersible up against a rocky outcrop with tubeworms and mussels scattered along the base. On the front of the submersible, in the "basket", are two mussel pots with a series of twelve sediment cores in between.
2006 May 9
1885 thumbnail picture
Encounters of the third kind. A brave octopus fights off an alien intruder. This stunning octopod, Benthoctopus sp., seemed quite interested in ALVIN's port manipulator arm. Those inside the sub were surprised by the octopod's inquisitive behavior.
2006 May 31
1886 thumbnail picture
Scientists discovered several communities of football-sized mussels, Bathymodius brooksi, at Mississippi Canyon 853 during ALVIN dive 4178. This is the biggest B. brooksi specimen ever collected. Upon close inspection, you may be able to see stains from the oil that is sometimes found in the sediment around seeps.
1887 thumbnail picture
Sailor's delight - watching the mesmerizing motion of dolphins playing in the bow wave of the ATLANTIS II.
1888 thumbnail picture
Not a moment is wasted on modern oceanographic ships. Beam trawl being conducted at night off the WHOI research vessel ATLANTIS II.
1889 thumbnail picture
Sea snail observed by ROV. Possibly a Midas slit shell.
South Carolina, Blake Plateau area 2004 August 24
1890 thumbnail picture
Sea snail observed by ROV. Possibly a Midas slit shell.
South Carolina, Blake Plateau area 2004 August 24
1891 thumbnail picture
This was the largest colony of white bamboo coral (Keratoisis flexibilis) observed on the expedition. It measured approximately 4 feet wide and 3 feet tall.
Florida Straits 2005 November 9
1892 thumbnail picture
The cup sponge Hyalonema sp. The cup sponge is a type of glass sponge with a stalk of long glass spicules supporting the "goblet" head. Glass sponges are some of the oldest colonial animals (metazoans) on Earth, arising after bacteria and single-celled organisms.
Florida Straits 2005 November 9
1893 thumbnail picture
An orange Lophelia discovered during this expedition.
Florida Straits 2005 November 20
1894 thumbnail picture
Closeup view of the white bamboo coral (Keratoisis flexibilis) showing the coral 's extended feeding polyps. This coral and other filter feeders orient so that they are perpendicular to the current, positioning themselves to be in the flow of food carried in the current.
Florida Straits 2005 November 9
1895 thumbnail picture
The lovely slit shell, Perotrochus amabilis, inhabits a rubble strewn area between 850 and 700 feet depth along the Tennessee Bioherm 1, a mound that extends from the sea bottom at a depth of 1,000 feet to within 550 feet of the surface.
Florida Straits 2005 November 19
1896 thumbnail picture
At 66 meters depth on McGrail Bank, this field of red algal coralline nodules is covered with the red platelike alga Peyssonnelia inamoena and representatives of of the brown algal genus Dictyota.
Gulf of Mexico 2003
1897 thumbnail picture
A single colony of bright-white Lophelia pertusa coral. Lophelia requires hard substrate for attachment and growth and this large boulder provided the necessary substrate. A variety of anemones share this habitat.
Gulf of Mexico 2003 September 23
1898 thumbnail picture
Most algae need a hard substrate upon which to anchor with their holdfast. In silty mud bottoms they must compete for space on available shell debris with other organisms , as shown here by the red alga Graciliara blodgettii at 100 meters depth on McGrail Bank.
Gulf of Mexico 2003
1899 thumbnail picture
Some areas of Bright Bank are blanketed by dense mats of the spongy green alga Codium repens as shown here at 60 meters depth.
Gulf of Mexico 2003

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014