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Voyage To Inner Space - Exploring the Seas With NOAA Collect
Catalog of Images

400 thumbnail picture
View of the US Coast Guard Cutter Healy from the ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
401 thumbnail picture
US Coast Guard Cutter HEALY operates with a compliment of two Coast Guard HH-65B Dolphin Helicopters in addition to Healy's normal equipment and crew. All personnel and scientific equipment for the 2005 Hidden Ocean cruise are brought aboard exclusively by helicopter.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
402 thumbnail picture
Healy's Bow breaks through Arctic ice!
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
403 thumbnail picture
Hymenodora glacialis, the only pelagic shrimp known to inhabit the Canada Basin.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
404 thumbnail picture
A divers view of the underside of the ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
405 thumbnail picture
A divers view of the underside of the ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
406 thumbnail picture
Ice Divers Katrin Iken and Elisabeth Calvert descend below the ice through a hole in a melt pond while Shawn Harper teds the safety line.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
407 thumbnail picture
Jeremy Potter tends the safety line for divers beneath the ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
408 thumbnail picture
The science team descends onto the ice below in a manlift.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
409 thumbnail picture
Scientists work on the ice in foggy weather. The "manlift" in the foreground , raised and lowered by one of Healy's cranes, is their transport to and from the Healy.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
410 thumbnail picture
One of Healy's cranes lowers a scientist and equipment onto the ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
411 thumbnail picture
The comb jelly Mertensia ovum is fishing for food under Arctic ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
412 thumbnail picture
Mike Nicholson (left) and Joe Caba (right) move the ROV into position for deployment.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
413 thumbnail picture
The multinet, a device which captures small creatures in the water at different depths of the water column, is deployed off the back of the Healy.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
414 thumbnail picture
Nathan Buck works on preparing his Automated Trace Element samplers to collect water at different depths for trace metal testing.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
415 thumbnail picture
An undescribed deep-water species of Larvacean.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
416 thumbnail picture
A young mother and her cub look curiously towards the Healy.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
417 thumbnail picture
The photoplatform is deployed into icy waters.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
418 thumbnail picture
View of Arctic ice through one of Healy's portholes.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
419 thumbnail picture
The ROV begins its descent into the deep waters of the Canada Basin.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
420 thumbnail picture
The ROV is brought back on board after a dive deep into the Canada Basin.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
421 thumbnail picture
In many species of copepods, males are rare and short-lived. This male of Scaphocalanus acrocephalus is readily distinguished from the female by his antennae and tail.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
422 thumbnail picture
A sea star brought up from a benthic ROV dive.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
423 thumbnail picture
Ice Diver Shawn Harper shoots video of creatures living underneath the ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
424 thumbnail picture
Sue Moore uses a hydrophone to listen for whales and other marine mammals.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
425 thumbnail picture
Rolf Gradinger works on an ice core while Mette Nielson takes measurements on a core already brought to the surface.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
426 thumbnail picture
Katrin Iken uses a transect to measure the density of amphipods and other creatures living on sea-ice.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
427 thumbnail picture
Scientists work on ice over the deep Arctic Ocean.
Alaska, Beaufort Sea, North of Point Barrow
428 thumbnail picture
In order to maximize the amount of information collected during the research cruise, scientists participating in the Life on the Edge 2004 mission used a variety of nets and traps in addition to the JSL submersible.
North Carolina Continental Slope
429 thumbnail picture
Patches of sargassum floating at the surface are often home to a large diversity of marine animals. Andrea Quattrini, a technician with Steve W. Ross at UNC-Wilmington, passes time between submersible dives by collecting sargassum for later analysis.
North Carolina Continental Slope
430 thumbnail picture
Martha Nizinski, a scientist from the NMFS Systematics Laboratory, closely examines a piece of Lophelia. She hopes to learn more about the types of marine organisms that live in and around the deep-sea corals.
North Carolina Continental Slope
431 thumbnail picture
Beryx decadactylus (alfonsino) hovering around a large Lophelia coral. Many fishes use the deep coral habitat in a similar way as fishes in shallow coral systems, and this is a major focus of our research.
North Carolina Continental Slope
432 thumbnail picture
The 4-person Johnson Sea-Link (JSL) submersible is equipped with a variety of tools that scientists use to collect samples from the ocean depths.
North Carolina Continental Slope
433 thumbnail picture
The Johnson Sea-Link (JSL) submersible is typically launched two times per day from the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institution's R/V Seward Johnson.
North Carolina Continental Slope
434 thumbnail picture
Deep-sea corals form important habitats for unique and diverse array of marine life. Live bushes of the deep-sea coral, Lophelia, may act like island oases in the deep sea.
North Carolina Continental Slope
435 thumbnail picture
This small chunk of Lophelia coral lives in almost utter darkness hundreds of feet below the sea surface. Lophelia has been found to grow in massive "thickets" is some areas off the coast of North Carolina.
North Carolina Continental Slope
436 thumbnail picture
The Life on the Edge 2004 mission has collected a diverse array of invertebrate life around deep-sea corals. Squat lobsters are just one of the many types of organisms that use deep-sea corals for shelter.
North Carolina Continental Slope
437 thumbnail picture
Galatheid crab (possibly a Eumunida species), showing the extremely long claws they possess that enable them to cling to the inside of the suction sampler so tenaciously.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 21
438 thumbnail picture
Close-up of photoreceptors of crab collected from 1800 feet. The enormous size of these eyes suggests that they are adapted for extremely high sensitivity to light.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 21
439 thumbnail picture
Another species of galatheid (squat lobster) showing distinct eyeglow, which results when light hits the reflecting tapetum behind the retina.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 21
440 thumbnail picture
Unidentified sargassum shrimp bearing two colors of fluorescent patches.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 22
441 thumbnail picture
Fluorescent chain cat shark at about 1820' feet deep. This shark was no more than a meter long and "posed" for a couple of minutes lying still on the bottom near the submersible.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 22
442 thumbnail picture
The exuberant science crew watching video footage of the chain cat shark.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 22
443 thumbnail picture
Zooanthid polyps under fluorescent light setting (this is the blue image) and under white light.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 22
444 thumbnail picture
Zooanthid polyps under fluorescent light setting under blue light.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 22
445 thumbnail picture
Dr. Mikhail Matz checking his yellow submersible light filters prior to launch.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 22
446 thumbnail picture
Dr. Justin Marshall with slime extruded from the pores of the hagfish.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 23
447 thumbnail picture
The six-gill shark, approximately 8 feet long.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 23
448 thumbnail picture
Shark attracted by the fish pieces attached to the tip of the EITS frame and in its bait cage.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 23
449 thumbnail picture
Six-gill shark swimming in for an inspection of the Eye-in-the-Sea.
Gulf of Mexico 2005 August 23

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013