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NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Collection
Catalog of Images

1000 thumbnail picture
Early testing of hydrogen filled balloons for radiosonde measurements Theodolite used to track balloon to limit of visibility
1001 thumbnail picture
Early balloon and radiosonde launch "Radiometeorograph" or radiosonde as it became known, below launcher's hand
1002 thumbnail picture
Early launch of radiosonde developed by U.S. Bureau of Standards Launch preparations at Washington Airport blimp hangar
Washington, D.C. May 7, 1936
1003 thumbnail picture
Kite and balloon stations in the United States
Ca. 1925
1004 thumbnail picture
Diagram of kite field at Ellendale Aerological Station
Ca. 1910
1005 thumbnail picture
Diagram of kite field at Ellendale Aerological Station
Ca. 1910
1006 thumbnail picture
Kites were flown and secured by means of thin steel piano-wire
Ca. 1910
1007 thumbnail picture
The kite houses were mounted on turntables This allowed turning with wind to facilitate kite launching
Ca. 1910
1008 thumbnail picture
Note meteorograph for upper air measurements mounted on kite
Ca. 1920
1009 thumbnail picture
Getting ready to launch a Weather Bureau kite
1010 thumbnail picture
Different size kites for different altitudes
1011 thumbnail picture
Launching a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1012 thumbnail picture
Launching a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1013 thumbnail picture
Launching a pilot balloon during strong winds at St. Louis Airport Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
1945
1014 thumbnail picture
Tracking pilot balloon with theodolite Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1015 thumbnail picture
Inflating a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1016 thumbnail picture
Launching and preparing to track a pilot balloon from a Coast Guard vessel
Ca. 1950
1017 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1018 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a manned balloon The Weather Service provided information for National Balloon races
Ca. 1920
1019 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a balloon on an oceanographic ship
1020 thumbnail picture
High altitude balloon on its way
1021 thumbnail picture
Balloon for radiosonde
1022 thumbnail picture
Launching a balloon in Antarctica
1023 thumbnail picture
Preparing a balloon for launch
1024 thumbnail picture
Balloon on its way up
1025 thumbnail picture
Beginning of a pilot-balloon run at Fort Omaha, Nebraska. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 205.
Nebraska, Fort Omaha 1919 Circa
1026 thumbnail picture
Making a reading at the end of the first minute of a pilot-balloon run. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 205.
Louisiana, Gerstner Field 1919 Circa
1027 thumbnail picture
Kite reel in use at Weather Bureau Aerological Stations. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 206.
1919 Circa
1028 thumbnail picture
Front view of Marvin kite meteorograph in use at Weather Bureau Aerological Stations. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 206.
1919 Circa
1029 thumbnail picture
Kite and balloon theodolite in use at Weather Bureau, Military and Naval Aerological Stations. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 206.
1919 Circa
1030 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch America's first "ballon-sonde." Since this first launch, literally millions of weather balloons have been launched by the National Weather Service and its predecessor organization. In: "The Principles of Aerography" by Alexander McAdie, 1917. Page 12.
Missouri, St. Louis 1904 September 15
1031 thumbnail picture
Launching a "ballon-sonde", probably at St. Louis. The French were the first to use small balloons filled with hydrogen to carry meteorological instruments aloft. In: "The Principles of Aerography" by Alexander McAdie, 1917. Page 13.
Missouri, St. Louis 1905 Circa
1032 thumbnail picture
Filling the balloon of a "ballon-sonde" prior to launch. The French were the first to use small balloons filled with hydrogen to carry meteorological instruments aloft. In: "The Principles of Aerography" by Alexander McAdie, 1917. Page 14.
Missouri, St. Louis 1905 Circa
1033 thumbnail picture
Revolving kite and balloon shed at Mount Weather Observatory. In: "Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture. 1906." 1907, p. 122.
Virginia, Mount Weather 1906
1034 thumbnail picture
The Siegsfeld kite balloon at Mount Weather Observatory. In: "Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture. 1906." 1907, p. 122.
Virginia, Mount Weather 1906
1035 thumbnail picture
Hargrave-Martin box kites as used at Mount Weather Observatory. In: "Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture. 1906." 1907, p. 122.
Virginia, Mount Weather 1906
1036 thumbnail picture
Alfred Lorenz with a theodolite for tracking weather balloons.
Nebraska, North Platte 1930 December
1037 thumbnail picture
Kite being prepared for launching with kite-reel house in the background. Image obtained from an old glass lantern slide.
1910 Circa
1038 thumbnail picture
Launching a weather balloon radiosonde
Kansas, Topeka 1988 May 26
1039 thumbnail picture
HMT Mitchell Erickson inflates a weather balloon.
South Dakota, Rapid City 2004 April 7
1040 thumbnail picture
HMT Mitchell Erickson launches a weather balloon.
South Dakota, Rapid City 2004 April 7
1041 thumbnail picture
Meteorologist demonstrating a weather balloon at the Sturgis Preparedness Fair.
South Dakota, Sturgis 2006 June 16
1042 thumbnail picture
NWS WFO DTX employees David Shuler, Birdie Nash, and David Koehler (left to right) turn their eyes to the sky, to watch a radiosonde balloon ascend into the atmosphere. The crowd of people, attending the NOAA In The Great Lakes open house event, watch the balloon rise as well.
Michigan, near White Lake 2006 September 30
1043 thumbnail picture
Navy bi-plane with meteorograph on starboard wing strut Taking meteorological measurements for pressure, temperature, and humidity Manned flights were inefficient for routine observations as cost high Manned flights grounded during poor weather, thus radiosonde balloons replaced However, such flights paved the way for aircraft weather research projects
Washington, D.C. December 13, 1934
1044 thumbnail picture
Microwave antenna deployed from back end of C-130 aircraft Measuring surface wind speeds and wave height - First deep-ocean wave measurement in a hurricane - 40 foot waves measured Testing in Pacific Hurricane Ava, a vigorous130-knot storm This was the first penetration of a Pacific hurricane by a NOAA aircraft
Mexico, 300 miles SW of Acapulco June 6, 1973
1045 thumbnail picture
Cargo door of C-130 open while Robert Berles adjusts down-pointing laser Laser measuring wave height directly below NOAA C-130 aircraft Measurements taken during a winter storm experiment in North Atlantic
Winter 1975
1046 thumbnail picture
Weather Bureau DC-6 personnel during Project Storm Fury Storm Fury was a hurricane cloud seeding experiment
Florida, Miami 1966
1047 thumbnail picture
Attaching a meteorograph to the strut of a bi-plane
Ca. 1930
1048 thumbnail picture
Friez type aerometeorograph, the instrument carried on Weather Bureau observatio n aircraft. It automatically recorded temperature, relative humidity, and pressure. Here it has its protective cover and is mounted between the wings of a bi-plane. In: "Monthly Weather Review," April 1935, p. 126.
1049 thumbnail picture
Friez type aerometeorograph, the instrument carried on Weather Bureau observatio n aircraft. It automatically recorded temperature, relative humidity, and pressure. In: "Monthly Weather Review," April 1935, p. 126.

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013