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NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Collection
Catalog of Images

1450 thumbnail picture
While the Sun can look like the slightly spotted ball that Galileo saw, in soft x-rays it looks far more dynamic. Here can be seen coronal holes (dark) and mass ejections (light) concentrated at the middle latitudes.
1451 thumbnail picture
Telescope and Technician. Watching the Sun is both a metaphor for what SEC does and a reality. The telescope in the Boulder Observatory is only one of many imaging systems that are used in solar monitoring done in the Operations center.
1452 thumbnail picture
This Air Force personnel is a forecaster at the Space Weather Operations, and provides analysis of the space environment, synthesis of the many information types, and forecasts the space weather for the next 24-hours.
1453 thumbnail picture
A solar technician on the phone. The Solar Technicians who staff the Forecast Center are responsible for keeping a watchful eye on the many data channels coming into the center, and for alerting customers of impending storms.
1454 thumbnail picture
The Aurora from the Shuttle - Lucky viewers of the aurora sometimes wonder what they look like from above, not just from below. Here is what the astronauts see out of the Shuttle bay.
1455 thumbnail picture
From the moment a Shuttle lifts off, SEC is on constant alert to inform NASA of any expected solar radiation that could harm the astronauts. Should it be necessary, astronauts are kept inside the Shuttle and in the most shielded part if necessary to avoid that radiation.
1456 thumbnail picture
Melted Transformer. If geomagnetic storms seem not very noticeable, they certainly get the attention of the power industry. Here a $10 M transformer was overloaded and melted with induced currents caused by solar activity.
1457 thumbnail picture
The Space Environment. This is a map of the space environment, although greatly foreshortened. The 93 million miles between Sun and Earth is sacrificed to show ejections from the Sun, which hit the sweeping "Magnetopause" at the front edge of the Magnetosphere. The Earth, half in shadow, is surrounded by the Van Allen Radiation Belts (orange) and the magnetosphere. The Milky Way stars are visible.
1458 thumbnail picture
A signature image for SEC, taken from the Boulder Observatory telescope of an enterprising SEC staffer and the Sun setting behind the Flatirons mountains in Boulder. The Sun has a nice amount of activity, visible with the H-alpha filter.
1459 thumbnail picture
Forecast Center. Operated round the clock, the number of staff in the center varies with the activity. A big storm will see many of SEC staff in the center, keeping apprised of the conditions and answering the many calls received.
1460 thumbnail picture
Blow up of sun image on title page of "De thermis Andreae Baccii Elpidiani, civis Romani ...." by Andrea Bacci, published posthumously in 1622. Library Call Number QC253 .B32 1622.
1461 thumbnail picture
Geographical distribution of auroras in the northern hemisphere. Figure 76 in: "A Treatise on Meteorology" by Elias Loomis, 1880. P. 187. Library Call Number QC861 .L66 1880.
1462 thumbnail picture
Weather kites were used to bring recording instruments to high levels Temperature, pressure, humidity and winds were observed from kites
Virginia, Fort Whipple (Fort Myers), Arlington 1894?
1463 thumbnail picture
Exploring the upper air with a weather box kite Kite released at Drexel Aerological Station Continuously read temperature, wind velocity, pressure, altitude, and time In: "The Boy with the U.S. Weather Men", 1917, p. 172.
Nebraska, Drexel 1915?
1464 thumbnail picture
A kite equipped for meteorological observations Figure 18 of "Meteorology" by Willis Milham, 1912 Time, pressure, temperature, and humidity were recorded Recording instrument was a Marvin Meteorograph
1465 thumbnail picture
Kite operations at an aerological station
1900?
1466 thumbnail picture
A balloon equipped for meteorological observations Figure 17 of "Meteorology" by Willis Milham, 1912 A German balloon ascent in the late 1800's
1467 thumbnail picture
Army Air Force meteorologists prepare to launch hydrogen-filled balloon Balloon transported radiosonde that transmitted back to station Radiosonde measured temperature, humidity, and pressure This instrument was used up until just before the end of WWII Iceland post important for shipping and forecasting for European operations
Iceland, Meeks Field 1944?
1468 thumbnail picture
Early testing of hydrogen filled balloons for radiosonde measurements Theodolite used to track balloon to limit of visibility
1469 thumbnail picture
Early balloon and radiosonde launch "Radiometeorograph" or radiosonde as it became known, below launcher's hand
1470 thumbnail picture
Early launch of radiosonde developed by U.S. Bureau of Standards Launch preparations at Washington Airport blimp hangar
Washington, D.C. May 7, 1936
1471 thumbnail picture
Kite and balloon stations in the United States
Ca. 1925
1472 thumbnail picture
Diagram of kite field at Ellendale Aerological Station
Ca. 1910
1473 thumbnail picture
Diagram of kite field at Ellendale Aerological Station
Ca. 1910
1474 thumbnail picture
Kites were flown and secured by means of thin steel piano-wire
Ca. 1910
1475 thumbnail picture
The kite houses were mounted on turntables This allowed turning with wind to facilitate kite launching
Ca. 1910
1476 thumbnail picture
Note meteorograph for upper air measurements mounted on kite
Ca. 1920
1477 thumbnail picture
Getting ready to launch a Weather Bureau kite
1478 thumbnail picture
Different size kites for different altitudes
1479 thumbnail picture
Launching a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1480 thumbnail picture
Launching a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1481 thumbnail picture
Launching a pilot balloon during strong winds at St. Louis Airport Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
1945
1482 thumbnail picture
Tracking pilot balloon with theodolite Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1483 thumbnail picture
Inflating a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1484 thumbnail picture
Launching and preparing to track a pilot balloon from a Coast Guard vessel
Ca. 1950
1485 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a pilot balloon Women's first opportunities in meteorology occurred as a result of WWII
Ca. 1944
1486 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a manned balloon The Weather Service provided information for National Balloon races
Ca. 1920
1487 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a balloon on an oceanographic ship
1488 thumbnail picture
High altitude balloon on its way
1489 thumbnail picture
Balloon for radiosonde
1490 thumbnail picture
Launching a balloon in Antarctica
1491 thumbnail picture
Preparing a balloon for launch
1492 thumbnail picture
Balloon on its way up
1493 thumbnail picture
Beginning of a pilot-balloon run at Fort Omaha, Nebraska. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 205.
Nebraska, Fort Omaha 1919 Circa
1494 thumbnail picture
Making a reading at the end of the first minute of a pilot-balloon run. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 205.
Louisiana, Gerstner Field 1919 Circa
1495 thumbnail picture
Kite reel in use at Weather Bureau Aerological Stations. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 206.
1919 Circa
1496 thumbnail picture
Front view of Marvin kite meteorograph in use at Weather Bureau Aerological Stations. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 206.
1919 Circa
1497 thumbnail picture
Kite and balloon theodolite in use at Weather Bureau, Military and Naval Aerological Stations. In: Monthly Weather Review, April 1919, p. 206.
1919 Circa
1498 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch America's first "ballon-sonde." Since this first launch, literally millions of weather balloons have been launched by the National Weather Service and its predecessor organization. In: "The Principles of Aerography" by Alexander McAdie, 1917. Page 12.
Missouri, St. Louis 1904 September 15
1499 thumbnail picture
Launching a "ballon-sonde", probably at St. Louis. The French were the first to use small balloons filled with hydrogen to carry meteorological instruments aloft. In: "The Principles of Aerography" by Alexander McAdie, 1917. Page 13.
Missouri, St. Louis 1905 Circa

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Last Updated:
June 10, 2016