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NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Collection
Catalog of Images

1500 thumbnail picture
Filling the balloon of a "ballon-sonde" prior to launch. The French were the first to use small balloons filled with hydrogen to carry meteorological instruments aloft. In: "The Principles of Aerography" by Alexander McAdie, 1917. Page 14.
Missouri, St. Louis 1905 Circa
1501 thumbnail picture
Revolving kite and balloon shed at Mount Weather Observatory. In: "Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture. 1906." 1907, p. 122.
Virginia, Mount Weather 1906
1502 thumbnail picture
The Siegsfeld kite balloon at Mount Weather Observatory. In: "Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture. 1906." 1907, p. 122.
Virginia, Mount Weather 1906
1503 thumbnail picture
Hargrave-Martin box kites as used at Mount Weather Observatory. In: "Yearbook of the United States Department of Agriculture. 1906." 1907, p. 122.
Virginia, Mount Weather 1906
1504 thumbnail picture
Alfred Lorenz with a theodolite for tracking weather balloons.
Nebraska, North Platte 1930 December
1505 thumbnail picture
Kite being prepared for launching with kite-reel house in the background. Image obtained from an old glass lantern slide.
1910 Circa
1506 thumbnail picture
Launching a weather balloon radiosonde
Kansas, Topeka 1988 May 26
1507 thumbnail picture
HMT Mitchell Erickson inflates a weather balloon.
South Dakota, Rapid City 2004 April 7
1508 thumbnail picture
HMT Mitchell Erickson launches a weather balloon.
South Dakota, Rapid City 2004 April 7
1509 thumbnail picture
Meteorologist demonstrating a weather balloon at the Sturgis Preparedness Fair.
South Dakota, Sturgis 2006 June 16
1510 thumbnail picture
NWS WFO DTX employees David Shuler, Birdie Nash, and David Koehler (left to right) turn their eyes to the sky, to watch a radiosonde balloon ascend into the atmosphere. The crowd of people, attending the NOAA In The Great Lakes open house event, watch the balloon rise as well.
Michigan, near White Lake 2006 September 30
1511 thumbnail picture
Navy bi-plane with meteorograph on starboard wing strut Taking meteorological measurements for pressure, temperature, and humidity Manned flights were inefficient for routine observations as cost high Manned flights grounded during poor weather, thus radiosonde balloons replaced However, such flights paved the way for aircraft weather research projects
Washington, D.C. December 13, 1934
1512 thumbnail picture
Microwave antenna deployed from back end of C-130 aircraft Measuring surface wind speeds and wave height - First deep-ocean wave measurement in a hurricane - 40 foot waves measured Testing in Pacific Hurricane Ava, a vigorous130-knot storm This was the first penetration of a Pacific hurricane by a NOAA aircraft
Mexico, 300 miles SW of Acapulco June 6, 1973
1513 thumbnail picture
Cargo door of C-130 open while Robert Berles adjusts down-pointing laser Laser measuring wave height directly below NOAA C-130 aircraft Measurements taken during a winter storm experiment in North Atlantic
Winter 1975
1514 thumbnail picture
Weather Bureau DC-6 personnel during Project Storm Fury Storm Fury was a hurricane cloud seeding experiment
Florida, Miami 1966
1515 thumbnail picture
Attaching a meteorograph to the strut of a bi-plane
Ca. 1930
1516 thumbnail picture
Friez type aerometeorograph, the instrument carried on Weather Bureau observatio n aircraft. It automatically recorded temperature, relative humidity, and pressure. Here it has its protective cover and is mounted between the wings of a bi-plane. In: "Monthly Weather Review," April 1935, p. 126.
1517 thumbnail picture
Friez type aerometeorograph, the instrument carried on Weather Bureau observatio n aircraft. It automatically recorded temperature, relative humidity, and pressure. In: "Monthly Weather Review," April 1935, p. 126.
1518 thumbnail picture
Three black widow P-61 night fighters silhouetted against a thunderhead prior to separating and penetrating the thunderstorm at three different levels for meteorological readings. These planes were an intrinsic part of "The Thundersto rm Project," the classic first large-scale experiment to study atmospheric phenomena. In: "Weatherwise," Vol. 1, No. 3, June 1948, cover.
1947 Circa
1519 thumbnail picture
In general agreement that this was an inappropriate place to launch a meteorological rocket.
Circa 1968
1520 thumbnail picture
Weighing a rocket prior to launch assuring the right amount of fuel on board.
Circa 1968
1521 thumbnail picture
Securing the nose cone of an Atlantic Research Corporation meteorological rocket prior to launch.
Circa 1968
1522 thumbnail picture
Preparing an ARCAS meteorological rocket for launch.
Circa 1968
1523 thumbnail picture
Preparing a meteorological rocket for launch.
Circa 1968
1524 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a rocket for upper air observations.
Circa 1968
1525 thumbnail picture
Launching a rocket for upper air observations.
Circa 1968
1526 thumbnail picture
Launching a rocket for upper air observations.
Circa 1968
1527 thumbnail picture
"Launching a Weather Bureau Kite from the "SENECA" during the International Ice Patrol, to Explore the Air over the Ocean." In: "Meteorology" by Charles F. Talman, 1922. P. 289. Library Call Number M T151m.
1528 thumbnail picture
Exploring the upper air. Left: Beginning of a pilot balloon flight. Right: Sending up a sounding balloon. Note the parachute which wafts the basket of instruments gently to the ground after the balloon bursts. In: "Meteorology" by Charles F. Talman, 1922. Library Call Number M T151m.
Circa 1920
1529 thumbnail picture
Top: "Meteorograph for use with sounding balloon." Bottom: "Kite Meteorograph." In: "Meteorology" by Charles F. Talman, 1922. P. 33.
1530 thumbnail picture
"A snow surveyor at work. Note the cylindrical snow sampler, with its serrated cutting edge, and spring balance for weighing the sample of snow." In: "Meteorology" by Charles F. Talman, 1922. P. 289. Library Call Number M T151m.
1531 thumbnail picture
"Gaging the thirst of the air." The observer is measuring the depth of water in the evaporation pan with a graduated glass tube (burette.) In: "The Realm of the Air" by Charles F. Talman, 1931. Library Call Number M/0030 T151r.
1925 circa
1532 thumbnail picture
"Measuring rainfall." Showing the standard eight-inch rain gauge used by the Weather Bureau. In: "The Realm of the Air" by Charles F. Talman, 1931. Library Call Number M/0030 T151r.
1533 thumbnail picture
Instrument shelter as shown on old fashioned glass lantern slide.
1915 Circa
1534 thumbnail picture
Instrument shelter as shown on old fashioned glass lantern slide.
1535 thumbnail picture
Building an instrument shelter - possibly for use with cooperative observing network. From an old-fashioned glass lantern slide.
1536 thumbnail picture
Building an instrument shelter - possibly for use with cooperative observing network. From an old-fashioned glass lantern slide.
1537 thumbnail picture
Antennas, probably at Greenbury Point, Maryland, in about 1920. These were U. S. Navy communications antennas meant to communicate with Europe during the First World War and probably also with ships. Perhaps this slide was meant to illustrate the potential of wireless radio communication for weather dissemination. From an old-fashioned glass lantern slide.
Maryland, Greenbury Point, 1920 circa
1538 thumbnail picture
Preparing to launch a meteorological kite. Note attached meteorograph on kite.
1910 ca.
1539 thumbnail picture
Kite operations at Dodge City Weather Bureau kite station. The person on the right is Clarence W. Canfield, the kite-reeler. The other two individuals from left to right are probably George Todd and W. S. Beldere (sp.?).
Kansas, Dodge City 1898, June 16
1540 thumbnail picture
A strong supercell thunderstorm drops hail, with the WSR-88D Doppler radar at New Underwood, SD in the foreground.
South Dakota, New Underwood 2004 May 26
1541 thumbnail picture
The driveway to the WSR-88D at NWS WFO DTX is usually barren and lonely, but not on the day of the NOAA In The Great Lakes open house. Instead, the hilltop trail was turned into a parking lot for the over-500 guests that were hosted.
Michigan, near White Lake 2006 September 30
1542 thumbnail picture
Ray Gonzalez, RS Information Systems Lead Technician working on the Open Radar Data Acquisition (ORDA) upgrade at Western Arkansas NWS radar site.
Arkansas, Western weather radar site 2006 January 9
1543 thumbnail picture
NWS Radar Tower & Radome with rainbow in the distance.
Hawaii, Kauai 2006 February 9
1544 thumbnail picture
NWS Radar Tower and Radome
Utah, Salt Lake City 2006 June 12
1545 thumbnail picture
SCR-658 radio direction finder used to track radiosonde balloons Termed "bedsprings" antenna
1945-1946?
1546 thumbnail picture
SCR-658 radio direction finder used to track radiosonde balloons Woman observer indicates WWII or just after war time frame World War II expanded the opportunities for women in the Weather Bureau
1945-1946
1547 thumbnail picture
The track of Hurricane Donna as tracked by radar - Photo #1 of sequence Not the first hurricane seen on radar, this was the best tracked at time
1548 thumbnail picture
The track of Hurricane Donna as tracked by radar - Photo #2 of sequence Not the first hurricane seen on radar, this was the best tracked at time
1549 thumbnail picture
The track of Hurricane Donna as tracked by radar - Photo #3 of sequence Not the first hurricane seen on radar, this was the best tracked at time

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Last Updated:
June 10, 2016