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NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Collection
Catalog of Images

250 thumbnail picture
Bronze sunset reflecting in the Straits of Georgia
251 thumbnail picture
Sun pillar projected onto altocumulus
View WSW from Flat Top Mountain, North Carolina February 10, 1979
252 thumbnail picture
A diffused rainbow due primarily to variable drop sizes
View to NE from Flat Top Mountain, North Carolina September 1977
253 thumbnail picture
A magnificent halo
Looking North from the South Pole December 21, 1980
254 thumbnail picture
A magnificent halo South Pole Station is visible in the background
Looking North from the South Pole December 21, 1980
255 thumbnail picture
Sunrise on a cold winter day
Looking ESE from Burke, Virginia 6:30 A.M., December 1982
256 thumbnail picture
Rime ice in the Smokies
Town Mountain Road, near Asheville, North Carolina December, 1975
257 thumbnail picture
Snow and rime ice covering the Smokies
Flat Top Mountain, North Carolina February, 1979
258 thumbnail picture
"Trombe sur terre", tornado over land In: "Histoire des Meteores", J. Rambosson, 1869. Figure 48, p. 209
1869
259 thumbnail picture
Trombes or whirlwinds ... "scattering terror and desolation in their paths..." In: The Atmosphere translated by James Glaisher, 1873 From the work of Camille Flammarion Figure 63, p. 347
1873
260 thumbnail picture
"... gigantic whirlwinds of sand which rise from the earth to the clouds... In: The Atmosphere translated by James Glaisher, 1873. From the work of Camille Flammarion. Figure 64, p. 348.
1873
261 thumbnail picture
Two views of the same tornado at Goddard, Kansas May 26, 1903 Figure 135 of "Meteorology" by Willis Milham, 1912
1903 May 26
262 thumbnail picture
Tornado at Oklahoma City, May 12, 1896. Damage at Rochester, Minn Aug. 21, 1883. Damage at St. Louis, May 27, 1896 Figure 136-138 of "Meteorology" by Willis Milham, 1912
1896 May 12
263 thumbnail picture
Tornado cloud as seen over the buildings of an American city In: "The New Air World", Willis Luther Moore, 1922. Figure 17, p. 144
264 thumbnail picture
One of the oldest known photographs of a tornado. It is probable this image has been "doctored" from the original. At this time, the oldest known photograph of a tornado was taken on April 26, 1884 at Garnett, Kansas. See: Weatherwise for March-April 2010 for discussion.
South Dakota, 22 miles southwest of Howard 1884 August 28
265 thumbnail picture
Tornado approaching Canadian city
Vulcan, Alberta, Canada 1927 July 8
266 thumbnail picture
Tornado approaching Canadian city
Vulcan, Alberta, Canada 1927 July 8
267 thumbnail picture
Tornado in the Tennessee Valley
Near Paris, Tennessee 1942 March 11
268 thumbnail picture
A funnel cloud
269 thumbnail picture
Tornado tearing up a farm field
270 thumbnail picture
Tornado at Enid, Oklahoma
1966 June 5
271 thumbnail picture
Tornado in farm country
272 thumbnail picture
Tornado at Manhattan, Kansas
1949 May 31
273 thumbnail picture
A Texas twister in Wichita County
Near Wichita Falls, Texas 1964
274 thumbnail picture
A massive tornado
275 thumbnail picture
Twin funnels on Palm Sunday
Indiana, Elkhart 1965 April 11
276 thumbnail picture
A funnel within a funnel
Near Jasper, Minnesota 1927 July 8
277 thumbnail picture
A swirling mass of clouds associated with tornado to left
278 thumbnail picture
A huge tornado near Stapleton International Airport
Colorado, Denver 1975 May 18
279 thumbnail picture
The awesome force of a tornado - tree pierced by shovel Tornado of May 27, 1896, at St. Louis, Missouri In: "The New Air World", Willis Luther Moore, 1922 Figure 19, p. 146
280 thumbnail picture
Airplanes thrown about like toys by tornado Tornado of March 20, 1948 at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma
281 thumbnail picture
Military air transport command airplane destroyed by tornado Tornado of March 20, 1948 at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma
282 thumbnail picture
Remains of a large military aircraft after passage of tornado Tornado of March 25, 1948 at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma The coming of this storm resulted in the first broadcast tornado warning
283 thumbnail picture
Airplanes spun about and left in random directions by tornado Tornado of March 25, 1948 at Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma coming of this storm resulted in the first broadcast tornado warning
284 thumbnail picture
The awesome power of a tornado demonstrated A 33rpm plastic record blown into a telephone pole
285 thumbnail picture
Tornado damage at Omaha. 154 killed and over 3000 left homeless As seen in: "Our National Calamity of Fire, Flood, and Tornado" by Logan Marshall, 1913. L. T. Myers publisher.
Omaha, Nebraska 1913 March 23
286 thumbnail picture
Tornado damage at Omaha. 154 killed and over 3000 left homeless As seen in: "Our National Calamity of Fire, Flood, and Tornado" by Logan Marshall, 1913. L. T. Myers publisher.
Omaha, Nebraska 1913 March 23
287 thumbnail picture
Tornado damage at Terre Haute. As seen in: "Our National Calamity of Fire, Flood, and Tornado" by Logan Marshall, 1913. L. T. Myers publisher.
Terre Haute, Indiana 1913 March 23
288 thumbnail picture
Tornado damage at Terre Haute. As seen in: "Our National Calamity of Fire, Flood, and Tornado" by Logan Marshall, 1913. L. T. Myers publisher.
Terre Haute, Indiana 1913 March 23
289 thumbnail picture
A tornado victim at Omaha found in a tree. It is possible that this was a posed shot as the victim is relatively clean and there are no apparent tears in his clothes. As seen in: "Our National Calamity of Fire, Flood, and Tornado" by Logan Marshall, 1913. L. T. Myers publisher.
Omaha, Nebraska 1913 March 23
290 thumbnail picture
Tornado destruction in Omaha. Searching for victims in the vicinity of Idlewild Hall. As seen in: "Our National Calamity of Fire, Flood, and Tornado" by Logan Marshall, 1913. L. T. Myers publisher.
Omaha, Nebraska 1913 March 23
291 thumbnail picture
Bizarre hailstones that were oblong disks approximately 1/3 as thick as long. Accompanied a severe storm. Monthly Weather Review, November, 1962, p. 477.
St. Paul, Minnesota 1962 June 23
292 thumbnail picture
Ruins of the Longfellow School where 17 children were killed. The storm hit the school at about 2:30 p.m. A casualty of the Tri-State Tornado, the longest- lived and longest path of any recorded tornado. It travelled 300 miles from SE Missouri to Indiana and killed over 600. In: Journal of the Western Society of Engineers, Vol. 30, No. 9. September, 1925.
Murphysboro, Illinois 1925 March 18
293 thumbnail picture
Ruins of the Longfellow School where 17 children were killed. The storm hit the school at about 2:30 p.m. A casualty of the Tri-State Tornado, the longest- lived and longest path of any recorded tornado. It travelled 300 miles from SE Missouri to Indiana and killed over 600. In: Effects of Tornadoes on Factory Buildings, Associated Factory Mutual Fire Insurance Companies, 1925.
Murphysboro, Illinois 1925 March 18
294 thumbnail picture
Ruins of the Baptist Church at Murphysboro, Illinois. A funeral was in progress when the tornado hit around 2:30 p.m. A casualty of the Tri-State Tornado , the longest-lived and longest path of any recorded tornado. It traveled over 300 miles from SE Missouri to Indiana and killed over 600. In: Journal of the Western Society of Engineers, Vol. 30, No. 9. September, 1925.
Murphysboro, Illinois 1925 March 18
295 thumbnail picture
Map showing weather situation and storm track of Tri-State Tornado. Black line is tornado track. The Tri-State Tornado was the longest-lived and had the longest path of any recorded tornado. It traveled over 300 miles from SE Missouri to Indiana and killed over 600. In: "Monthly Weather Review," April 1925, p. 141.
Missouri, Illinois, Indiana 1925 March 18
296 thumbnail picture
Ruins of the De Soto, Illinois, public school where 33 children were killed. The storm hit the school at about 2:45 p.m. A casualty of the Tri-State Tornado , the longest-lived and longest path of any recorded tornado. It traveled over 300 miles from SE Missouri to Indiana and killed over 600. In: Journal of the Western Society of Engineers, Vol. 30, No. 9. September, 1925.
Illinois, De Soto 1925 March 18
297 thumbnail picture
Engineering committee examining a 1X5 inch board which was driven through a 2X6 plank. Somewhere along the path of the Tri-State Tornado, the longest-lived and longest path of any recorded tornado. It traveled over 300 miles from SE Missouri to Indiana and killed over 600. In: Journal of the Western Society of Engineers, Vol. 30, No. 9. September, 1925.
Southern Illinois 1925 March 18
298 thumbnail picture
One of many tornadoes in the vicinity of Gothenburg, Nebraska. In: "Monthly Weather Review," June 1931, p. 228.
Near Gothenburg, Nebraska 1930 June 24
299 thumbnail picture
The crack passenger train, "Empire Builder," bound from Seattle to Chicago, was struck by a tornado. The train was traveling nearly 60 miles an hour when struck. Only the 136-ton locomotive remained on the track.
Minnesota, East of Moorhead 1931 May 27

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014