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NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Collection
Catalog of Images

3700 thumbnail picture
Radar weather observations. Pre-frontal nimbostratus and rain are shown. Volume 3, No. 2 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 5.
New Jersey, Spring Lake 1944
3701 thumbnail picture
Sequence of thunderstorm motion and activity. Volume 3, No. 2 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 6-7.
New Jersey, Spring Lake 1944
3702 thumbnail picture
Cover of Volume 3, No. 3 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin. Colonel D. N. Yates receiving the Legion of Merit from Lt. General Carl Spaatz for "his part in deciding the choice of D-Day in Europe... he picked the only day in June on which the great operation could have been launched." Colonel Yates became head of the AAF Weather Wing and the AF Air Weather Service.
1945 March
3703 thumbnail picture
Cover of Volume 3, No. 5 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin. Meteorologist adjusting anenometer cups on weather station.
1945 May
3704 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 5 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, back cover. Pie chart of expenditure of time in a typical weather station.
1945 May
3705 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 5 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 10. Waterspouts in the Adriatic Sea.
Adriatic Sea 1944 November 11
3706 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 5 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 11. A huge waterspout in the Adriatic Sea.
Adriatic Sea 1944 November 11
3707 thumbnail picture
Cover of Volume 3, No. 6 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin. An Army Air Forces Weather Wing meteorologist adjusts a recording device.
1945 June
3708 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 6 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, back cover. Diagram of the extent of the Army Air Forces Weather Service. 18,000 men, 885 weather installations, 50 stations, and operating in over 50 countries at close of WW II.
1945 June
3709 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 6 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, back cover. Tactical uses of weather by air and ground forces during WWII.
1945 June
3710 thumbnail picture
Cover of Volume 3, No. 7 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin. City Hall of Asheville, North Carolina. Apparently used as the headquarters of Army Air Forces Weather Wing from 1943 through at least August of 1945. The Weather Wing changed its name to AAF Weather Service just prior to publication of this issue.
1945 July-August
3711 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 7 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, pp. 12-13. Mobile field radar SCR-584 unit on left. Tower-mounted weather radar unit AN-APQ-13 on right.
1945 July-August
3712 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 7 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 12. Mobile field radar unit SCR-584.
1945 July-August
3713 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 7 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 13. Tower-mounted weather radar unit AN-APQ-13 with accompanying electronics package.
1945 July-August
3714 thumbnail picture
Cover of Volume 3, No.8 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin. Preparing the daily weather map.
1945 September-October
3715 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No. 8 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, back cover. Joe Dope gets in trouble for not going through channels to get the appropriate forms. Cartoon.
1945 September-October
3716 thumbnail picture
Cover of Volume 3, No.9 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin. Several weather facscimile machine networks were in operation by the end of World War II. The first system was tested in 1942 between Washington, D.C., and Presque Isle, Maine.
1945 November-December
3717 thumbnail picture
Volume 3, No.9 of the Army Air Forces Weather Service Bulletin, p. 31. A communications truck of the 21st Weather Squadron after encountering two German paramines. Seven Purple Heart medals were awarded as a result of this tragedy. The weatherman also shared in the dangers of the Front.
3718 thumbnail picture
Three-dimensional model weather map device designed at Tinker Air Force Base. This device allowed forecasters at Tinker AFB to improve forecasts by allowing the visualization of weather patterns in 3-D over a fairly large area. Such a device was first devised in 1935 by I. I. Zellon, a United States Bureau meteorologist at Pittsburgh, PA. Weather Service Bull. 6, 02/25/1949. P. 13.
1949
3719 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 8, 1949. AN/CPS-9 storm detection radar console. This console houses four cathode-ray tube indicators and a range counter: a plan-position indicator, an R-scope, and B-scope, a range-height indicator, and a counter to read accurate range.
3720 thumbnail picture
Radar range display of AN/CPS-9 storm detection radar system. This had a much greater range than earlier weather radars. Weather Service Bulletin No. 8, 1949. P. 10
3721 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 8, 1949. P. 11. Final page of article on AN/CPS-9 storm detection radar.
3722 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 8, 1949. P. 21. Cloud base and top radar indicator developed allowing cloud heights to be determined directly above the observer.
3723 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 8, 1949. P. 22. Cloud base and top radar indicator developed allowing cloud heights to be determined directly above the observer. Shows time series of thunderstorm with cloud tops at approximately 45,000 feet.
1948, July 23
3724 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 8, 1949. P. 22. Cloud base and top radar indicator developed allowing cloud heights to be determined directly above the observer.
3725 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 9, 1949. P. 11. Wiresonde set AN/UMQ-4 components. This system was attached by wire to a retrievable balloon or kite which was reeled in or out to a height of approximately 1,000 feet.
3726 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 1, 1950. Cover. Illustrating an important Air Weather Service activity, this RB-29 of the 373rd Reconnaissance Squadron is shown coming in for a landing at Kindley AFB after completing a "routine" hurricane mission.
Bermuda, Kindley Air Force Base 1949
3727 thumbnail picture
Propeller of an RB-29 Air Weather Service Reconnaissance aircraft flying in the eye of Typhoon Gloria as it made landfall on Okinawa. Captain Roy E. Ladd commanded the aircraft. Weather Service Bulletin No. 1, 1950. P. 50.
Japan, Okinawa 1949, July 23
3728 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 1, 1950. P. 50. Circulation in eye of Typhoon Gloria. This was one of the earliest pictures capturing the circular nature of tropical storm circulation. Taken by T/Sgt Robert Aston, 514th Reconnaissance Squadron with K-20 camera from 10,500 feet.
1949, July 24
3729 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 1, 1950. P. 54. A rare photo showing the Chiefs of the three major weather services together at the Thirtieth Anniversary meeting of the American Meteorological Society. L to R - Francis Reichelderfer of the USWB, Captain H. T. Orville of the Naval Weather Service, and General D. N. Yates of the Air Weather Service.
1950 January
3730 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. Cover. V-2 rocket being prepared for White Sands Proving Ground. Besides weapons related research, a number of these rockets were used for meteorological research and early Earth photography from high altitude.
New Mexico, White Sands 1950 ca.
3731 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. P. 6. V-2 rocket being launched at White Sands Proving Ground. Besides weapons related research, a number of these rockets were used for meteorological research and early Earth photography from high altitude.
New Mexico, White Sands 1950 ca.
3732 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. P. 49 Seasonal changes in the polar ice pack. This article includes the concept that the polar ice cap was diminishing, that ice cover varies from year to year and place to place, and also included a number of photographs radar scope images showing ice at different Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950.
Arctic Ocean
3733 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. P. 50. Top photograph of Arctic ice from 17,000 feet taken in mid-April showing total ice coverage in area. Spider-web appearing lines actually ice ridges, sometimes up to 10 feet high. At 86 North. Bottom: Ice conditions at 73N, 128W. Photo from 17,000 feet in July. The dark spots on ice are melt pools.
Arctic Ocean
3734 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. P. 51. The North Pole in July as seen from 18,000 feet.
Arctic Ocean
3735 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. P. 52. Right - The North Pole in July as seen on an aircraft radarscope at 18,000 feet. Numerous openings in pack ice. Mid-September photograph from 18,000 feet at 76 N, 124W showing refreezing ice. Old floes are encased in a matrix of new ice. Melt pools have refrozen and are covered with a layer of snow.
Arctic Ocean
3736 thumbnail picture
Weather Service Bulletin No. 2, 1950. P. 53. Two radarscope views showing variability of sea ice conditions including numerous open leads even in December .
Arctic Ocean
3737 thumbnail picture
Moon beams playing on the water.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay 2007 June 1
3738 thumbnail picture
Sun glint astern of the NOAA Ship THOMAS JEFFERSON. Cumulus clouds and a moderate breeze kicking up wind waves.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay 2007 May 23
3739 thumbnail picture
Glorious crepuscular rays terminating on the ocean surface.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay 2007 May 23
3740 thumbnail picture
Sun shining on Cape Fear River through openings in the clouds.
North Carolina, Wilmington area 2007 November
3741 thumbnail picture
Sunset over Long Island Sound
New York, Long Island Sound 2007 July 1
3742 thumbnail picture
Sunset over Long Island Sound
New York, Long Island Sound 2007 July 1
3743 thumbnail picture
Sunset over Long Island Sound
New York, Long Island Sound 2007 July 1
3744 thumbnail picture
Fog on Chesapeake Bay
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay Entrance 2007 May 11
3745 thumbnail picture
The view from the porthole - fog on Chesapeake Bay.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay Entrance 2007 May 11
3746 thumbnail picture
No launch work today. Nasty weather on Chesapeake Bay shuts down hydrographic survey operations at least for this day.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay Entrance 2007 April 7
3747 thumbnail picture
Blowing hard in Chesapeake Bay. Winds at 40 knots sustained, gusting to over 50 knots.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay Entrance 2007 April 6
3748 thumbnail picture
Blowing hard in Chesapeake Bay. Winds at 40 knots sustained, gusting to over 50 knots.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay Entrance 2007 April 6
3749 thumbnail picture
Blowing hard in Chesapeake Bay. Winds at 40 knots sustained, gusting to over 50 knots as shown on the anenometer readout.
Virginia, Chesapeake Bay Entrance 2007 April 6

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June 10, 2016