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NOAA's Restoration Center Collection
Catalog of Images

500 thumbnail picture
The pre-restored channel at the Glade Bekken restoration site.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
501 thumbnail picture
An image of the culvert that was removed and replaced. This old culvert blocked upstream migration of coho and chum salmon.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
502 thumbnail picture
An image of the culvert that was removed and replaced.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
503 thumbnail picture
The old roadfill at the Glad Bekken restoration site. the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling and flattening surfaces.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
504 thumbnail picture
The first in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
505 thumbnail picture
The second in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats. This image shows the spyder crawling.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
506 thumbnail picture
The third in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
507 thumbnail picture
The fourth in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
508 thumbnail picture
The fifth in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
509 thumbnail picture
The sixth in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
510 thumbnail picture
The seventh in a series of images that show the specialized "spyder" at work at the Glade Bekken restoration site. The spyder was used at the restoration site to prevent and minimize disturbance to the habitat. The machine crawls and walks over the surface as opposed to rolling over and flattening sensitive habitats.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
511 thumbnail picture
Gentle draft horses were used to transport wood to the sensitive regions of the upper river where heavy machinery would have been inappropriate. The horses were less expensive and worked in conjunction with the spyder to minimize disturbance to the stream bed and riparian buffer areas.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
512 thumbnail picture
Draft horses bring woody debris to add complexity to the stream to improve spawning habitat at the Glade Bekken restoration site.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
513 thumbnail picture
A driver prepares the draft horses to haul a load of woody debris to the upper stream bed.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
514 thumbnail picture
The draft horses used to haul woody debris at the restoration site were gentle and beautiful as well as less costly than heavy machinery.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
515 thumbnail picture
A single draft horse pulls wood to the restoration site at the Glade Bekken watershed.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
516 thumbnail picture
Two men drive their horses into the stream to drop wood off at the restoration staging site.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
517 thumbnail picture
Cabling weir log
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
518 thumbnail picture
excavation of the stream bed at the Glade Bekken restoration site.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
519 thumbnail picture
Men and draft horses place woody debris in the stream.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
520 thumbnail picture
The new pipes that were used to replace the old culvert that inhibited coho and chum salmon from migrating to their spawning grounds.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
521 thumbnail picture
The spyder brings logs to the staging area at the Glade Bekken restoration site.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
522 thumbnail picture
The staging area at the Glade Bekken restoration site.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
523 thumbnail picture
Spill control at the pipe.
Stillaguamish watershed, Washington November 1999
524 thumbnail picture
A woman volunteer cuts air potato from a tree during a restoration project at Indian River Lagoon to remove Brazilian Peppers from native mangrove habitat.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
525 thumbnail picture
Volunteers from a local high school cut Brazilian Pepper bushes at their bases and then spray a spot application of herbicide. Brazilian Pepper is an introduced species that outcompetes the native mangroves.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
526 thumbnail picture
Volunteers remove Brazilian Pepper bushes from native mangrove habitat.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
527 thumbnail picture
A local school group poses after the removal effort. Volunteers cut Brazilian Pepper bushes from native mangrove habitat and then the County Roadworks uses a chipper to chip the bushes and dispose of the brush.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
528 thumbnail picture
Volunteers at Indian River Lagoon. The lagoon is in the background and the image shows how the mangrove canopy is being choked out by Brazilian Pepper.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
529 thumbnail picture
A volunteer removes Brazilian Pepper growth from mangrove habitat along the Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
530 thumbnail picture
Indian River Lagoon is in the background of this image. The lagoon is one of the largest lagoons on the east coast of Florida and is prime habitat for Snook and Tarpon. The lagoon waters are estuarine. This image shows Brazilian Pepper stumps to the right of the volunteer's feet. Once the pepper bushes have been cut an herbicide will be applied to kill the bush.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
531 thumbnail picture
A rest area set up with snacks for the volunteers.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
532 thumbnail picture
Student volunteers cut Brazilian Pepper growth from native mangrove habitat along Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
533 thumbnail picture
Student volunteers cut Brazilian Pepper growth from native mangrove habitat along Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
534 thumbnail picture
Student volunteers cut Brazilian Pepper growth from native mangrove habitat along Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
535 thumbnail picture
The Indian River Lagoon provides prime estuarine habitat for native mangrove species.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
536 thumbnail picture
Mangroves unimpeded by Brazilian Pepper bushes.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
537 thumbnail picture
Brazilian Pepper bushes are an ornamental from Brazil that looks like Holly. They produce red berries that birds eat. The birds carry their seeds spreading the plant throughout mangrove habitat where the Pepper bush outcompetes the mangroves. The red berries are beautiful but toxic; direct contact with them causes a poison ivy-like rash.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
538 thumbnail picture
This area has been cleared of Brazilian Pepper to help the mangroves recolonize at the waterline.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
539 thumbnail picture
This image shows the big stumps of the Brazilian Peppers that have been cut to make way for mangroves. Brazilian Pepper bushes can reach twenty feet in height. During the restoration, bushes as big as 9" in diameter were cleared to provide habitat for mangroves to recolonize. Without restoration efforts to clear Brazilian Pepper, the bush could take over mangrove habitat in two years time.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
540 thumbnail picture
A school teacher shows her students mangrove propagules. The students collected propagules and replanted them at the water's edge after the Brazilian Peppers had been removed.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
541 thumbnail picture
The shoreline at Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
542 thumbnail picture
Volunteers collect mangrove propagules to replant after clearing Brazilian Peppers from mangrove habitats.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
543 thumbnail picture
Volunteers plant mangrove propagules at the shoreline of Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
544 thumbnail picture
Planting mangrove propagules at Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
545 thumbnail picture
Planting mangrove propagules at Indian River Lagoon.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
546 thumbnail picture
Volunteers haul away Brazilian Pepper brush. This part of the restoration is extremely labor intensive. The brush must be cut by hand, chipped and then burned. The pepper brush must be burned before the berries turn red or the seeds will be distributed and begin new growth.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
547 thumbnail picture
Volunteers cut Brazilian Pepper.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
548 thumbnail picture
Volunteers cut Brazilian Pepper.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996
549 thumbnail picture
A group of volunteers haul away Brazilian Pepper refuse before burning.
Florida, Broward County, Indian River Lagoon October 1996

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013