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NOAA's Restoration Center Collection
Catalog of Images

1050 thumbnail picture
Collecting samples
Poplar Island, Talbot County, Maryland 1995-1996
1051 thumbnail picture
Checking fyke nets
Poplar Island, Talbot County, Maryland 1995-1996
1052 thumbnail picture
Sampling in the marsh
Poplar Island, Talbot County, Maryland 1995-1996
1053 thumbnail picture
fyke nets in the marsh at the sundown
Poplar Island, Talbot County, Maryland 1995-1996
1054 thumbnail picture
Dave Meyer and Chris Doley checking samples
Poplar Island, Talbot County, Maryland 1995-1996
1055 thumbnail picture
Description not available.
1056 thumbnail picture
PVC pipes are used to protect the Oculina varicosa and to provide stability during the restoration.
1057 thumbnail picture
Oculina varicosa rubble destroyed by commercial fishing gear.
1058 thumbnail picture
Oculina varicosa restoration structure comprised of cement blocks and PVC piping.
1059 thumbnail picture
Description not available.
1060 thumbnail picture
Grouper spawning aggregation in healthy Oculina varicosa habitat.
1061 thumbnail picture
Description not available.
1062 thumbnail picture
Description not available.
1063 thumbnail picture
Description not available.
1064 thumbnail picture
Oculina varicosa rubble destroyed by commercial fishing gear.
1065 thumbnail picture
Map showing location of oculina reserve.
1066 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes and Becky Allee of NOAA prepare to begin work at the Tampa Bay monofilament clean-up.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1067 thumbnail picture
A National Marine Fisheries Service enforcement officer volunteer at the clean-up.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1068 thumbnail picture
A boater observes progress at the clean-up sites.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1069 thumbnail picture
A Brown Pelican, one of the species commonly entangled in discarded fishing line, rests at the entrance to Maximo Park. Volunteers and NOAA and Tampa Baywatch staff departed from Maximo Park to begin the clean-up activities around Tampa Bay.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1070 thumbnail picture
The Reefmaker, a vessel, and volunteers engaged in the clean-up.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1071 thumbnail picture
A single Brown Pelican rests on the water in Tampa Bay. Brown Pelicans are one of the species that benefit from the monofilament clean-up that is organized yearly by Tampa Baywatch. Brown Pelicans and other birds fall victim to discarded monofilament fishing line when they roost on estuary islands.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1072 thumbnail picture
A volunteer radios for his next location.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1073 thumbnail picture
A Great Egret, Casmerodius albus, preens in a tree on an island in Tampa Bay. Great Egrets are another species of bird that become entangled in discarded fishing line in their roosting habitat.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1074 thumbnail picture
Three Brown Pelicans rest at the entrance to Maximo Park.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1075 thumbnail picture
Tampa Baywatch and McDill Airforce Base pontoon boats assist in the clean-up and rescue of entangled birds.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1076 thumbnail picture
Observers watch the progress
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1077 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes of NOAA passes an injured pelican onto a waiting boat that will take the bird to a rehabilitation center.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1078 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes of NOAA cradles a pelican that was injured when it became entangled in monofilament in its roosting area.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1079 thumbnail picture
A heron sits on the dock alongside the water. Numerous species of herons live and roost in the waters that surround Tampa Bay.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1080 thumbnail picture
A Great Egret, Casmerodius albus, roosts in a tree.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1081 thumbnail picture
Volunteers at the clean up site relax after their work.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1082 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes and Becky Allee of NOAA participate in the all day clean-up.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1083 thumbnail picture
One of the many boats that helped to transfer NOAA volunteers from the staging area to the clean-up sites.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1084 thumbnail picture
A brown pelican preens in the water.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1085 thumbnail picture
The shoreline around Tampa Bay.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1086 thumbnail picture
NOAA volunteers prepare to travel to the clean-up sites.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1087 thumbnail picture
A view of Tampa Bay and the causeway.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1088 thumbnail picture
The surrounding shoreline and homes on Tampa Bay.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1089 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes buries a dead pelican that was removed from the mangroves where it was entangled in discarded monofilament.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1090 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes prepares to bury a dead pelican. Pelicans are one of the bird species that become entangled in discarded monofilament fishing line. The birds are trapped by the line when it wraps around their legs and can not fly to hunt for food or reach water. Death is prolonged and painful. The monofilament clean up removes line from the roosting sites to protect birds from entanglement.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1091 thumbnail picture
Peter Clark of Tampa Baywatch, left, addresses volunteers at the staging area before the workers depart to begin the clean-up.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1092 thumbnail picture
A dead brown pelican floats in the water as testimony to the destructiveness of discarded monofilament in marine environments.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1093 thumbnail picture
Volunteers hunt for discarded monofilament in the roots and branches of mangroves. A dead victim, a brown pelican floats in the water nearby.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1094 thumbnail picture
Volunteers rush to bring an injured bird to the boat that will transport the pelican to wildlife rehabilitators who will attempt to resuscitate the bird. Successful rehabilitation depends upon a number of factors including the length of entanglement and exposure to the elements.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1095 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes uses a long handled boat hook to remove monofilament from the upper branches of mangroves where birds roost and may become entangled.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1096 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes delivers a welcome speech to the volunteers that joined the NOAA Restoration Center staff and Tampa Baywatch to assist in the monofilament clean-up.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1097 thumbnail picture
Scott Gudes cradles an injured pelican that was attached to mangroves by monofilament. The bird will be rushed to volunteer land-based rehabilitators.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1098 thumbnail picture
An unidentified bird skull hangs in the branches of a mangrove where it reminds volunteers of the importance of the clean-up. When monofilament is left in roosting areas, birds will continue to perish.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000
1099 thumbnail picture
NOAA's John Iliff and a bird rehabilitator, Lee Fox, introduce a poster created to educate volunteers about how to rescue injured birds.
Tampa Bay, Florida November 4, 2000

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013