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NOAA's Restoration Center Collection
Catalog of Images

1150 thumbnail picture
Lowering the reef materials into the water to construct the reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1151 thumbnail picture
Lowering the reef materials into the water to construct the reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1152 thumbnail picture
Lowering the reef materials into the water to construct the reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1153 thumbnail picture
Lowering the reef materials into the water to construct
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1154 thumbnail picture
The crane bucket moves from the barge to the water.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1155 thumbnail picture
Reef construction material on the barge.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1156 thumbnail picture
The crane and barge used to construct the cobble reef. The crane was owned by Harbor Marine Corp.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1157 thumbnail picture
The barge with reef construction materials on board.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1158 thumbnail picture
The reef construction operation.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1159 thumbnail picture
The reef construction operation.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1160 thumbnail picture
Close ups of the reef construction materials.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1161 thumbnail picture
The average size cobble used in construction of the reef was 8"-12" in diameter and/or 12"-18" diameter stone. The restoration project to construct "natural" reefs mimicked true natural reefs made of cobble. The density of lobsters on the newly constructed reefs is equal to or greater the natural reference areas.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1162 thumbnail picture
A diver inspects the reefs to ensure they are created according to specification.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1163 thumbnail picture
A diver inspects the reefs to ensure they are created according to specification.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1164 thumbnail picture
Construction of the reef underway.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1165 thumbnail picture
A suction sampling technique is used to determine settlement of lobsters on the reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1166 thumbnail picture
An adult, American lobster, Homarus americanus rests on the sea floor.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1167 thumbnail picture
An American lobster, Homarus americanus at the site where cobble reefs were placed to provide habitat in Dutch Harbor.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1168 thumbnail picture
A larval lobster in the water column.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1169 thumbnail picture
A drawing of an American lobster.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1170 thumbnail picture
An American lobster, Homarus americanus, seen among shell debris on the ocean bottom.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1171 thumbnail picture
An all blue specimen of Homarus americanus. Some scientists attribute variations in shell colors to diet.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1172 thumbnail picture
A close up of a microwire tag inserted into the ventral tail section of an early benthic stage lobster. Tags were used to identify lobsters placed on the reefs as part of the restoration work and associated research.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1173 thumbnail picture
A close up of a microwire tag inserted into the ventral tail section of an early benthic stage lobster. Tags were used to identify lobsters placed on the reefs as part of the restoration work and associated research.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County December 1996
1174 thumbnail picture
Juvenile lobsters were raised by University of Rhode Island researcher, Kathy Castro in individual "condo" units to prevent cannibalism. The cobble reefs were then seeded with the juvenile lobsters to determine if seeding would help to augment native populations.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1175 thumbnail picture
Two juvenile lobsters, Homarus americanus, begin to attack one another.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1176 thumbnail picture
An all blue juvenile specimen of Homarus americanus retreats after an attack.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1177 thumbnail picture
A juvenile American lobster rests in its "condo". The baby lobsters were raised to be placed at the cobble reef sites in Dutch Harbor, RI.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1178 thumbnail picture
Two baby American lobsters in a "condo" lock claws. American lobsters are cannibals and must be separated or they will kill and consume one another.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1179 thumbnail picture
A baby lobster is measured before having a microwire tag injected into its carapace. The microwire tagged lobsters were placed on the cobble reefs and later collected to determine recruitment and mortality rates.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1180 thumbnail picture
One of a series of images that shows the process of how researchers inject microwire tags into juvenile lobsters.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1181 thumbnail picture
One of a series of images that shows the process of how researchers inject microwire tags into juvenile lobsters.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1182 thumbnail picture
One of a series of images that shows the process of how researchers inject microwire tags into juvenile lobsters.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1183 thumbnail picture
One of a series of images that shows the process of how researchers inject microwire tags into juvenile lobsters.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1184 thumbnail picture
A baby lobster waving its claws after having a microwire tag injected into its carapace. The researchers handled all of the small lobsters with great care during and after the process of injecting the tags.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1185 thumbnail picture
A baby American lobster perched on the finger of a scientist clearly illustrates the approximate size of the hatchery reared lobsters that were placed on the cobble reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1186 thumbnail picture
A University of Rhode Island researcher examines a juvenile American lobster prior to its release in the wild.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1187 thumbnail picture
Two University of Rhode Island scientists examine American lobster juveniles before they are tagged and released onto the reefs located around Dutch Harbor.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1188 thumbnail picture
Researchers at The University of Rhode Island prepare to release the condo reared juvenile lobsters onto the cobble reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1189 thumbnail picture
A University of Rhode Island scientist prepares to insert a microwire tag into a juvenile lobster.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1190 thumbnail picture
Kathy Castro of the University of Rhode Island and John Catena of NOAA remove hatchery-reared American lobsters and place them into salt-water filled bags. The lobsters will then be transported to the cobble reefs in small batches and hand released onto the reefs. The process of raising, tagging and releasing the lobsters to study them was very time-consuming and labor intensive
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1191 thumbnail picture
Kathy Castro and John Catena examine the lobsters before diving to release them on the reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1192 thumbnail picture
John Catena and Kathy Castro place juvenile lobsters into bags to transport the lobsters onto the reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1193 thumbnail picture
John Catena of NOAA counts the number of lobsters in the bags before diving with the bag to hand release the lobsters onto the cobble reefs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1194 thumbnail picture
A bead of water drips from a bag of lobsters just before they are carried to the reefs by divers where they will be monitored to determine settlement and mortality rates.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1195 thumbnail picture
A bag of juvenile lobsters just before they are transported to the cobble reefs by divers.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1196 thumbnail picture
James Burgess, former director of the Restoration Center and Sally Yozell , former Deputy Assistant Secretary for NOAA, attend a ceremony to dedicate the lobster restoration projects.
Rhode Island, Dutch Island, Newport County Summer 1998
1197 thumbnail picture
A slide describing the purpose of the restoration at Sachuest Point Salt Marsh and the restoration partners.
1998
1198 thumbnail picture
A slide that outlines the objectives of the restoration work at Sachuest Point Salt Marsh.
1998
1199 thumbnail picture
A schematic that shows the restricted side of the marsh at Sachuest Point.
1998

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014