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NOAA's Restoration Center Collection
Catalog of Images

1250 thumbnail picture
The second image that shows the construction phase of placing the new culvert at Sachuest Marsh. The new 36 "culverts were installed where the road crosses the main creek. In this image the site is being prepared to receive the culvert.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
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The fourth image in this series shows the size of the culvert after it was placed where the main creek intersects the road. The new culvert will help to improve salt water exchange at Sachuest Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1252 thumbnail picture
Another view of the new culvert after it was placed at the intersection of the main creek and the road at Sachuest Point Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1253 thumbnail picture
The crane lifts the culvert and places it in the area that was prepared to hold the new culvert.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1254 thumbnail picture
A distant view of the specialized ditch digger at work.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1255 thumbnail picture
A series of images show the placement of the new culvert at Sachuest Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1256 thumbnail picture
A series of images show the placement of the new culvert at Sachuest Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1257 thumbnail picture
A series of images show the placement of the new culvert at Sachuest Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1258 thumbnail picture
A series of images show the placement of the new culvert at Sachuest Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1259 thumbnail picture
A series of images show the placement of the new culvert at Sachuest Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1260 thumbnail picture
Sachuest Marsh is a significant mosquito breeding area, restoration work at the marsh also included open water management techniques to control mosquitos.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1261 thumbnail picture
Widening the marsh channels at Sachuest Point Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI March 1998
1262 thumbnail picture
A US Fish and Wildlife volunteer assists with the lift nets. Lift nets were used before and after the restoration to sample resident fish populations to determine changes in productivity to the marsh, before and after restoration and to monitor restoration benefits.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1263 thumbnail picture
M.J. James-Pirri, a former NOAA scientist, checks the lift nets.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1264 thumbnail picture
Sampling the lift nets
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1265 thumbnail picture
M.J. Pirri and a US Fish and Wildlife volunteer monitor the lift nets and their catch at Sachuest Point Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1266 thumbnail picture
M.J. Pirri and a US Fish and Wildlife volunteer monitor the lift nets and their catch at Sachuest Point Marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1267 thumbnail picture
One of the secondary channels at Sachuest Marsh during a summer high course tide. Several months after the restoration, the marsh fully recovered. The newly dug channels in the restored marsh provide passage for small fish and allow better exchange of saline waters in the hinterland regions of the marsh.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1268 thumbnail picture
Mary Jane Pirri, a former NOAA scientist, monitors a lift net at the Sachuest Point Marsh. The marsh, in full summer, is lush and green. There is no evidence of the restoration work that took place just months earlier.
Sachuest Point Marsh, Newport County, RI Summer 1998
1269 thumbnail picture
A slide describing the purpose of the eelgrass restoration and its partners. In June 1996 NOAA scientists transplanted 7000 eelgrass plants from Charlestown Pond to ten locations in Narragansett Bay. The project team returned the following September and found mixed results. In June 1997, the team expanded two of the successful sites and employed a new technique by transplanting turf.
1997
1270 thumbnail picture
A schematic showing the plot layout for the transplant process.
1997
1271 thumbnail picture
A single blade of Zostera marina, eelgrass, seen from underwater.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1272 thumbnail picture
A plug of Zostera marina just before transplanting.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1273 thumbnail picture
An underwater view of the transplant process.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1274 thumbnail picture
A plug of Zostera marina, shown after transplant into one of the the ten locations in Narragansett Bay, RI.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1275 thumbnail picture
A plug of eelgrass, Zostera marina, shown just before it is transplanted. Note the u shaped "staple" that is used to secure it to the bottom.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1276 thumbnail picture
NOAA scientists at one of the transplant sites.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1277 thumbnail picture
The first in a series of three images that illustrate the process of collecting donor eelgrass plants for transplant.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1278 thumbnail picture
The second in a series of three images that illustrate the process of collecting donor eelgrass plants for transplant.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1279 thumbnail picture
The third in a series of three images that illustrate the process of collecting donor eelgrass plants for transplant.
Rhode Island, Charlestown Pond June 1996
1280 thumbnail picture
The first in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf. Scientists worked in dry suits in the cold Bay waters and used surface air supplies at the mostly shallow sites. Zostera marina requires a specific set of physical conditions to thrive. The plants need light, nutrients and protection from excessive wave energy.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1281 thumbnail picture
The second in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1282 thumbnail picture
The third in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1283 thumbnail picture
The fourth in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1284 thumbnail picture
The fifth in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1285 thumbnail picture
The sixth in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1286 thumbnail picture
The last in a series of images showing NOAA scientists at the 1997 transplant site just before transplanting the eelgrass turf.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1287 thumbnail picture
John Catena of NOAA watches the transplant process after handing trays of eelgrass turf to the scientists for transplanting.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1288 thumbnail picture
NOAA scientists prepare to receive trays of eelgrass turf for transplanting at one of the sites.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1289 thumbnail picture
John Catena hands a tray of eelgrass turf over the side of the boat to the scientists in the water.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1290 thumbnail picture
A RI EPA vessel was donated for the 1997 transplant operation. The staging area was off Prudence Island.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1291 thumbnail picture
Mark Fonseca, a NOAA scientist Beaufort Lab, takes a break after transplanting eelgrass at one of the transplant sites.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1292 thumbnail picture
A tray of eelgrass turf and plugs ready for transplant. Eelgrass, Zostera marina contributes substantially to the health of coastal ecosystems. Eelgrass meadows provide shelter and spawning habitat for fish and shellfish and the living blades or leaves provide food for waterfowl like brant and Canada Geese. And eelgrass is a critical element of the Bay's detrital food web.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1293 thumbnail picture
Mark Fonseca demonstrates the transplant process to reporters in the first of a series of images that illustrate the underwater process from a beach off Prudence Island, RI.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
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Mark Fonseca demonstrates the transplant process to reporters in the second of a series of images that illustrate the underwater process from a beach off Prudence Island, RI.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1295 thumbnail picture
Mark Fonseca demonstrates the transplant process to reporters in the third of a series of images that illustrate the underwater process from a beach off Prudence Island, RI.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1296 thumbnail picture
Mark Fonseca demonstrates the transplant process to reporters in the last of a series of images that illustrate the underwater process from a beach off Prudence Island, RI.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1297 thumbnail picture
Judd Kenworthy, NOAA scientist Beaufort Lab, shows the cages that were designed to protect the newly transplanted eelgrass plants from predation by small crabs.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1298 thumbnail picture
The transplant team on the EPA boat after the transplant process.
Rhode Island, Dutch Harbor June 1997
1299 thumbnail picture
John Torgan of Save the Bay RI volunteered services to the transplant team and to reporters and the NOAA film crew during the 1997 transplants.
June 1997

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013