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NOAA's Restoration Center Collection
Catalog of Images

100 thumbnail picture
Small boats, rigid hull inflatables, were used to support the restoration effort. Divers left the Cunan Law, where they were housed and fed, and were transported to the reef by the tenders.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
101 thumbnail picture
A small tender with divers at the restoration site.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
102 thumbnail picture
A brain coral split apart by the Fortuna Reefer grounding.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
103 thumbnail picture
A brain coral scarred by the ship grounding
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
104 thumbnail picture
The reef surrounding Mona Island contains old growth stands of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta. This photograph shows an Elkhorn coral damaged by the ship grounding and, later, by the removal of the ship from the reef.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
105 thumbnail picture
A healthy stand of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, typically found at the reef prior to the Fortuna Reefer grounding.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
106 thumbnail picture
A severed branch of Elkhorn coral at the grounding site.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
107 thumbnail picture
Severed branches from an Elkhorn coral stand at Mona Island.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
108 thumbnail picture
Coral branches that fell in sand corridors bordering the reef are stressed when they become abraded by rolling in the sand.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
109 thumbnail picture
A diver uses a pneumatic drill to create a hole in the reef framework to secure loose coral fragments.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
110 thumbnail picture
A diver moves a loose fragment of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, in preparation to reattach the fragment.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
111 thumbnail picture
A diver replaces gear before continuing to work.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
112 thumbnail picture
A diver prepares to reattach an Elkhorn coral fragment.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
113 thumbnail picture
A diagram shows the impacted area and the number of corals reattached, within each section, during the restoration.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
114 thumbnail picture
One diver prepares to attach coral, another diver works using surface supplied air.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
115 thumbnail picture
Two divers work to reattach a large fragment of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta. The coral in the background has been attached to the reef framework using stainless steel wires. The wire binds the coral fragment to the living coral where it is expected to reattach to the live coral.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
116 thumbnail picture
Close up of a diver after a coral is wired into place. A curious wrasse, in the foreground, watches the diver.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
117 thumbnail picture
A wired fragment of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta. Restoration experts predict that wire used in the restoration effort will be overgrown by new coral growth within a few years time.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
118 thumbnail picture
A coral fragment reattached using experimental plastic ties. The use of plastic ties proved to be unsuccessful because the straps could not be tightened enough to secure the corals.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
119 thumbnail picture
A healthy stand of coral reef
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
120 thumbnail picture
A close-up image of the stainless steel wire used to reattach a coral fragment to the reef.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
121 thumbnail picture
This image shows the reef framework crushed at ground zero impact.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
122 thumbnail picture
Numerous fragments of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, lie on the reef damaged by the grounding. In the foreground, some have already been reattached.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
123 thumbnail picture
A close up of healthy Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, missed by the grounding.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
124 thumbnail picture
A coral fragment is cross-wired to keep it secure in the high energy environment at the fringing reef at Mona Island.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
125 thumbnail picture
A sand corridor between the spur and groove formation of the reef. The restoration effort focused on keeping coral fragments off the reef floor and out of the sand corridors where they would become abraded and scoured.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
126 thumbnail picture
Severed coral fragments on the edge of the reef buttress
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
127 thumbnail picture
A hand shaped fragment of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, is wired tightly to the reef.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
128 thumbnail picture
A coral fragment is wired in two places to keep it secure.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
129 thumbnail picture
In the foreground, an Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, fragment is reattached to the reef. Stainless steel nails are holding the wire in place.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
130 thumbnail picture
A coral fragment reattached using the experimental plastic ties that were later discarded in favor of stainless steel wire that could be tightened more securely.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
131 thumbnail picture
Close up of Elkhorn coral, Acropora palmatta, where a coral branch has been previously severed.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
132 thumbnail picture
A mooring buoy put in place by the restoration team prevented the need to to place large potentially damaging anchors on the reef.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
133 thumbnail picture
Wired coral fragments in a monitoring station are indicated by the fiberglass rebar in the foreground of the photograph. Monitoring stations were established to determine the success of the restoration effort. The disc to the left of the photograph also distinguishes this location as a monitoring station.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
134 thumbnail picture
This image shows a control site at the Mona Island reef. Control sites were selected at random to measure conditions of the reef outside the impacted area. Control sites help scientists determine the success of the restoration effort by later comparing conditions at the control site with those within the restoration areas.
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
135 thumbnail picture
A monitoring site within the restoration area
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
136 thumbnail picture
A cross-wired coral fragment within the monitoring area
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
137 thumbnail picture
Corals within a monitoring site at the Mona Island restoration area
Puerto Rico, Mona Island Summer, 1997
138 thumbnail picture
A view from Atchafalaya Bay showing the project area in the background and the created marsh platform.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
139 thumbnail picture
The dredge pipeline corridor as seen from the shoreline.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
140 thumbnail picture
An aerial view of the created wetlands in the containment area.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
141 thumbnail picture
An aerial close-up view of the created wetlands with a prominent lobe in the foreground.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
142 thumbnail picture
Lake Chapeau in the foreground.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
143 thumbnail picture
A clear aerial view of Lake Chapeau in the right of the image.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
144 thumbnail picture
Lake Chapeau, the created wetlands can be seen in the foreground of the photograph.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
145 thumbnail picture
A close-up view of the created wetlands at Lake Chapeau.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish Summer 1999
146 thumbnail picture
Plug site 7 looking northwest along the existing oil access canal. A shell and rip rap plug was constructed across a section of the existing canal which measured approximately 157 feet wide by 10 feet deep.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish January 15 1997
147 thumbnail picture
Plug site 7 looking at the south bank of the existing oil access canal. The white PVC pipe marks one end of the proposed plug.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish January 15 1997
148 thumbnail picture
Locust Bayou between plug site 7 and the existing southeast trending oil access canal. This 6500 linear foot section of Locust Bayou silted up and was dredged out to its natural depth prior to construction of the project's plugs.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish January 15 1997
149 thumbnail picture
Lake Chapeau shoreline. The broken marshes west of Lake Chapeau were restored by the dredging component of this project.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish January 15 1997

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013