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NOAA's Restoration Center Collection
Catalog of Images

150 thumbnail picture
Marsh fragmentation. The mud was pumped in to fill the fragmented marsh. The marsh was then planted as part of the restoration.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish 1997-1999
151 thumbnail picture
Marsh fragmentation. The mud was pumped in to fill the fragmented marsh. The marsh was then planted as part of the restoration.
Louisiana, Lake Chapeau, Terrebonne Parish 1997-1999
152 thumbnail picture
Andy Lipsky of Save the Bay, RI staff assists with the clean-up of Mussachuck Creek.
Rhode Island, Echo Lake Barrington, Bristol County
153 thumbnail picture
An aerial view of the restoration area shows where the fish ladder was installed. The ladder was installed to increase spawning habitat for Alewives, Alosa pseudoharengus and Blueback herring, Alosa aestivalis.
Rhode Island, Echo Lake Barrington, Bristol County
154 thumbnail picture
An aerial view of the Mussachuck Creek system indicates the areas of tidal restriction.
Rhode Island, Echo Lake Barrington, Bristol County
155 thumbnail picture
A view of Mussachuck Creek, the creek runs east to west. Echo Lake runs north of the creek.
Rhode Island, Echo Lake Barrington, Bristol County
156 thumbnail picture
A site visit to the creek by restoration specialists.
Rhode Island, Echo Lake Barrington, Bristol County
157 thumbnail picture
Save the Bay staff members clean the creek.
Rhode Island, Echo Lake Barrington, Bristol County
158 thumbnail picture
The Reiner brothers own the property that contains Haskell Slough. The two brothers were also hired to do the construction and provided the equipment for the restoration.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
159 thumbnail picture
At the lower portion of the slough, a large pond complex was constructed as a part of the restoration. The pond is about one and a half acres.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
160 thumbnail picture
A crane places root wads in the channel that was constructed as a part of the restoration.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
161 thumbnail picture
A section of the upper channel with large woody debris placed in the newly constructed channel.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
162 thumbnail picture
The typical unaltered pond/slough system that existed before the restoration. the restoration connected a series of ponds to allow fish to pass into and out of their spawning habitat. The image above is a good example of prime juvenile salmon and steelhead trout rearing habitat.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
163 thumbnail picture
NOAA staff survey the restoration site. This is another segment of the restoration area. Note the woody debris in the channel.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
164 thumbnail picture
A map shows the location of Haskell Slough as it existed in 1975.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
165 thumbnail picture
A typical segment of restored channel between ponds. Note the natural gravel in the stream. This gravel provides excellent spawning habitat.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
166 thumbnail picture
A portion of restored habitat is seen in the middle of the pond-like area and to the rear of the image.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
167 thumbnail picture
A close-up image of restored channel with woody debris in-stream.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
168 thumbnail picture
Dale Reiner and his brother are on the left. The Reiners and a Northwest Chinook Recovery board member, Rusty Wailes, examine the restored area.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
169 thumbnail picture
A group of volunteers, on site, place a hemp blanket and plant Willow and Red Oiser Dogwood on the banks of the restored areas.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
170 thumbnail picture
High-water flood events bring fish in and out of the system.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
171 thumbnail picture
This image was taken immediately after construction and restoration were completed. The flood occured within hours of restoration and brought chum salmon into the system. The salmon began spawning to the delight of onlookers.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
172 thumbnail picture
The Reiner brothers watch the arrival of the salmon.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
173 thumbnail picture
One of the channels that was excavated to provide access between the pond system to provide access for fish to move from pond to pond downstream.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
174 thumbnail picture
Looking at the outlet of the system with the river at flood stage.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
175 thumbnail picture
The lower region of Haskell Slough
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
176 thumbnail picture
Construction equipment was moved out of the flood plain, after construction completed but before the November 4th flooding event that brought the chum salmon into the system.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
177 thumbnail picture
A typical channel between two ponds. This was taken after the volunteers vegetated the area.
Skykomish River, Monroe County, Washington November 1998
178 thumbnail picture
A group of volunteers pose with Representative Lynn Woolsey, a big supporter of NOAA's community restoration efforts.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
179 thumbnail picture
One of the volunteers from a local school plants native vegetation along the creek. When the vegetation matures it will provide shelter and food for steelhead trout returning to the creek to spawn. Vegetation also provides shade that cools water temperatures. Juvenile salmonids do not thrive in warm water conditions.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
180 thumbnail picture
One of the seedlings being prepared for planting along creek. Volunteer school children planted more than 2000 native trees along Brush Creek to provide shade food and shelter for steelhead trout.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
181 thumbnail picture
A group of volunteer school children are photographed with representative Lynn Woolsey.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
182 thumbnail picture
Brush Creek is beautiful but it lost its vegetation when the waterway was channelized for flood control. The Brush Creek restoration project provided funds to assist in the planting of 2000 native trees to provide food, shelter and shade for steelhead trout.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
183 thumbnail picture
A view of the native vegetation that was typically found at Brush Creek. The community restoration work provided funds to plant 2000 trees along the creek.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
184 thumbnail picture
A group of student volunteers plant native trees along Brush Creek to revegetate areas along the creek that were devegetated when the waterway was channelized for flood control.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
185 thumbnail picture
Over 200 school children planted 2000 native trees along Brush Creek to revegetate the stream bed to provide optimum spawning conditions for steelhead trout.
California, Brush Creek, Santa Rosa, Sonoma County
186 thumbnail picture
Student volunteers from the United Anglers work in the creek to clear it of debris. The students have worked at Adobe Creek, planting vegetation, cleaning the stream and working to restore water flow to the creek for close to 15 years. The students are led by Tom Furrer their high school science teacher and the founder of United Anglers of Casa Grande High School.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
187 thumbnail picture
A group of student volunteers with Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey, a supporter of the restoration at Adobe Creek.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
188 thumbnail picture
Heavy equipment places the boulders that were used to construct the fish pools.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
189 thumbnail picture
A high-flow event as water rushes over the newly constructed fish pools.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
190 thumbnail picture
Looking straight down at the fish pools, post restoration during a high-flow event.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
191 thumbnail picture
Volunteers plant naturally occurring vegetation at the stream bed. When the vegetation is mature it will help to cool the stream and provide favorable conditions for spawning.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
192 thumbnail picture
Tom Furrer, the high school teacher, began the United Anglers of Case Grande as a way to actively engage students. Tom Furrer and another volunteer work to clean parts of the creek.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
193 thumbnail picture
Three students pose with a steelhead trout at their fish hatchery. The students raised nearly over a half a million dollars to construct a fish hatchery.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
194 thumbnail picture
Looking up towards the old culvert at the newly constructed fish pools.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
195 thumbnail picture
Student volunteers clear debris from the river.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
196 thumbnail picture
Jim Bybee and Rick Wantuck of NOAA examine small steelhead trout in the creek.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
197 thumbnail picture
A sign constructed by the students thanks NOAA for its role in the construction of the fish pools.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
198 thumbnail picture
The sign thanking NOAA for its assistance in the construction.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996
199 thumbnail picture
A student plants small native shrubs and trees in the riparian corridor to keep the stream cool.
California, Adobe Creek, Petaluma, Sonoma County 1996

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014