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NOAA's Coral Kingdom Collection
Catalog of Images

3450 thumbnail picture
Spotted eagle ray
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3451 thumbnail picture
Southern stingray
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3452 thumbnail picture
Southern stingray. Note the barb visible on the tail
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3453 thumbnail picture
Southern stingray.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3454 thumbnail picture
Green moray eel
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3455 thumbnail picture
Green moray eel
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3456 thumbnail picture
Green moray eel
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3457 thumbnail picture
Green moray eel
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3458 thumbnail picture
Black durgon
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3459 thumbnail picture
Trumpetfish
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3460 thumbnail picture
Saucereye porgy (Calamus calamus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3461 thumbnail picture
Rock beauty
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3462 thumbnail picture
Rock beauty
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3463 thumbnail picture
Squirrel fish
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3464 thumbnail picture
Squirrel fish
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3465 thumbnail picture
Schoolmaster snapper (Lutjanus apodus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3466 thumbnail picture
Schoolmaster snapper (Lutjanus apodus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3467 thumbnail picture
Long-spine porcupine fish (Diodon holocanthus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3468 thumbnail picture
White grunt (Haemulon plumieri)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3469 thumbnail picture
Bluestriped grunt (Haemulon sciurus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3470 thumbnail picture
French grunt (Haemulon flavolineatum)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3471 thumbnail picture
Bluestriped grunt (Haemulon sciurus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3472 thumbnail picture
Stoplight parrotfish supermale (Sparisoma viride)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3473 thumbnail picture
Stoplight parrotfish supermale (Sparisoma viride)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3474 thumbnail picture
Stoplight parrotfish supermale (Sparisoma viride)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3475 thumbnail picture
Black durgon (Melichthys niger)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3476 thumbnail picture
Black durgon (Melichthys niger)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3477 thumbnail picture
Black durgon (Melichthys niger) in center, stoplight parrotfish (Sparisoma viride)in lower right, blue tang (Acanthurus coeruleus) , and parrotfish ( Sparisoma sp.) upper right.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3478 thumbnail picture
Gray angelfish (Pomacanthus arcuatus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3479 thumbnail picture
Gray angelfish (Pomacanthus arcuatus)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3480 thumbnail picture
Queen angelfish (Holacanthus ciliaris)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3481 thumbnail picture
Queen triggerfish (Balistes vetula)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3482 thumbnail picture
Indigo hamlet (Hypoplectrus indigo)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3483 thumbnail picture
Anemone
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3484 thumbnail picture
Red sponge
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3485 thumbnail picture
Yellow tube sponge
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3486 thumbnail picture
Yellow tube sponge
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2003
3487 thumbnail picture
Sponge biodiversity and morphotypes at the lip the wall site in 60 feet of water . Included are the yellow tube sponge, Aplysina fistularis, the purple vase sponge, Niphates digitalis, the red encrusting sponge, Spiratrella coccinea, and the gray rope sponge, Callyspongia sp.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 23
3488 thumbnail picture
Xestospongia muta, the barrel sponge, may live for 100 years and grow to over 6 feet tall. While populations have declined at sites throughout the Caribbean, they appear to be quite healthy on Little Cayman Island.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 23
3489 thumbnail picture
Some sponges, like this vase sponge (Callyspongia plicifera), do not host a microbial community that is substantially different from that found in the surrounding water column. Other sponges contain microorganisms that are not commonly found in the water and they are considered bacteriosponges.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 25
3490 thumbnail picture
This brown sponge (Agelas conifera) is common on both shallow and deep Caribbean reefs, but grows to enormous proportions on deeper reefs where it can orm long creeping arms extending into the depths.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 25
3491 thumbnail picture
The liver sponge, Plakortis sp., produces a series of important chemical compounds that deter predators and have biomedical antimicrobial activity.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 23
3492 thumbnail picture
Agelas conifera is a common sponge of the Caribbean over a broad depth gradient. This makes it a great model organism to study phenotypic plasticity.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 23
3493 thumbnail picture
Purple sea fan (Gorgonia ventalina)
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands
3494 thumbnail picture
Several species of gorgonian octocorals occur on deep reefs. Nicella schmitti, shown here, lacks zooxanthellae, but feeds on particulates and small zooplankton that are abundant along walls.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 27
3495 thumbnail picture
Plating Agaricids are common down to about 200 ft on the Little Cayman walls, in shallower water they tend to form smaller plates with upright ridges. These differences in morphology may be a mechanism to efficiently gather light for their zooxanthellae.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 27
3496 thumbnail picture
One of the more common deep reef corals on the Little Cayman walls are Mycetophyllia sp. since they prefer low light conditions. In fact, on shallow reefs, Mycetophyllia polyps are often retracted during the day.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 27
3497 thumbnail picture
Team TZ members conducting a site survey at a depth of 40 feet. The team members are taking notes of what they see along the tape in 10 cm increments and 50 cm on either side of the tape. They recorded all sponges and corals they see which is correlated with position information.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007
3498 thumbnail picture
A Hawksbill turtle feeding on a sponge.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 30
3499 thumbnail picture
Although many of the species found at depth will likely be different than those seen on shallow reefs, some mobile organisms can actually move between shallow and deep reefs. This hawksbill sea turtle feeds on sponges which are common in both deep and shallow reefs.
Caribbean Sea, Cayman Islands 2007 May 22

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Last Updated:
May 12, 2014