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NOAA In Space Collection
Catalog of Images

100 thumbnail picture
Launch of NOAA satellite
101 thumbnail picture
Launch of NOAA satellite
102 thumbnail picture
Launch of NOAA satellite
103 thumbnail picture
Ozone analysis map showing "ozone hole" over Antarctic continent. Data obtained from NOAA-9 operational environmental satellite. Data were acquired by the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument.
1987 October 15
104 thumbnail picture
Ozone analysis map showing "ozone hole" over Antarctic continent. Data obtained Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument. Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SBUV/2) instrument.
1987 October 15
105 thumbnail picture
Scientist inspecting early TIROS satellite components. In the immediate foreground are two TV cameras with a tape recorder in between.
106 thumbnail picture
Mounting early TIROS satellite on nose of rocket prior to launch. TIROS satellites were 18-sided polygons, 22 1/2 inches high with a 42-inch diameter. They weighed between 270 and 300 pounds.
107 thumbnail picture
Securing cover for TIROS V satellite prior to launching. Lettering on nose cone reads: CAUTION EXPLOSIVE DEVICES ARE SET IN THIS VEHICLE CONSULT DIRECTIONS BEFORE HANDLING. The bulbous nose fairing protected the satellite during its ride through the atmosphere into space.
108 thumbnail picture
Calibrating the cameras on a TIROS satellite.
109 thumbnail picture
Making adjustments to TIROS II satellite prior to launch. Small square objects are 9,260 solar cells. TIROS II was the first meteorological satellite to have infra-red sensors as well as television cameras. It was launched November 23, 1960 and weighed 280 pounds.
1960, November
110 thumbnail picture
TIROS I satellite on test stand during preliminary test stage. In: "Weather Analysis from Satellite Observations, " U.S. Navy Research Facility, December 1960. Figure 1.4.
1960 Circa
111 thumbnail picture
Overhead view of a TIROS satellite showing interior arrangement of satellite sensing packages including TV cameras and infra-red sensors. In: "TIROS A Story of Achievement" RCA, February 28, 1964, Figure 2.
1964 Circa
112 thumbnail picture
Diagram of orbital path of TIROS satellite after launch. First orbit is to the right and increase to most recent orbit on the left. Note that inclined orbit only takes TIROS satellite to approximately 50 North Latitude and 58 South Latitude. Each orbit took approximately 117 minutes.
1960 Circa
113 thumbnail picture
Diagram of TIROS II launch sequence.
1960 Circa
114 thumbnail picture
Complex Number 17 at Cape Canaveral where TIROS-carrying Thor-Delta rockets were launched.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1961 Circa
115 thumbnail picture
Second stage of Thor-Able rocket being set in place prior to launching TIROS I. In: "Weather Analysis from Satellite Observations, " U.S. Navy Research Facility, December 1960. Figure 1.2.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1960 March
116 thumbnail picture
The launching of TIROS I, the first meteorological satellite.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1960 April 01, 0640 EST
117 thumbnail picture
The launching of TIROS I, the first meteorological satellite. In: "Weather Analysis from Satellite Observations, " U.S. Navy Research Facility, December 1960. Figure 1.3.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1960 April 01, 0640 EST
118 thumbnail picture
TIROS II ready for launch. This satellite was launched on November 23, 1960. Launch vehicle was a Thor-Delta rocket that placed the satellite in an inclined orbit (50 degrees to Equator) at about 420 nautical miles. Cover of "Weather Bureau Topics" for November 1960.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1960 November
119 thumbnail picture
A TIROS night launch on a Thor-Delta rocket.
1961 Circa
120 thumbnail picture
The Command and Data Acquisition (CDA) station at Wallops Island. Large antenna on left receives TIROS TV imagery. Immediately to the right of this antenna is a smaller antenna that receives and transmits navigation and control commands.
121 thumbnail picture
An 85-foot diameter parabolic antenna used to send commands and receive information from meteorological satellites.
Gilmore Creek, near Fairbanks, Alaska 1962 Circa
122 thumbnail picture
An automatic picture transmission (APT) receiving antenna mounted on the top of the Weather Bureau National Weather Satellite Center. This was an eight-turn, helical, 14-foot long antenna.
Suitland, Maryland 1964 Circa
123 thumbnail picture
Technicians operating electronic equipment for recording and displaying TIROS television, infrared, and telemetry signals.
Gilmore Creek, near Fairbanks, Alaska 1962 Circa
124 thumbnail picture
The Gilmore Creek Command and Data Acquisition (CDA) station.
Gilmore Creek, near Fairbanks, Alaska 1962 Circa
125 thumbnail picture
Dr. Sigmund Fritz, chief of the Weather Bureau's Meteorological Satellite Section of the Office of Research in 1958. Note that this pre-dated the launch of TIROS I. Following the launch, Dr. Fritz became first Chief Scientist of the new Meteorological Satellite Laboratory.
1960 Circa
126 thumbnail picture
David Johnson, appointed chief of the Weather Bureau's Meteorological Satellite Laboratory in 1960 following the launch of TIROS I.
1960 Circa
127 thumbnail picture
Archived tapes of telemetry data received from TIROS I. In: "Astronautics", June 1960.
1960 June
128 thumbnail picture
Artist's conception of NIMBUS meteorological satellite system. In: "Plan for a National Meteorological Satellite System", produced by the National Coordinating Committee for Aviation Meteorology, April 1961.
1961
129 thumbnail picture
Artist's conception of the AEROS meteorological satellite system. Basically, this is the concept for the GOES series of satellites. In: "Plan for a National Meteorological Satellite System", produced by the National Coordinating Committee for Aviation Meteorology, April 1961.
1961
130 thumbnail picture
Arrangement of components on TIROS VII baseplate. In: "Plan for a National Meteorological Satellite System", produced by the National Coordinating Committee for Aviation Meteorology, April 1961.
1961
131 thumbnail picture
TIROS performance summary as of February 10, 1964. In: "TIROS A Story of Achievement" RCA, February 28, 1964, Table 5.
1964 February 10
132 thumbnail picture
Among the most famous of early satellite weather photographs. This image showed a "square" cloud close to the Oklahoma-Texas border. Within hours this cloud enlarged and spread northward bringing hailstones and tornadoes to central Oklahoma. A TIROS I image.
Oklahoma 1960 May 02
133 thumbnail picture
Experience with TIROS showed that bright clouds with relatively well-defined edges and isolated from a main cloud mass, could be indicators of severe weather Shortly after this photograph, the southernmost cloud spawned a tornado. TIROS I, orbit 820.
Midwest of the United States 1960 May 27, 1719 CST
134 thumbnail picture
TIROS V image of Typhoon Ruth showing well-defined eye. Approximately 300 miles south-southeast of Tokyo. Winds were at 125 knots at time of photo.
Western Tropical Pacific Ocean 1962 August 18
135 thumbnail picture
Actinoform or radial clouds as seen by TIROS V. Photograph centered at 7S, 92W. Temperature inversion in which temperature rises with altitude was prevalent in this area inhibiting further convection.
Western Tropical Pacific Ocean 1963 Circa
136 thumbnail picture
Sea ice analysis in the Gulf of St. Lawrence showing dramatic change in one week . Images photographed by TIROS II on orbit 1763, March 23, and orbit 1850, March 29.
1961 March
137 thumbnail picture
A remarkable area of cellular stratocumulus as photographed by NIMBUS I. This cloud formation was observed over the tropical eastern North Pacific.
1964 September 6 1930 GMT
138 thumbnail picture
Arctic regions snow and ice over Canadian islands west of Greenland. Low level clouds are seen over intervening water. The center fiducial mark is over Lancaster Sound near 74.5 N, 85W. Devon Island is visible at top and peninsulas of Baffin Island appear in the lower portion of the photo. NIMBUS I AVCS photograph. Picture of the Month, "Monthly Weather Review," March 1965.
1964 September 16 1557 GMT
139 thumbnail picture
Iceland with sea ice to the north (A), a frontal band to the south (E), and parallel bands of cumuliform clouds to the east (B). TIROS IX photograph, pass 715/714, camera 2, frame 2.
1965 March 22 1205 GMT
140 thumbnail picture
Ice floes as seen in Canada's Gulf of St. Lawrence as imaged by TIROS II. In: "TIROS A Story of Achievement" RCA, February 28, 1964, Figure 8a.
1961 March
141 thumbnail picture
A large storm vortex imaged by TIROS VI. In: "TIROS A Story of Achievement" RCA, February 28, 1964, Figure 10c.
1963 Circa
142 thumbnail picture
Hurricane Anna, the first hurricane detected by an orbiting satellite as imaged by TIROS III. In: "TIROS A Story of Achievement" RCA, February 28, 1964,
1961 July
143 thumbnail picture
A large spiraling cloud system as seen by TIROS VI. In: "TIROS A Story of Achievement" RCA, February 28, 1964, Figure 12a.
1963 Circa
144 thumbnail picture
Wave clouds associated with air flow over the Appalachian Mountains. Great Lakes show to the west. Photo taken from TIROS VII, pass 4363, camera 1, frame 10. Picture of the Month, "Monthly Weather Review," June 1964.
1964 April 9 1309 GMT
145 thumbnail picture
Edge of cloud mass over western Mexico believed to be associated with the jet stream. Clouds mainly altocumulus and dense cirrus. TIROS VII, pass 2292/2291, frame 4. Picture of the Month, "Monthly Weather Review," March 1964.
1964 January 7 1919 GMT
146 thumbnail picture
TIROS VIII Automatic Picture Transmission Camera image of Baja California. In: "The Best of TIROS," NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, 1965.
1964 February
147 thumbnail picture
TIROS VII orbit 4569 R/O 7679 image of Italy and Sicily. In: "The Best of TIROS," NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, 1965.
1964 April 23 101830 GMT
148 thumbnail picture
TIROS IX orbit 0022 image of Antarctica showing Ross Sea Ice Shelf. In: "The Best of TIROS," NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, 1965.
1965 January 23
149 thumbnail picture
TIROS VII orbit 7680 R/O 7679 image of Alaska and the Aleutian Islands. In: "The Best of TIROS," NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center, 1965.
1964 November 19

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