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NOAA In Space Collection
Catalog of Images

250 thumbnail picture
Graphic of briefcase sticker art lauding NOAA A-D, the first of the TIROS-N polar-orbiting satellites. Only NOAA-A and NOAA-C ultimately became operational .
1979 Circa
251 thumbnail picture
Graphic of ITOS satellite in orbit.
1971 Circa
252 thumbnail picture
Graphic of ITOS satellite in orbit.
1971 Circa
253 thumbnail picture
Graphic of TIROS-N circling the Earth.
1978 Circa
254 thumbnail picture
Graphic of the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite, the forerunner of the GOES satellites.
1972 Circa
255 thumbnail picture
Graphic of constellation of GOES satellites needed to view all continents except Antarctica. Antarctica is viewed by polar-orbiting satellites.
1975 Circa
256 thumbnail picture
Artist's rendition of GOES D/E/F series of satellites in orbit.
1980 Circa
257 thumbnail picture
Artist's rendition of GOES D/E/F series of satellites in orbit.
1980 Circa
258 thumbnail picture
Working on ESSA-7, designated TOS-E prior to launch. Satellite was launched August 16, 1968.
1968 Summer
259 thumbnail picture
ESSA-9, designated TOS-G prior to launch, shown during final checkout prior to being placed aboard launch vehicle. ESSA-9 was launched February 26, 1969, at 0247 A.M.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1969 February
260 thumbnail picture
Graphic of ITOS system data flow.
1969 Circa
261 thumbnail picture
Graphic of overall ITOS system.
1969 Circa
262 thumbnail picture
GOES-A, the first operational Geostationary Orbiting Environmental Satellite, being prepared for launch. GOES-A was redesignated GOES-1 following launch on October 16, 1975.
Florida, Cape Canaveral 1975 September
263 thumbnail picture
An early GOES satellite.
1975 Circa
264 thumbnail picture
GOES-A undergoes checks at Aeronutronic Ford facility.
Palo Alto, California 1975
265 thumbnail picture
Working on ESSA-5 prior to launch.
1967 April
266 thumbnail picture
Scientist working on GOES-D model satellite prior to launching.
1980 Circa
267 thumbnail picture
Preparing a TIROS-N satellite for launch.
268 thumbnail picture
An early image from Applications Technology Satellite 1 (ATS-1). This satellite was launched into orbit on December 7, 1966 and was the prototype for the GOES series of satellites as well as for many modern communications satellites.
1966 December 11 1744 EST
269 thumbnail picture
Applications Technology Satellite 3 (ATS-3) image of the western hemisphere. The ATS satellites were forerunners of the GOES family of satellites. Tropical Storm Becky is churning in the NE Gulf of Mexico.
1970 July 21 1402
270 thumbnail picture
A composite image of the northern hemisphere obtained from ESSA 5 polar orbiting satellite data. Eight tropical storms are active in this image.
1967 September 14
271 thumbnail picture
Occluded vortex and frontal system as seen from ESSA 5.
1967 June 3
272 thumbnail picture
An infrared image transmitted from NOAA 2 satellite showing the East Coast of North America from the Gaspe Peninsula to northern Florida. A frontal system is offshore with "cloud streets" extending back to the west. This cold front brought low temperatures to the eastern United States. The image was sensed by the very high resolution radiometer with 1/2 mi. resolution.
1972 December 18
273 thumbnail picture
NOAA-3 visible range VHRR image of Hurricanes Ione (left) and Kirsten (right.) The rare effect of two interacting hurricanes is termed the Fujiwhara effect.
1974 August 24 1749 GMT
274 thumbnail picture
GOES image of North America with storm system over southern states and frontal system off the East Coast.
1982 April 4 1700
275 thumbnail picture
GOES image of North America with storm system over North Carolina and frontal system off the East Coast.
1982 October 24
276 thumbnail picture
GOES image of North America. Weak band of rain on the eastern seaboard. Bright thunderstorm clouds extend along a frontal system from the Central Gulf Coast states through the Midwest to the eastern Great Lakes. Patchy rain clouds are over the Pacific Northwest whle spotty snow clouds blanket the northern Rocky Mountain states.
1982 December 3
277 thumbnail picture
GOES image of North America. Large tropical storm off Baja California. Frontal sytem over upper Midwest. Tropical Storm Diana off the east coast of Florida. This storm had attained tropical storm status just a few hours before.
1984 September 8 1630
278 thumbnail picture
GOES image of eastern North America. Tropical Storm Diana off the coast of Florida.
1984 September 8 1730
279 thumbnail picture
GOES image of North America. Large tropical storm off Baja California. Frontal sytem over upper Midwest. Tropical Storm Diana off the east coast of Florida.
1984 September 9 1630
280 thumbnail picture
GOES image of North America. Remains of Tropical Storm Marie off Southern California. Hurricane Diane, now a category I hurricane, spreads clouds and thunderstorms north to Cape Hatteras.
1984 September 10 1530
281 thumbnail picture
GOES image of eastern North America. Hurricane Diana, now a category III storm, churns off the coast of North Carolina. Within a few hours this storm became a Category IV before rapidly weakening. Maximum winds at time of photo were 110 knots.
1984 September 11 1930
282 thumbnail picture
TIROS-N three dimensional cloud-top image of Hurricane Diana as it was strengthening from a Category III storm to a Category IV storm. This was one of the earliest three dimensional images of a hurricane from data obtained from satellite.
1984 September 11 2000
283 thumbnail picture
TIROS-N three dimensional cloud-top image of Hurricane Diana as it was strengthening from a Category III storm to a Category IV storm. This was one of the earliest three dimensional images of a hurricane from data obtained from satellite.
1984 September 11 2000
284 thumbnail picture
TIROS-N view of Hurricane Diana churning off North Carolina coast. The storm had mercifully weakened to a Category II status at this time with 95 knot maximum sustained winds. Notice cloud shadows on west side of Diana.
1984 September 12 124526
285 thumbnail picture
TIROS-N view of Hurricane Diana churning off North Carolina coast. The storm had mercifully weakened to a Category II status at this time with 95 knot maximum sustained winds.
1984 September 12 1900
286 thumbnail picture
GOES view of North America. The center of now Tropical Storm Diana is heading ashore just north of the South Carolina/North Carolina border. The beginnings of Hurricane Norbert are seen southwest of the southern tip of Baja California. Short-lived Tropical Storm Edouard is shown at its birth west of the Yucatan Peninsula in the Gulf of Mexico.
1984 September 13 1630
287 thumbnail picture
GOES view of North America. The center of Tropical Storm Diana is heading back out to sea after crossing North Carolina. Tropical Storm Edouard is approaching its maximum strength of 55 knots in the southwest Gulf of Mexico. Tropical Storm Norbert is deepening southwest of Baja California.
1984 September 14 1630
288 thumbnail picture
The remains of Hurricane Diana, still a tropical storm, heading offshore and out to sea.
United States East Coast 1984 September 14 2030
289 thumbnail picture
A volcanic eruption originating at Isla Fernandina in the Galapagos Islands is evident in this image. The arrow points to a volcanic plume approximately 75 miles long cutting across other cloud structures. This image, obtained from the NOAA-2 satellite, was the first evidence of this volcanic eruption. This image demonstrated the power of modern satellites to monitor volcanoes.
West Equatorial Pacific Ocean 1973 December 10
290 thumbnail picture
Infrared imagery of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf Stream. Lighter colors north of Florida Panhandle indicate extent of cold air swooping down from the north behind a cold front. Clouds in upper right corner show very cold tops (lighter) and indicate significant convection and possible thunderstorms.
Florida 1982 February 20 0810 GMT
291 thumbnail picture
Infrared imagery of the Loop Current in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf Stream. Lighter colors north of Florida Panhandle indicate extent of cold air swooping down from the north behind a cold front. Clouds in upper right corner show very cold tops (lighter) and indicate significant convection and possible thunderstorms.
Florida 1982 February 20 0810 GMT
292 thumbnail picture
Warm rings show clearly breaking off the Gulf Stream and migrating onto the continental shelf off of the Mid-Atlantic states. Convective cloud activity is seen east of Cape Cod and south of Cape Hatteras.
United States East Coast 1982 April 24 1851 GMT
293 thumbnail picture
Loop Current shows as darker water in the Gulf of Mexico as seen by Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) on NOAA -3 satellite.
Gulf of Mexico 1974 March 31
294 thumbnail picture
Gulf Stream is seen as darker water extending to northeast from Cape Hatteras. This image was obtained from the Very High Resolution Radiometer (VHRR) on the NOAA-3 Satellite.
United States East Coast 1974 April 28
295 thumbnail picture
Visible imagery (VIS) and Infrared (IR) photographs from NOAA 2 Very High Resolution Radiometers (VHRR), orbit 2453. NOAA 2 was at an altitude of 905 miles. The visible channel represents reflected light, while the IR image has been derived from a sensor response to the temperature of the earth, ocean, and clouds.
Western Atlantic 1973 April 29 1500 GMT
296 thumbnail picture
Infrared imagery as obtained by the Landsat satellite of upper Chesapeake Bay.
Chesapeake Bay 1972 October 11
297 thumbnail picture
Infrared imagery as obtained by the Landsat satellite of upper Chesapeake Bay.
Chesapeake Bay 1972 October 11
298 thumbnail picture
Infrared imagery of cloud top temperatures over Kansas and Oklahoma. Red indicates coldest temperatures which are associated with highest cloud tops and most intense convection and precipitation.
1985 June 11 0300 GMT
299 thumbnail picture
A V-2 Rocket Launch. This particular rocket was launched to study the upper atmosphere and carried instrumentation to study the velocity of sound and to measure the temperature at high altitudes. In: "Weatherwise", Volume I, no. 3 , June 1948. P. 52.
New Mexico, White Sands Proving Ground 1948 April 02

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Last Updated:
April 30, 2013