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Meet the Photographers

Meet the Photographers -  Dr. James P. McVey

Dr. James P. McVey is presently Program Director of Aquaculture at the National Sea Grant College Program. He is responsible for reviewing the proposals pertaining to aquaculture received from the Universities in the Sea Grant System and he monitors the Sea Grant activities for the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Florida, North Carolina, Georgia and Louisiana programs.

He is the Program Manager for NOAA's Oyster Disease Research Program and the Gulf Oyster Industry Initiative, and he manages the National Aquaculture Initiative, all competitive programs. He also serves on the Executive Committee of the Joint Subcommittee on Aquaculture, as Chairman of United States/Japan Panel on Natural Resources (Aquaculture), and as Chairman of the Living Marine Resources Panel between China and the United States (U.S.). He has provided input to the National Academy of Science review panels on aquaculture, the Federal Coordinating Committees on Science and Technology Aquaculture and Biotechnology), and Small Business Innovative Research review panels for the National Science Foundation, United States Department of Agriculture and other organizations.

He was selected for a one year Fellows program with the Council of Excellence and was chosen as the graduation speaker by his colleagues. He has received The Department of Commerce Bronze Medal (1995) and the Department of Commerce Silver Medal (2000) for developing a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Aquaculture Program and his international leadership in aquaculture development. He has worked for two years in Indonesia with the U.S. AID, where he established or upgraded four fresh water shrimp hatcheries on the island of Java and worked to bring improved technology for marine shrimp hatcheries throughout the country. Previous to his assignment in Indonesia he served as the Aquaculture Division Chief for the National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Center for a period of five years. He was involved with the development of techniques for captive spawning of marine shrimp and fish, shrimp broodstock nutritional requirements, hatchery technique development, and headstarting of the endangered Kemp's Ridley turtle.

Dr. McVey spent seven years as the Marine Biologist for the Trust Territory of the Pacific, where he designed and built the Micronesian Mariculture Demonstration Center (MMDC). The MMDC worked on the culture of giant clams, rabbitfish, oysters, freshwater and saltwater prawns and was responsible for introducing brackishwater pond culture to Micronesia. During this time in Micronesia, and while a student at the University of Hawaii, he participated in several research cruises and expeditions as a diver and biologist which required him to learn the life histories and identification of significant number of species in the tropical Pacific. This included pioneering artificial reef studies in Hawaiian waters.

Dr. McVey has served on the World Aquaculture Society Board of Directors for two years and has served on the Affiliation Committee and the Editorial Board for the WAS book series. He was Program Chairperson for the WAS part of Aquaculture "92" held in Orlando, Florida, where over 2,000 scientists participated.

Dr. McVey received his B.S. degree from the University of Miami and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Hawaii. He has published three major books on aquaculture and nearly 50 scientific publications.

Jim and his wife, Eileen, live in Rockville, Maryland, and have two grown children, Christopher and Colleen plus Buster the dog. Jim enjoys hiking, wilderness canoeing, diving, fishing or anything in the great out-of-doors. Photography is still an important part of both he and his wife's interests. They are in the process of buying a lot on the Chesapeake Bay so they can be closer to the water.

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September 30, 2009